course listings, FL2018

University College Courses

Below are courses offered for the Master's Program of University College.

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U89-407 01: Blue Plate Special: Food Folklore, and Culture

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Willow Mullins

Description

We gather to eat. We catch a bite on the fly. We worry about calories and cholesterol and stock our fridges with fresh fruit, then feast on French fries. This class will examine the embodied, everyday performance of foodways of America.

While food supplies us at a mundane level with fuel, culturally food offers a way for people to encode social identities and negotiate their relationships with themselves and others.  Food can demark axes of race, ethnicity, class, and gender, but it can also define trajectories of region and history. Such cultural moments of food can be celebrations, think festivals of barbecue, or fraught with tension, what makes a dish authentic.

Using the food itself as a starting point through weekly shared snacks, we will look at scholarly writing, cookbooks, and popular food writing and film to think through how we construct ourselves through what we eat. Students will read two to three articles per week and keep a foodways journal. The final project will include an annotated bibliography and either a proposal for a longer paper or a creative option of the student's design, such as a cookbook or a guide to the foodways of their region.

This course satisfies the Humanities requirement for the Master of Arts in American Culture Studies. This course counts for the Pop Culture Concentration Area for AMCS Majors and Minors.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M---- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

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U89-482 01: And Justice for All? American Inequalities

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Christopher Hamilton

Description

In this course we examine social inequality in the contemporary United States, with a particular focus on disparities related to health, wealth, housing and neighborhoods, criminal justice, and education. The St. Louis metropolitan region will serve as a guiding case study, tying together the course themes with a common example of how inequality shapes material and political life. We will investigate the current empirical reality and historical roots of American inequality, the key theories and methodological tools used to examine and explain inequality, the institutions responsible for its reproduction, and possibilities for reducing inequality via social policy and social movement. Within each topic area, we will pay special attention to the significance of race and ethnicity, social class, and gender-as well as their intersections and cleavages. We will largely constrain our inspection of inequality to American metropolitan areas as we analyze the spatial or place-based effects associated with disparities in urban America. Readings are drawn from sociology, urban history, geography, political science, economics, social epidemiology, and education.

This course satisfies the Social Sciences requirement for the Master of Arts in American Culture Studies. For AMCS Majors and Minors, this course counts toward the Race and Ethnicity and Social Thought and Social Problems Concentration Areas.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T--- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac