course listings, SP2019

University College Courses

Below are courses offered for the Master's Program of University College.

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U89-414 01: From Redlining to Avocado Toast: Race, Class, and Real Estate

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Michael Allen

Description

Much contemporary discourse around urban studies concerns both the growing awareness that  American cities relied on racial segregation in their development, and the recognition that gentrification is changing who gets to inhabit certain areas. In both established and revitalizing cities, race and class seem to determine how much of our paychecks go to rent and whether the coffee shop on the corner sells avocado toast. This course examines the ways in which historic segregation practices - red-lining, restrictive covenants, zoning laws and suburban enclave creation - intersect with contemporary gentrification aspects - being "priced out" or displaced, changing faces of neighborhoods from low-income residents to more affluent "hipsters" and professionals, and the success of places like Brooklyn alongside continued decline of places like Flint. The relationship between segregation practices and gentrification aspects will be addressed through historic and contemporary accounts ranging across scholarship, journalism, fiction, film and music. Historic research on St. Louis will support a broad inquiry across American cities near and far, to unpack why the US continues to struggle making cities that truly belong to everyone.

This course fulfills the Humanities distribution requirement for the AMCS MA program. The course may also count towards the Undergraduate Major or Minor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T--- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

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U89-4262 01: Art Writing and Anthropological Storytelling

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Benson

Description

This course explores the field of art writing as it relates to cultural anthropology.  Anthropologists studying diverse cultures, subjective experience, and profound societal transformations are increasingly using experimental writing techniques from journalism, memoir, creative non-fiction, critical-fiction, site-writing, poetry, and queer studies.  We engage anthropological writing styles that emphasize new aesthetical and literary means of describing the richness, the deep emotional tone, and also the dangers of human experience.  We read works that look at ordinary life and everydayness, how we perceive the world around us, the feeling of being at home and senses of place, how we experience pain, what makes our bodies powerful or vulnerable, why things really matter, and how communities cope with trauma, violence, mental illness, addiction, and life during wartime.

Upon completion of this course, students will have obtained a comprehensive understanding of contemporary experimental genres in creative writing as they intersect with humanistic endeavors in cultural anthropology. This develops practical tools that can be used in self-reflection and social analysis, and strategies for writing and reading works of culture with an eye toward the richness of the possibilities and predicaments that define human conditions.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W-- 5:00-7:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

Anthropology U89 4262

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U89-454 01: Ethics and Ethnography

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Willow Mullins

Description

This course sets out to explore the ethical questions raised during ethnographic research. Ethnographic research requires the student of culture to form deep relationships with the people whose culture they hope to study. How are the goals of the ethnographer in balance with the needs of those they study? How can histories of oppression affect the ethnographic relationship? Following Ella Shohat, we will ask, "who is mobilizing what in the articulation of the past, deploying what identities, identificationsand representations, and in the name of what political vision and goals?" Ethnographies will form our primary texts for the course, supplemented with ethnographical theory. While we take a theoretical approach to the subject, students are encouraged to think in terms of their own work and projects, with the ultimate goal of producing an ethics statement of their own.

This course fulfills the Humanities or Social Science distribution requirements for the AMCS MA program. The course may also count towards the Undergraduate Major or Minor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M---- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

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U89-474 01: Studies in American Cultural Identity: The Civil War to the Jazz Age

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Allen Schwab

Description

The course is an exploration of later 19th-early 20th Century American literary, visual, and musical art in relation to key themes, decisive moments, and cultural developments which have shaped and defined our national character.  Struggles for religious, racial, and gender rights; American violence; our polarities of innocence and experience, of individual and group welfare, individualism and conformity; and complex expressions of The American Dream and its dreamers, all receive attention.  We view American Post-Romantic, Realistic, Naturalistic, and Post-World War I visual art, architecture, and photography; listen to late 19th Century, turn of the Century, and Jazz age music; and read from major and less well known literary figures to consider how the social and political developments of the time influenced our artists as the flourishing of a distinctly American art became an internationally acknowledged fact.

The course counts toward the American Culture Studies Major and Minor for day students, and  fulfills the Humanities or Arts distribution requirement for the AMCS M.A. program.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W-- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

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