course listings, SP2018

University College Courses

Below are courses offered for the Master's Program of University College.

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U89-3510 01: History of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement: Jamestown to Ferguson

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Hall

Description

This course examines the origins, evolution, and impact of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement beginning with the North American slave trade in Jamestown, Virginia in 1619, through civil disobedience and race riots in the mid-twentieth century, to the response, locally and nationwide, to Michael Brown's violent death in Ferguson. Special emphasis is placed on tracing its impact and continuing legacy on contemporary ideas and social policies about race, ethnicity, culture and national origin.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

---T- 5:30-8:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

History U89 3510

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L98-400B 01: AMCS Capstone Workshop II

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Noah Cohan

Description

This course is required for students planning to complete the Latin Honors thesis or a 6-credit non-honors project through American Culture Studies. It builds on work done in L98 400A: AMCS Capstone Workshop I, and involves periodic workshops and conferences with the instructor and project advisor(s) during the final stages of thesis preparation. Alternatively, students seeking to earn an additional 1-2 credits for their one-semester capstone will enroll in this course after their petition to expand their capstone has been approved and expectations have been defined in consultation with the capstone advisor and workshop instructor. Prereq: Satisfactory standing as a candidate for a two-semester capstone, including successful completion of L98 400A Capstone Workshop I and permission of project advisor. Latin Honors eligible students must meet the University GPA minimum. Credit variable, max. 3 units. Course will meet every other week, time/date to be determined based on participants' schedules.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

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U89-420 01: History of American Architecture

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Michael Allen

Description

This course examines the ideological, political, economic and social determinants that have shaped the look of American architecture. Throughout readings that will include a survey text in addition to topical works covering the social history of housing, the vernacular architecture of Las Vegas and the rise (and fall, and rise) of Frank Lloyd Wright, students will learn the definitive characteristics of American architecture. A central point of study will be examining contradictory tendencies in the American practice of architecture: the embrace of exceptionalism through modern forms and styles representing a new national identity, occurring alongside the emulation of classical and European precedents to legitimate a new nation's buildings. The readings will illuminate how the characteristics of American architecture reveal the social, economic and political structures of its production. Ultimately, students will be able to read an American building to discern evidence of national identity, individual political agency, the evolution of gender roles, the assertion of disciplinary and economic power, and the evolution of the American artistic sensibility. This course will count toward major in American Culture Studies for day students. This course fulfills the Humanities distribution requirement for the AMCS MA program. It also counts towards the MD and some concentration area requirements for the AMCS Major and Minor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T----- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Early America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

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U89-445 01: Intro to American Culture Studies: American Nightmares

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Monahan

Description

National myths tend to coalesce around familiar tropes, idealized figures, and coherent narratives.  But these myths have often relied upon acts of exile, abuse, and erasure, as well as active repression of more 'nightmarish' elements of our history and culture.  Starting with a consideration of persistent national fantasies and political ideals--for example, that of America as the 'New World Eden'--this course will explore several of the nightmares that haunt us, including racialized and mob violence (for example, the 1917 massacre in East St. Louis), abusive forms of social control (for example, by cult leaders from Matthias the Prophet and Jim Jones), adolescent rebellion (as expressed in schlock horror and punk rock), and foreign contagion (whether biological or ideological).  These nightmares are tangled up with, and reflect darkly upon, such positive American ideals as egalitarianism, democracy, benevolent leadership, domestic order, and purity.  In this sense, they are ideal subjects for the student of American culture.  Students will engage scholarship that provides relevant historical and theoretical frameworks, analytical tools, and disciplinary methods, as well as a range of cultural artifacts (material in local archives, literary works, live music, film, etc.) related to the core subjects.  Throughout the semester, we will also consider how effective cultural interpretation is achieved--what kinds of questions, concepts and analytical approaches are suited to this kind of work--and hear from guest faculty whose work relates to the topics at hand.

This course fulfills the Humanities, Arts, or Social Science requirement for the AMCS M.A. Program.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M---- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

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U89-461 01: Construction and Experience of Black Adolescence

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Duncan

Description

This course examines the construct of black adolescence from the general perspectives of anthropology, sociology, and psychology.  It begins by studying the construct of black adolescence as an "invention" of the social and behavioral sciences.  The course then draws upon narrative data, autobiography, literature and multimedia sources authored by black youth to recast black adolescence as a complex social, psychological, cultural and political phenomenon. This course focuses on the meaning-making experiences of urban-dwelling black adolescents and highlights these relations within the contexts of class, gender, sexuality, and education.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W-- 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

AFAS U89 461B

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U89-465 01: Studies in American Cultural Identity: Beginnings to the Civil War

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Allen Schwab

Description

An exploration of early American literary, visual, and musical art in relation to key themes, decisive moments, and cultural developments which have shaped our national character and influenced our first internationally recognized artists, as the formation of a distinctly American art begins. Struggles for religious, racial, and gender rights, American violence, polarities of innocence and experience, individualism and conformity, The American Dream and its dreamers, all receive attention. Viewing of American Neoclassical and Romantic visual art and architecture, listening to colonial, Federalist, Jacksonian and post-Jacksonian era songs and ballads, and reading from major and less well known 17th, 18th, and 19th Century literary and historical figures. This course counts for the AMCS Major and Minor and fulfills the Humanities or Arts distribution requirement for the AMCS M.A. Program.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

Early America
Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

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