course listings, FL2017

University College Courses

Below are courses offered for the Master's Program of University College.

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U89-438 01: Colonial and Early American St. Louis, 1764-1821

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Bob Moore

Description

This course will examine the unique culture of the colonial town of St. Louis and surrounding region, with predominantly French, Spanish, Native American and African American influences during the early historical period starting with founding in 1764 through incorporation in 1821. This milieu will be explored in terms of slavery and freedom, social hierarchy, economics and cultural clashes. Students will examine the legacy of enslaved people and the specific conditions of slavery and freedom under each of St. Louis' colonial governments, paying special attention to the shift from an integrated to a segregated community. The course will give students the opportunity to work with rich primary and intriguing secondary source materials pertaining to this largely forgotten period in American history. St. Louis will also be studied as a borderland city on the edge of a frontier, examining its relations with Indian tribes, European nations, and the infant United States to the east. An examination of St. Louis at this period provides an opportunity to investigate comparative colonialisms and, after the arrival of the United States Government with the Louisiana Purchase, early instances of American political and cultural imperialism, as well as Indian policies which would be repeated throughout the nation's relentless acquisition of the trans-Mississippi West. Students pursue their investigation through papers, readings and course discussions. This course fulfills the Humanities distribution requirement for the AMCS MA program  (the Concentration Areas listed below apply only to undergraduates taking the course for the AMCS Major or Minor).

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T--- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Early America
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
War & Peace

Program Attributes

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U89-4772 01: The History and Practice of Photography: Its Role in Shaping an American Cultural Identity

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Jennifer Colten Schmidt

Description

Presented within the frameworks of history, theory, and practice, this class will explore the impact photography has had on shaping American cultural thought and expression. Students will examine the role photography has played in forming a concept of a particular American Identity as well as a range of individual and collective identities constructed throughout photographic history. Topics to be covered include: the American experience defined through early exploration photographs and land surveys; the 19th-century African American Identity as formed through photographic portraiture; the dual roles of photography as art and photography as activism; photography's political and social voice; and photography's role in articulating environmental issues in America. In addition to written work, students will produce two short photographic assignments and one final photographic project. No previous formal photographic or art training will be necessary.  This course fulfills the Fine Arts distribution requirement for the AMCS MA program (the Concentration Areas listed below apply only to undergraduates taking the course for the AMCS Major or Minor).

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M---- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac