course listings, FL2017

Undergraduate Courses

Every semester, AMCS posts our home-based and cross-listed courses on a custom webpage where students can sort courses by level, concentration, designation, and instructor. These are the same courses as listed in WebStac, but with information specific to the major and minor, like concentration area and requirement. Select from the nav bar below to review the list for the upcoming semester.

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  • FL2017

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L98-1012 section 01: Intro to Urban Studies

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Camp Yeakey

Description

This course provides a survey of the field of Urban Studies, utilizing the city of St. Louis as a field site. The major purpose of the course is to gradually reveal how a city operates internally, and how it operates externally with its sister cities, surrounding metropolitan areas and neighboring states, amidst competing and often contradictory interests. Utilizing historical analysis as a guide, the course will briefly revisit the experiences of previous waves of ethnic groups to the St. Louis metropolitan area, as a lens for understanding the current social, political and economic dilemmas which many urban dwellers in St. Louis now face. The course will reveal to students the intricacies of social welfare issues and policies among high density populations, in St. Louis, that are homogeneous and heterogeneous, at the same time. Visits and discussions with various governmental and nongovernmental agencies, and how such agencies function or dysfunction for various constituencies allow students to ask crucial questions regarding equality of opportunity in a democratic society. Students will also encounter diverse communities and neighborhoods and the intended and unintended consequences of social welfare policies designed to ameliorate urban dilemmas such as poverty and inequality, homelessness, educational underachievement, gentrification, migration and immigration, development, health care, fiscal issues, the informal economy, and issues concerned with crime and social justice, among others. Readings are reinforced and challenged through visits, interactions and observations with broad constituencies and institutions, ranging from city officials to community residents. As such, this course offers a survey discussion of the rich interdisciplinary field of Urban Studies for those who may be interested in pursuing a stand alone major in the field of Urban Studies.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

AMCS L98 1012

Register via WebStac

L98-101B section 01: American Politics

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Andrew Reeves

Description

This course provides an overview of the politics of the American system of government. Among the topics to be covered are the historical developments of American politics, ferderalism, political participation (voting, interest groups, parties), institutions (congress, the courts, the president), and public opinion. A theme underlying our examination of these and other topics will be the fact that political actors are purposive in their strategic pursuit of various objectives. We will explore the many ways in which this aspect of political behavior impacts institutions and the interactions between political actors throughout the American political system.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

POLITICAL SCIENCE L98 101B

Register via WebStac

L98-122 section 01: A&S Freshman Seminar - A Sense of Place: Discovering the Environment of St. Louis

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Frances Martin

Description

Go exploring in and around St Louis. Rivers, prairies, urban landscapes and more. You'll learn about the St. Louis backyard, and your ""home"" for the next four years. Through field trips, readings, interviews and discussion, you'll see first-hand what challenges face the environment and the people who live here. You will learn how to examine multiple perspectives, how to think critically and how to approach problems from an interdisciplinary and holistic approach. You'll also learn why it is important to know a community at the local level if you're going to affect change on any level-state, national, or international. In addition to weekly readings and discussion, this class includes several field trips.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

---T--- 1:00-4:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES L98 122

Register via WebStac

L98-163 section 01: Freedom, Citizenship, and the Making of American Culture

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Peter Kastor

Description

This course offers a broad survey of American history from the era before European settlement of North America to the late twentieth century. The course explores the emergence and geographic expansion of the United States and addresses changes in what it meant to be an American during the nation's history. Tracing major changes in the nation's economic structures, politics, social order and culture, the course chronicles, among other issues, changes in the meanings of freedom, citizenship, and American identity. Introductory course to the major and minor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:00

Concentration Areas

Early America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

INTRO

Same As

HISTORY L98 163

Register via WebStac

L98-180 section 01: Freshman Seminar: Jewcy: Jewish Culture in the 21st Century

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Nancy Berg

Description

This course will examine cultural expressions of American Jewish identity within an ethnographic context. We will analyze processes of assimilation, Americanization, and innovation, as well as Jewish contributions to popular American culture and entertainment, from Irving Berlin to Madonna, and the 'The Joys of Yiddish' to 'jewlicious.com.' Moving from tradition to modernity, pluralism and transdenominationalism and back to tradition (sometimes with a vengeance) we explore challenges to Jewish identity and creative responses through the cultural lens.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-F-- 11:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

JEWISH, ISLAMIC AND NEAR EASTERN STUDIES L98 180

Register via WebStac

L98-2010 section 01: Religion and American Society

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Laurie Maffly-Kipp

Description

This course explores religious life in the United States. We will focus our study on groups and movements that highlight distinctive ways of being both "religious" and "American," including the Americanization of global religions in the US context. Major themes will include religious encounter and conflict; secularization, resurgent traditionalism, and new religious establishments; experimentalism, eclecticism, and so-called "spiritual" countercultures; the relationship between religious change and broader social and political currents (including clashes over race, class, gender, and sexuality); and the challenges of religious multiplicity in the US. You will: 1) acquire knowledge of the disparate religions practiced in North America during the twentieth century and beyond; 2) examine some of the chief conflicts as well as alliances between religion and the American social order in a global context; and 3) develop interpretive tools for understanding religion´s present and enduring role in the US and the world.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

RELIGION AND POLITICS L98 2010

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L98-2011 section 01: Understanding Racial Inequality in the Contemporary U.S.

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Patrick Denice

Description

Overview of sociological understandings of race, with a particular focus on race relations in the contemporary United States.? We begin by investigating how sociologists understand racial distinctions, asking: What comprises a racial group?? What constitutes a ""group"" in the social sense?? We then shift our attention to patterns of racial inequality in the U.S., investigating the intersection of economic, political, and racial stratification.? After analyzing national trends in racial stratification, we narrow the focus to particular regions and metropolitan areas, including St. Louis, to shed light on pressing public concerns such as the interrelationships between race and the criminal justice system.? The course ends by looking beyond U.S. borders to compare the way that race is understood in other countries.? Are there common patterns of racial classification shared by many societies? What makes the U.S. system of racial stratification distinctive?? No prerequisites.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

SOCIOLOGY L98 2011

Register via WebStac

L98-202 section 01: The Immigrant Experience

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Alfred Darnell

Description

This course explores the history and politics of immigrant groups in the nineteenth and twentieth century United States. Topics include legislation, patterns of migration, comparisons of different waves of immigration, and changing social attitudes. This course is a core requirement for the ethnic studies concentration in American Culture Studies.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Register via WebStac

L98-2033 section 01: Introduction to Education: Contradictions and Controversies in School Choice

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Ebony Duncan

Description

This course is a broad look at the diverse issues surrounding education not only in the U.S. but around the world. Students will examine schooling in areas such as the Pacific Rim, Middle East, Europe, and America. We will also take a look at educating when working with children with special needs. In addition, students will explore some of the ideas and issues unique to the experience of teaching and learning in the U.S. Students will work in small groups throughout the semester in projects designed to deepen their understanding of Education in the 21st Century. Throughout the semester, students will participate in the Each One Teach One program as tutors. (This course is recommended for Freshmen and Sophmores only)

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

EDUCATION L98 2033

Register via WebStac

L98-2152 section 01: The Theory and Practice of Justice: The American Historical Experience

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Iver Bernstein

Description

This introductory course uses historical case studies combined with readings in law, literature, and philosophy to illuminate key episodes where definitions of justice were contested in 19th and 20th century America. Some of the conflicts to be explored include: Cherokee Removal, Civil War era debates over southern secession; whether reparation should be offered to freed people to redress the injustices of racial slavery; the denial of voting rights to women as a case of ""taxation without representation""; 20th century controversies over legal bans on racial intermarriage; free speech versus hate speech in the 1960s and 70s; and recent debates over affirmative action and gay marriage. Attendance Required.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Early America
Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Register via WebStac

L98-220 section 01: Topics in American Culture Studies: American Democracy, from Tocqueville to Trump

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Tim Shenk

Description

This course introduces students to the different approaches and methodologies within the American Culture Studies field, including those represented by literature, history, sociology, and political science; at the same time, will learn key concepts within the field that will inform their future work. These are presented in a semester-specific topic of focus; please see Course Listings for a description of the current offering. The course is ideal for AMCS majors and minors, but others are welcome. This course fulfills the "Introductory Course" requirement for AMCS majors and minors.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Early America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

INTRO

Register via WebStac

L98-2356 section 01: From St. Louis to Shanghai: Cities and Citizens in Global Urban History

L98-245 section 01: Images of Disability in Film and Literature

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Kathleen Kniepmann

Description

This course will critically examine the portrayal of persons with disabilities in literature and film, exploring how those images either shape or mimic general public impressions. We will discuss the implications of messages from the media on American responses to people with disabilities, as well as formuLating strategies for promoting positive, inclusive messages. Perspectives from social science, health care, communications and other fields will provide frameworks for analysis. Literature will include fiction, biography and autobiography in books, essays, drama, poetry and short stories. Selections from fictional, educational, and documentary films will be reviewed during the semester. We will also investigate images in newspapers, magazines and advertising.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Same As

GENERAL STUDIES L98 245

Register via WebStac

L98-248 section 01: Latino/a Experiences in the United States

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Julia Macias

Description

Identity is a term that begins to give humans a sense of understanding who we are. In terms of the Latino/a diaspora in the United States issues of ethnicity, gender, nation, class, sexuality and race are key theoretical categories that aid us in theoretical and practical understandings of identity. In this course we analyze and discuss the concept of order to understand the constructions and varied meanings of the term. There ie a special emphasis placed on anthropological, historical, and social science literatures of the Caribbean, Latin America, and the United States as they pertain to deeper understandings of identity. Prerequisite: Membership in the Annika Rodriquez Program.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-2651 section 01: Urban America

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Douglas Flowe

Description

The city is a crucial frame for understanding the nation's cultural, economic, social, political and ecological concerns. This course discusses its importance in shaping American society and consider urban environments as living, breathing, contracting and expanding regions in the landscape. Questions of race, class and gender will be explored in an attempt to understand the current configuration of American cities, and to allow students to engage meaningfully with the continual transformation of urban space. Attention will be paid to the role played by popular imagination in the formation of public policy, civic spatial arrangement, suburban development and urban historical geography.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Same As

HISTORY L98 2651

Register via WebStac

L98-280 section 01: Exploring Inequality: The Social and Structural Analysis of Modern American Life

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Linda Lindsey

Description

What would it mean to engage in effective social and structural analysis of the complex problems of modern American life that are so often reduced by policy makers to matters of personal responsibility and individual choice? This is an urgent question at a historical moment when America ""society"" is becoming more diverse and more divided. This course explores four areas of inequality: poverty, racism and sexism, the crisis in health care, and the perils of globalization. We will pay particular attention to how intersections of minority statuses as defined by race, social class, gender, and sexuality conspire to script social and political outcomes. Our investigations will allow us to consider multiple academic and applied models. In an original research project that closely engages real world cases and draws upon multiple disciplinary perspectives, students will gain an understanding of the complexity of social problems, and what productive intellectual and policy responses entail. Guests from local social, educational, and political agencies will share their perspectives with the class. Above all, students will emerge from the course with a set of critical skills that will empower them to decipher contemporary policy debates and develop their own social analyses.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 8:30-10:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac

L98-280 section 02: Exploring Inequality: The Social and Structural Analysis of Modern American Life

Semester

FL2017

Section

02

Instructor

Linda Lindsey

Description

What would it mean to engage in effective social and structural analysis of the complex problems of modern American life that are so often reduced by policy makers to matters of individual choice and personal responsibility? This is an urgent question at a historical moment when American society is becoming more diverse and more unequal. Through a sociological lens, this course explores key areas of inequality: social class and poverty, racism and sexism, the crisis in health care, and the perils of globalization. We examine empirical underpinnings of these areas focusing on the intersection of statuses related to race, social class, gender, ethnicity, and sexuality that heighten risk for social and political disadvantages. Our investigation capitalizes on rich sources of multidisciplinary data and methods. These sources offer a foundation for an original research project allowing students to gain an understanding of the complexity of social problems emanating from inequality, and productive intellectual and policy responses. Guests from agencies dealing directly with these issues will share perspectives. Students will emerge from the course with critical skills that empower them to decipher contemporary policy debates and develop their own critical analyses.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-298 section 01: Directed Fieldwork in American Culture Studies

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Heidi Kolk

Description

Fieldwork under the direction of an AMCS-affiliated faculty. All proposals for study must be submitted for review and approved by the AMCS advisor. See the AMCS website for the appropriate form. By permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-299 section 01: The Study of Cities and Metropolitan America

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Carol Camp Yeakey

Description

This course serves as the introductory course analyzing the forces shaping America's cities and surrounding metropolitan areas. It examines as well strategies for dealing with many of the profound social issues affecting urban/metropolitan America. Emanating from an historical perspective, it examines the ways in which industrialization and deindustrialization shaped Northern American cities and the consequences of deindustrialization on urban citizenry. It further surveys the demographic and spatial transformation of American cities examining the consequences of urban transformation on federal, state and local politics, on society and on her institutions. Similarly, the course focuses on the origin and societal changes and emerging goals of urban development, gentrification and evolving patterns of metropolitanism and the necessity for central city as well as neighborhood reconstruction. The dynamics of racial residential segregation, crime and punishment, issues of academic achievement and under-achievement, the social cleavages of urban marginalized communities, family structure, urban homelessness, urban sprawl, and health care, among others, are viewed from the perspective of social justice by exploring social, political, economic, racial, and ethnic factors that impact on access, equity and care. Various theoretical perspectives and philosophies are introduced that have dominated the discourse on race and urban poverty. A field based component complements the coursework, and is designed to build interest, awareness and skills in preparation for outreach to urban communities. PREREQUISITE: Sophomore standing.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T----- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

URBAN STUDIES L98 299

Register via WebStac

L98-3002 section 01: Directed Study in Legal Culture

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Heidi Kolk

Description

Directed study with an AMCS-affiliated faculty. All proposals for study must be submitted for review and approved by the AMCS advisor. See the AMCS website for the appropriate form. By permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-3006 section 01: Local Archives: Directed Study in St. Louis

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Heidi Kolk

Description

Directed study with an AMCS-affiliated faculty. All proposals for study must be submitted for review and approved by the AMCS advisor. See the AMCS website for the appropriate form. By permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-3014 section 01: American Popular Music and Media

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

TBA

Description

This course considers the history of American popular music as delivered by successive mass media platforms in the industrial and post-industrial eras: from mass-produced sheet music in the mid nineteenth century to digital music and video on the internet. Historical contextualization and in depth analysis of musical scores and various kinds of audio recordings and audiovisual texts will be at the center of the course. Topics to be considered include: the history of sound recording technologies and formats; the role of electronic mass media structures (radio, film, television, the internet); urbanization, national commercial music centers (New York, Hollywood, Nashville), and the importance of regional sounds in a national context; the formation and transformation of select genres (rock, country, various black musics); legal frameworks relating to music as a commodity (copyright, sampling); the impact of visual media on music dissemination, performance, and meanings; and how recorded media of all kinds have transformed the act of listening. Issues of race, gender, sexuality, personal, and national identity will be considered across the course. Prerequisites: Music 121C and 122C (Theory I and II) or Music 121J and 122J (Jazz Theory I and II)

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

Music L27 3015

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 3: The American School

Semester

FL2017

Section

3

Instructor

Judy Lamb

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers, changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family, policy issues that have shaped the development of schooling in America. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

EDUCATION L98 301C

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 01: The American School

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Michelle Purdy

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers, changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family, policy issues that have shaped the development of schooling in America. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

EDUCATION L98 301C

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 02: The American School

Semester

FL2017

Section

02

Instructor

Madonna Riesenmy

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers, changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family, policy issues that have shaped the development of schooling in America. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

EDUCATION L98 301C

Register via WebStac

L98-301T section 01: Technology & American Culture: "The Devil's Wagon": Controversy & Celebration of the Early Automobile

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

David Walsh

Description

As with all newly emergent technologies, the early automobile rallied enthusiasts and detractors alike, spurring heated debates about class and labor and the role technology has-and should have-in an industrial society. Much like the factory, automobiles became the locus of political, economic, and social conflict, particularly in urban settings where the competing narratives of progress and degradation were especially evident. In this multidisciplinary course we'll examine such debates up close, and develop a working model for studying the relationship of technology and culture that complicates popular understandings of technological innovation, change, and social impact. Part of our study will focus on the mechanical and engineering principles of the early-era automobile itself by means of 3D image-modeling, engineering schematics, and instruction manuals to develop an understanding of 'how it works.' Another part will focus on reading primary documents like magazines, newspapers, etiquette manuals, print advertisements (available from WUSTL's Modern Graphic History Library) and other popular publications of the late 19th and early 20th centuries to broaden our historical understanding of cultural perceptions of the automobile, of factories, and of technology in general. Grounding these examinations will be scholarly readings in history and history of technology, sociology of technology, philosophy, and cultural study. Students will develop final projects that explore the many ways that the automobile-as a site of contested narratives, cultural values and ideologies-shaped the broader social, political, and civic culture of the urban landscape. NOTE: no experience in auto mechanics or engineering required! This is a humanities-based study of technology, and while past experience studying culture is helpful, this too is not a pre-requisite.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 8:30-10:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac

L98-301U section 01: Historical Methods - United States History

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Andrea Friedman

Description

HOW TO DO THE HISTORY OF SEXUALITY: Researching and writing the history of sexuality presents a unique set of challenges. At many times and places sex has been supposed to be confined to the "private" sphere and so the kinds of evidence that historians often rely on can be difficult to find. Sex is also highly policed, with the result that the diversity of sexual practices is often hidden--"what ought to be" is radically different from "what is." This course will investigate how historians have responded to these challenges to understand how sexual practices, ideologies, identities and regulatory systems have changed over time. We will explore innovative approaches to evidence as well as theoretical frameworks for thinking about the relationship between private and public, experience and identity, practice and power. Most of our examples will be drawn from the United States, but where useful we will compare the U.S. experience to other locales as well. PREREQUISITE: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. Modern, U.S.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

HISTORY L98 301U

Register via WebStac

L98-301U section 02: Historical Methods - United States History

Semester

FL2017

Section

02

Instructor

Peter Kastor

Description

HAMILTON'S AMERICA: HOW TO DO THE HISTORY OF POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT: The popularity of the musical Hamilton has fueled a renewed interest in the politics of the early American republic. This seminar explores that world by examining how Americans sought to translate their notions of government into a realistic set of priorities and a functioning set of public institutions during the years following ratification of the Constitution. In the process, this course also considers the methods that historians can use to analyze politics, policymaking, and governance. This course uses the life and career of Alexander Hamilton as a point of departure for investing how the federal government came into being, what it did, and who populated the civilian and military rank of American officialdom. The course will examine the various methodologies that historians can use to address these topics. We will consider the relative merits and limits of both qualitative and quantitative methods. This course will also devote considerable attention to the methods of digital history that have emerged in recent years, both as a means of analyzing and representing historical material. This course does not require any prior knowledge of early American history or digital methods. PREREQUISITE: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. Pre-modern, U.S.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

HISTORY L98 301U

Register via WebStac

X10-307 section 01: Community Building

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Bob Hansman

Description

This course looks at the intersection of the built fabric and the social fabric. Using St. Louis as the starting point, this course takes students out of the classroom and into a variety of neighborhoods--old, new, affluent, poor--to look at the built environment in a variety of contexts and through a variety of lenses. Almost every week for the first half of the semester, students visit a different area (or areas), each trip highlighting some theme or issue related to the built environment (architecture, planning, American history, investment and disinvestment, community character and values, race, transportation, immigrant communities, future visions, etc.). Running parallel to this, students are involved in an ongoing relationship with one particular struggling neighborhood, in which students attend community meetings and get to know and become involved with the people in the community in a variety of ways. Students learn to look below the surface, beyond the single obvious story, for multiple stories, discovering their complexity, contradictions and paradoxes. They also come to consider the complex ways in which architecture and the built environment can affect or be affected by a host of other disciplines. College of Architecture and College of Art sophomores, juniors, and seniors have priority. Fulfills Sam Fox Commons requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M---F 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Same As

Design and Visual Arts XCOR 307

Register via WebStac

L98-3081 section 01: City on a Hill: The Concept and Culture of American Exceptionalism

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Abram Van Engen

Description

This course examines the concept, history, and culture of American exceptionalism-the idea that America has been specially chosen, or has a special mission to the world. First, we examine the Puritan sermon that politicians quote when they describe America as a "city on a hill." This sermon has been called the "ur-text" of American literature, the foundational document of American culture; learning and drawing from multiple literary methodologies, we will re-investigate what that sermon means and how it came to tell a story about the Puritan origins of American culture - a thesis our class will reassess with the help of modern critics. In the second part of this class, we broaden our discussion to consider the wider (and newer) meanings of American exceptionalism, theorizing the concept while looking at the way it has been revitalized, redefined and redeployed in recent years. Finally, the course ends with a careful study of American exceptionalism in modern political rhetoric, starting with JFK and proceeding through Reagan to the current day. In the end, students gain a firm grasp of the long history and continuing significance - the pervasive impact - of this concept in American culture.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Early America

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-310A section 01: From Hysteria to Hysterectomy: Women's Health Care in America

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Barbara Baumgartner

Description

This course examines issues surrounding women's health care in America. While the scope is broad, the major emphasis will be on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Through an examination of popular writing, scientific/medical writing, letters, diaries, and fiction, we will look at the changing perceptions and conceptions of women's bodies and health in America.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY STUDIES L98 310A

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L98-3121 section 01: Topics in American Literature: Girls' Fiction

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Amy Pawl

Description

Little Goody Two Shoes taught morality and the alphabet to the poor children of her village and eventually rode in a coach and six; Nancy Drew drove a blue roadster (later a convertible and still later a hybrid) while solving crimes and bringing justice to the town of River Heights. Between these two landmark characters lie the two and a half centuries of rich and diverse fiction for girls that will be at the center of this writing-intensive course. After grounding our studies by reading selected works from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, we will concentrate on twentieth-century productions, beginning with the surprisingly progressive serial fiction produced by the Stratemeyer Syndicate and others in the early 1900s. (Titles such as The Motor Girls, The Moving Picture Girls, and The Outdoor Girls advertise the series´ departure from domestic settings.) Throughout our study of both popular and classic texts, we will investigate the social, political and familial roles for girls that the texts imagine. Major genres will include mysteries, frontier fiction, career fiction, domestic fiction, school stories, and fantasy. Authors will include Newbery, Alcott, Montgomery, Wilder, Lindgren, and "Carolyn Keene." Writing Intensive. Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture

Program Attributes

Same As

ENGLISH LITERATURE L14 316W

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L98-3121 section 02: Topics in American Literature: Girls' Fiction

Semester

FL2017

Section

02

Instructor

Amy Pawl

Description

Little Goody Two Shoes taught morality and the alphabet to the poor children of her village and eventually rode in a coach and six; Nancy Drew drove a blue roadster (later a convertible and still later a hybrid) while solving crimes and bringing justice to the town of River Heights. Between these two landmark characters lie the two and a half centuries of rich and diverse fiction for girls that will be at the center of this writing-intensive course. After grounding our studies by reading selected works from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, we will concentrate on twentieth-century productions, beginning with the surprisingly progressive serial fiction produced by the Stratemeyer Syndicate and others in the early 1900s. (Titles such as The Motor Girls, The Moving Picture Girls, and The Outdoor Girls advertise the series´ departure from domestic settings.) Throughout our study of both popular and classic texts, we will investigate the social, political and familial roles for girls that the texts imagine. Major genres will include mysteries, frontier fiction, career fiction, domestic fiction, school stories, and fantasy. Authors will include Newbery, Alcott, Montgomery, Wilder, Lindgren, and "Carolyn Keene." Writing Intensive. Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Popular Culture

Program Attributes

Same As

ENGLISH LITERATURE L14 3121

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L98-312A section 01: Introduction to Digital Humanities: Cultural Analysis in the Information Age

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Anupam Basu

Description

It is a truism that computers have changed our lives and the way we think and interact. But in fact systematic efforts to apply current technologies to the study of history and culture have been rare. This course will enable students to consider how these technologies might transform the humanities. We will explore the various ways in which ideas and data in the humanities can be represented, analyzed, and communicated. We will also reflect on how the expansion of information technology has transformed and is continuing to transform the humanities, both with regard to their role in the university and in society at large. Readings and classwork will be supplemented by class presentations and a small assigned group project.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

INTERDISCIPLINARY PROJECT IN THE HUMANITIES L98 312A

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L98-312W section 01: Topics in English and American Literature: End of the Century: American Cultue During the 1990s

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Matthew Shipe

Description

Starting with Allan Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind," a book that helped re-ignite the Culture Wars, this course will consider the debates and problems that pervaded American culture during the 1990s. From the end of the Cold War to the sexual scandals that rocked Bill Clinton's presidency, from the emergence of the Internet to the rise of grunge and rap, the 1990s were a time of vast change in American culture. It was period when we, as a nation, reconsidered the legacy of the 1960s, the Reagan revolution, and the end of the Cold War, a time of economic expansion and cultural tension. In our consideration of this period, we will take a multidisciplinary approach when tackling a variety of materials-ranging from literary fiction (Philip Roth's "The Human Stain," Jonathan Franzen's "The Corrections") and popular films (Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing" and The Cohen brothers' "The Big Lebowski") to personal memoir and the music of Nirvana and Public Enemy-in an attempt to come to a better understanding of our recent history. Throughout the semester, we will pursue the vexed cultural, political, and historical questions that  Americans faced in the years between the fall of the Berlin Wall and the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001, and consider how literary texts imagined this period of American history. Other possible texts include David Foster Wallace's "A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again," Joan Didion's "Political Fictions," Toni Morrison's "Paradise," John Updike's "Rabbit at Rest," and Elizabeth Wurtzel's "Prozac Nation." Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

ENGLISH LITERATURE L98 312W

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L98-3130 section 01: Education, Childhood, Adolescence, and Society

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Madonna Riesenmy

Description

An examination of childhood, child development, and education from different perspectives. Observation of children in a variety of settings, including classrooms. Through historical, sociological, psychological and political readings, students will clarify current ideas about children, investigate the nature of childhood, and begin to understand how and why childhood is constructed as it is. PREREQUISITE: SOPHOMORE STANDING. Limited to 45 students.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

EDUCATION L98 3130

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L98-3130 section 02: Education, Childhood, Adolescence, and Society

Semester

FL2017

Section

02

Instructor

Madonna Riesenmy

Description

An examination of childhood, child development, and education from different perspectives. Observation of children in a variety of settings, including classrooms. Through historical, sociological, psychological and political readings, students will clarify current ideas about children, investigate the nature of childhood, and begin to understand how and why childhood is constructed as it is. PREREQUISITE: SOPHOMORE STANDING. Limited to 45 students.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

EDUCATION L98 3130

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L98-3132 section 01: Topics in Composition: Writing and the Law

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Victoria Thomas

Description

An advanced writing course focusing on selected topics related to writing. Topics to be chosen by department/instructor. See section description for details about specific class emphases. (Note: In some cases, this course may be cross-listed with other programs/departments and may satisfy the writing-intensive requirement.) PREREQ: Writing 1 (L13 100) and junior standing.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

WRITING L98 3132

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L98-314A section 01: Urban Inequality: Racism, Segregation, & Ghettoization in the American City

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Francisco Vieyra

Description

The academic study of urban inequality proceeds from the understanding that: 1) cities are deeply unequal, especially when considered in terms of race and class; 2) rather than being random or natural, urban inequality is the product of human ideas, policies, and practices; and 3) urban inequality has substantial and enduring impacts on city life and life chances, especially for racial minorities and the poor. Echoing these general themes, this course closely examines the causes, development, and consequences of urban inequality in the U.S. context. In order to explore U.S. urban inequality most clearly, the course focuses on the African-American urban experience and what has variously been called the "black belt," the inner city, and, most importantly, the ghetto. The scope is still national, though, with analyses of New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, D.C., Detroit, Chicago, New Orleans, Oakland, and St. Louis, among other cities. The course primarily draws from sociology and history but also includes insights from anthropology, political science, criminology, and law, among other disciplines.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

AMCS L98 314A

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L98-315A section 01: Topics in American Literature: Popular Music and American Literature from Rag to Rap

L98-315B section 01: Virtues, Vices, Values: Regulating Morality in Modern America

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

R. Griffith

Description

This course takes morality and the question of "what's right" seriously as a lens through which to understand and assess modern American history. "Morality" is, of course, a devilishly flexible rhetoric, a language invoked to tell people how to act and how to be good, or, conversely, to criticize and to shame. When the state or a community wants its citizens or members to be "good," it crafts laws and creates customs to encourage or inhibit behaviors. This class examines how state and non-state actors have attempted to regulate the lived experiences of Americans and the conflicts that emerge over what, exactly, is correct, or right, or good for individuals, society, and the state. It interrogates what values the state impresses upon its citizens and what values citizens want the state to uphold.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T----- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

RELIGION AND POLITICS L57 315B

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L98-316F section 01: Rediscovering the Child: Interdisciplinary Workshops in an Urban Middle School

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

R Lorberbaum

Description

It is said that at this time in history the entire country must make a commitment to improve the positive possibilities of education. We must work to lift people who are underserved; we must expand the range of abilities for those who are caught in only one kind of training; and we must each learn to be creative thinkers contributing our abilities to many sectors of our society. In this course, we expand our views about learning by experimenting with the creative process of lateral thinking. In the first six weeks of the semester, we learn about learning by meeting with exceptional people with many scholarly, professional, and civic engagement accomplishments. We also learn by working in teams to develop an exciting set of 2-D / 3-D, hands-on, problem-solving workshops for middle-schoolers from economically disadvantaged urban families; the workshop curriculum will be based upon your knowledge and passion as well as your interests. During the last eight weeks, we deliver these workshops once a week to students at Compton-Drew Middle School (adjacent to the Science Center in the city of St. Louis). In this course we celebrate the choices of studies we each pursue, and expand our experience by learning from each other's knowledge bases and creativity. The course is open to students from all disciplines, schools, freshmen through seniors, and meets the multidisciplinary Fieldwork requirement for AMCS majors.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 3:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

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L98-317S section 01: Service Learning: Documenting the Queer Past in St. Louis

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Andrea Friedman

Description

Around the U.S. and the world, grassroots lgbtq history projects investigate the queer past as a means of honoring the courage of those who have come before, creating a sense of community today, and understanding the exclusions and divisions that shaped their communities and continue to limit them. In this course, we participate in this national project of history-making by helping to excavate the queer past in the greater St. Louis region. Course readings will focus on the ways that sexual identities and communities in the United States have been shaped by urban settings since the late nineteenth century, with particular attention to the ways that race, class and gender have structured queer spaces and communities. In their community service project, students will work with the grassroots St. Louis LGBT History Project to research St. Louis's queer past, including conducting oral histories with local LGBTQ elders. IMPORTANT NOTE: This is a service-learning class, which means it combines classroom learning with outside work at a community organization. In addition to regular class time, there is a service requirement, which will necessitate an additional 3-4 hours a week. Before beginning community service students must complete required training. Prerequisite: Introduction to Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies or Introduction to Queer Studies, or permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

4

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Same As

WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY STUDIES L98 317S

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L98-3237 section 01: The Art of popular Song: From Folk and Musical Theatre to Rock and Contemporary A Capella

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

William Lenihan

Description

This course explores the art of songwriting through the lens of American popular music. Students examine landmark songs from multiple eras and create their own original songs in a variety of styles, from classical music, folk music, and Broadway to rock, pop, and a capella. Through composing and arranging, listening and analysis, students gain insight into the sonic structure and cultural significance of popular music. The course also responds to students' individual interests and performance backgrounds, offering opportunities to write music for vocal ensembles, small groups, singer-songwriter formats, and electronic media.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture

Program Attributes

Same As

MUSIC L98 3237

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L98-3255 section 01: Development of the American Constitution

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Randall Calvert

Description

The practical meaning of the Constitution has changed since 1787-not only as a result of normal amendments and court interpretations, but also through normal politics and unconventional transformations. After initial discussion of the nature of the Constitution and of constitutional interpretation, the course examines important instances of such change processes. These have resulted in important reformulations, usually gradual but occasionally sudden, of executive branch powers, the judicial system, the electoral system, federalism, economic regulation, and civil rights. The course then devotes special attention to several present-day issues of constitutional politics, such as presidential war powers, the use and misuse of secret agencies, the ""unitary executive theory,"" and the special constitutional significance of the Justice Department. Prerequisites: L32 101B American Politics. Formerly L32 3254 Constitutional Politics in the U.S.; students who have taken that class are not eligible.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

POLITICAL SCIENCE L98 3255

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L98-327 section 01: Public Opinion and American Democracy

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Deborah Sinclair

Description

This course is about the salience of public opinion and its influence on American Politics. Topics to be covered include many of the theories developed to explain how public opinion is formed, if and why it changes, and the relationship between public opinion and the political behavior of citizens and elites. Therefore, the course will describe and analyze many of the factors that influence the formation, structure and variation in public opinion: information processing, education, core values, racial attitudes, political orientation (ideology and party identification), political elites, social groups, the media and religion. Additional topics include presidential approval, congressional approval, and the relationship between public opinion and public policy. The course will also train students in several concepts of statistical analysis (assuming no prior knowledge) so that students can use these tools as part of their own research projects. Prerequisites: Previous coursework in American politics or communications.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMCS L98 327

Register via WebStac

L98-3283 section 01: Introduction to Global Health

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Peter Benson

Description

This course provides a general introduction to the field of public health. It examines the philosophy, history, organization, functions, activities, and results of public health research and practice. Case studies include infectious and chronic diseases, mental health, maternal and reproductive health, food safety and nutrition, environmental health, and global public health. Students are encouraged to look at health issues from a systemic and population level perspective, and to think critically about health systems and problems, especially health disparities and health care delivery to diverse populations. No background in anthropology or public health is required.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-F-- 12:00-1:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

ANTHROPOLOGY L98 3283

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L98-330A section 01: Native American/Euro-American Enounters: Confrontation of Bodies and Beliefs

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Christine Croxall

Description

This course surveys the history and historiography of how Native Americans, Europeans, and Euro-Americans reacted and adapted to one another's presence in North America from the 1600s to the mid-1800s, focusing on themes of religion and gender. We will examine the cultural and social implications of encounters between Native peoples, missionaries and other European and Euro-American Protestants and Catholics. We will pay particular attention to how bodies were a venue for encounter-through sexual contact, through the policing of gendered social and economic behaviors, and through religiously-based understandings of women's and men's duties and functions. We will also study how historians know what they know about these encounters, and what materials enable them to answer their historical questions.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Early America
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
War & Peace

Program Attributes

Same As

RELIGION AND POLITICS L98 330A

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L98-330C section 01: Culture & Identity: Black Lives Matter: Art, Theory, and Practice

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Jasmine Mahmoud

Description

How does an attention to contemporary black artistic practices animate activism of the Black Lives Matter movement? How might we document and theorize black aesthetics in relationship to black politics? This course considers these questions by examining contemporary art practices that champion black humanity, and intervene in anti-black racism in the criminal justice system, housing, education, employment, and everyday life. We observe black aesthetics in practices such as poetry, performance art, theater, dance, music, photography, film, and visual art. We study foundational and contemporary critical theory invested in black politics, black feminism, black resilience, black excellence, and black joy. We also engage with St. Louis artists, and practice producing artistic work, including a performance or action, a song or poem, and visual artwork or short film. No artistic experience is required. Texts of study include: Force Continuum by Kia Corthron; An Octoroon and Appropriate by Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, A Seat at the Table by Solange; as well as visual art, poetry, and film by St. Louis-based artists.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac

L98-3360 section 01: Topics in AMCS: From Hammerstein to Hamilton: The Broadway Musical and American Cultural Politics

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Ashley Pribyl

Description

The Vice President's trip to see Hamilton and the subsequent responses from both the cast and President Trump have ignited a debate about the relationship between the Broadway musical and American politics. The Broadway musical, as a major American popular and artistic genre, has a long history of engaging with political discourse and policy - one that includes reinforcing, challenging, and shaping the cultural norms of the nation. This course examines the cultural and political history of the Broadway musical, using methodologies from a variety of disciplines, including performance studies, musicology, history, and political science. Focusing on issues such as gender, sexuality, race, imperialism, and nationalism, this course explores the complex relationship between popular culture and political thought. This is not a survey of the Broadway musical, but no prior knowledge of the musical or music more generally is required.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac

L98-341 section 01: Understanding the Evidence: Provocative Topics of Contemporary Women's Health and Reproduction

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Margaret Baum

Gil Gross

Description

Contemporary topics of women's health and reproduction are used as vehicles to introduce the student to the world of evidence-based data acquisition. Selected topics span and cross a multitude of contemporary boundaries. Issues evoke moral, ethical, religious, cultural, political and medical foundations of thought. The student is provided introductory detail to each topic and subsequently embark on an independent critical review of current data and opinion to formulate their own said notions. Examples of targeted topics for the upcoming semester include, but are not limited to: Abortion, Human Cloning, Genetics, Elective Cesarean Section, Fetal Surgery, Hormone Replacement, Refusal of Medical Care, Medical Reimbursement, Liability Crisis and Gender Bias of Medical Care.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T----- 6:00-9:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY STUDIES L98 341

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L98-3450 section 01: Sexual Politics in Film Noir and Hardboiled Literature

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Gaylyn Studlar

Description

Emerging in American films most forcefully during the 1940s, film noir is a cycle of films associated with a distinctive visual style and a cynical worldview. In this course, we will explore the sexual politics of film noir as a distinctive vision of American sexual relations every bit as identifiable as the form's stylized lighting and circuitous storytelling. We will explore how and why sexual paranoia and perversion seem to animate this genre and why these movies continue to influence "neo-noir" filmmaking into the 21st century, even as film noir's representation of gender and sexuality is inseparable from its literary antecedents, most notably, the so-called ""hard-boiled"" school of writing. We will read examples from this literature by Dashiell Hammett, James Cain, Raymond Chandler and Cornell Woolrich, and discuss these novels and short stories in the context of other artistic and cultural influences on gendered power relations and film noir. We will also explore the relationship of these films to censorship and to changing post-World War II cultural values. Films to be screened in complete prints or in excerpts will likely include many of the following: The Maltese Falcon, Double Indemnity, Murder My Sweet, Phantom Lady, Strangers on a Train, The Big Sleep, The Killers, Mildred Pierce, The High Wall, Sudden Fear, The Big Combo, Laura, The Glass Key, The Big Heat, Kiss Me Deadly, The Crimson Kimono, Touch of Evil, Alphaville, Chinatown, Taxi Driver, Devil in a Blue Dress, The Bad Lieutenant, and Memento. Required Screenings.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

FILM AND MEDIA STUDIES L98 3450

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L98-3490 section 01: Media Cultures

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

TBA

Description

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of cultural and media studies. Through a focus on television and new media, it analyzes current theoretical ideas and debates about culture. Main topics include the relationship between new technologies and everyday life and popular culture; analysis of media messages and images; how media help construct new identities and mark differences between groups; analysis of the globalization of the production and circulation of media culture; the rise of multimedia cultural industries; and the role of the audience. Required Screenings: Wednesdays @ 4 pm.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

Film and Media Cultures L53 349

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L98-3504 section 01: The Making of American Conservatism Since 1932, from Herbert Hoover to Donald Trump

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Gerald Early

Description

Beginning with Hayek's The Road to Serfdom and Buckley's God and Man at Yale, this course examines some of the major conservative writers and thinkers in the United States since World War II. The course includes readings by Russell Kirk, Richard Weaver, Barry Goldwater, Phyllis Schlafly, Irving Kristol, Newt Gingrich, and Pat Buchanan as well younger conservatives like Mark Steyn, Jonah Goldberg, Ramesh Ponnuru, S. E. Cupp, and Kevin Williamson. Several classes are devoted to Black conservatives including Thomas Sowell, Shelby Steele, and Walter Williams. We will try to answer the questions: What is conservatism and who are its adherents? Can we speak of conservatism in the singular or are there several types of conservatism? Are the various forms of conservatism politically and intellectually compatible? How has conservatism changed since Reagan and the 1980s? What inroads has conservatism made in the cultural and political life of the United States? Is the United States essentially a conservative nation? Time permitting; we may also watch a few Hollywood movies by conservative filmmakers.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-3507 section 01: Legal Conflict in Modern American Society

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Michael Cannon

Description

Thousands of lawsuits are filed daily in the state and federal courts of the United States. The disputes underlying those lawsuits are as messy and complex as the human, commercial, cultural and political dynamics that trigger them, and the legal processes and analytical constructs for resolving those disputes are expensive, time-consuming and, for most citizens, seemingly impenetrable. At the same time law and legal conflict permeate public discourse in the United States to a degree that is unique in the world, even among the community of long-established democracies. The overarching objective of the course is to prepare our undergraduate students to participate constructively in that discourse by providing them with a conceptual framework for understanding both the conduct and resolution of legal conflict by American legal institutions, and the evolution of - - and values underlying - - the substantive law American courts apply to those conflicts. This is, at core, a course in the kind of legal or litigation "literacy" that should be expected of the graduates of first-tier American universities. Some of the legal controversies that will be used to help develop that "literacy" include those surrounding the permissible use of lethal force in self-defense, the constitutionality of affirmative action in university admissions, the enforceability of presidential travel bans; contracts that are unconscionably one-sided, sexual harassment in the workplace, the duty of landlords to prevent criminal assaults on their tenants, groundwater pollution alleged to cause pediatric cancers, and warrantless searches of cellphone locator data by police. Sophomore standing is strongly recommended for enrollment in this course. Attendance mandatory during the first week of classes.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-3510 section 01: Topics in American Politics: The Supreme Court

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

James Spriggs

Description

The principal purpose of this course is to provide students with a systematic understanding of the U.S. Supreme Court. After discussing the social scientific study of the Court, we will examine theoretical issues regarding judicial process and politics. This course, unlike the constitutional law classes, does not focus on legal doctrine; rather, it examines political aspects of the Supreme Court, with an emphasis on the social scientific literature on law and politics. We will seek to understand phenomena such as the following: (1) Why does the Court change law? (2) Under what circumstances does the Court overrule precedent? (3) Do elected politicians (such as members of congress) influence how the Court decides cases (4) How does bargaining among the Justices influence the development of legal doctrine? One of the themes in this course is how we can understand the judiciary in terms of a political "game." That is, we will examine how the various participants in the judiciary attempt to achieve their goals within the constraints of the institution and its surrounding environment. Additionally, students will write a major research paper in which they will explain a specific set of judicial behaviors or events. The paper requires each student to undertake original research (i.e., the gathering of original evidence) in an effort to test their explanation.This course is intended primarily for sophomores and juniors.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

POLITICAL SCIENCE L32 3510

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L98-3522 section 01: Topics in Literature: Passing

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Rafia Zafar

Description

Every day human beings pass, that is, exchange one identity for another: African Americans become Caucasians; Jews opt for identifying as Gentiles; the poor and socially low transform into the rich and well-connected; women live and work as men; those called disabled fit themselves into the one-size-fits-all model. This class will consider the many narratives of crossing over, be they fictional or actual stories of lives lived-and those left behind. Among authors likely to be assigned are F. Scott Fitzgerald, Nella Larsen, and Alison Bechdel; films such as "Victor, Victoria" or "Europa, Europa" might also be included. Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

ENGLISH LITERATURE L14 3522

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L98-3524 section 01: Topics in Literature: What If? On Counterfactional Fiction

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Melanie Micir

Description

What if you had made a different choice, taken the other of Frost's "two roads diverged in a yellow wood," and your life had been completely different? What if the Confederacy had won the Civil War? What if Hitler had never been born? And why are twentieth- and twenty-first-century novelists so interested in the exploration of counterfactuality? Building on the critical contributions of Catherine Gallagher and Andrew Miller, this course traces the various methods by which writers like Kingsley Amis, Kate Atkinson, Octavia Butler, Michael Chabon, Philip K. Dick, Stephen King, Philip Roth, and Virginia Woolf imagine the lives we might have led (but didn't) and the alternate worlds we might have inhabited (but haven't). What's so interesting about what never happened? Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

ENGLISH LITERATURE L98 3524

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L98-352A section 01: The Black Athlete in American Literature: Frederick Douglass to Lebron James

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Noah Cohan

Description

The black athlete is a central figure in American entertainment, and has been since Frederick Douglass decried Christmastime slave games in his Narrative. This course will examine literary depictions of black athletes-in novels, memoirs, essays, and poems-in order to better understand the cultural significance of sportsmen and women in the African American struggle for equality, from abolitionism to the "Black Lives Matter" movement. We will read works by Douglass, Ralph Ellison, Maya Angelou, and John Edgar Wideman, among others, and examine the lives and athletic pursuits of prominent athletes such as Jackie Robinson, Muhammad Ali, Wilma Rudolph, Michael Jordan, and LeBron James. Popular perceptions of gender and sexuality, in addition to race and racism, will factor into our readings, especially as students incorporate secondary sources into their own research.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-3561 section 01: Law, Gender, and Justice

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Karen Tokarz

Description

This course (formerly called "Women and the law") explores how social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexuality have shaped traditional legal reasoning and American legal concepts, including women's legal rights. We will begin by placing our current legal framework, and its gender, race, sexuality, and other societal assumptions, in an historical and Constitutional context. We will then examine many of the questions raised by feminist theory, feminist jurisprudence, and other critical perspectives. For example, is the legal subject gendered male, and, if so, how can advocates (or women and men) use the law to gain greater equality? What paradoxes have emerged in areas such as employment discrimination, family law, or reproductive rights, as women and others have sought liberal equality? What is the equality/difference debate about and why is it important for feminists? How do intersectionality and various schools of feminist thought affect our concepts of discrimination, equality, and justice? The course is thematic, but we will spend time on key cases that have influenced law and policy, examining how they affect the everyday lives of women. Over the years, this course has attracted WGSS students and pre-law students. This course is taught by law students under the supervision of a member of the School of law faculty. In Spring 2017, Jesse Doggendorf, Sapna Khatri, Rebecca Swarm, and Sarah Watson will be teaching this course under the supervision of Professor Susan Appleton. STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN L77 3561 WOMEN AND THE LAW CAN NOT TAKE THIS CLASS.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY STUDIES L98 3561

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L98-358 section 01: Law, Politics and Society

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

James Gibson

Description

This course is an introduction to the functions of law and the legal system in American society. The course material will stress the realities of the operation of the legal system (in contrast to legal mythology), as well as the continuous interaction and feedback between the legal and political systems. There are four specific objectives to the course: (1) to introduce you to legal concepts and legal theories; (2) to analyze the operation of the appellate courts, with particular emphasis on the U.S. Supreme Court; (3) to analyze the operation of American trial courts, especially juries and the criminal courts; and (4) to examine the linkages between culture and law.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

POLITICAL SCIENCE L98 358

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L98-361A section 01: Women and Social Movements:Gender and Sexuality in US Social Movements

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Trevor Sangrey

Description

This course examines the history of grassroots activism and political engagement of women in the US. Looking at social movements organized by women or around issues of gender and sexuality, class texts interrogate women's participation in, and exclusion from, political life. Key movements organizing the course units include, among others: the Temperance Movement, Abolitionist Movements, the Women's Suffrage Movements, Women's labor Movements, Women's Global Peace Movements, and Recent Immigration Movements. Readings and discussion will pay particular attention to the movements of women of color, as well as the critiques of women of color of dominant women's movements. Course materials will analyze how methods of organizing reflect traditional forms of "doing politics," but also strategies and tactics for defining problems and posing solutions particular to women. Prerequisites: Any 100- or 200- level Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies course or permission from the instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Early America
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY STUDIES L98 361A

Register via WebStac

L98-367 section 01: America in the Age of Inequality: The Gilded Age & the Progressive Era, 1877-1919

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Margaret Garb

Description

This course will explore dramatic changes in American society during the half-century from the Civil War to the end of WWI. We will discuss industrialization; mass immigration from Europe, Asia and Latin America; the vast movement of rural people to cities; the fall of Reconstruction and rise of Jim Crow; the expansion of organized labor; birth of American Socialism; and the rise of the American empire in the Caribbean and the Philippines. The course will, in addition, analyze the many and varied social reform efforts of the turn of the twentieth century, from women's suffrage to anti-lynching campaigns; from trust-busting and anti-immigrant crusades to the settlement house movement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

HISTORY L98 367

Register via WebStac

L98-3682 section 02: The U.S. War in Iraq, 2003-2011

Semester

FL2017

Section

02

Instructor

Krister Knapp

Description

This course presents a historical assessment of the United States' eight year war in Iraq from its inception on March 20, 2003, to the withdrawal of all combat troops on December 15, 2011. Topics to be covered include: the Bush Administration's decision to make Iraq part of the ""War on Terror"" and the subsequent plan of attack; the combat operations; losing the victory; sectarian violence; torture; the insurgency; battling Al-Qaeda in Iraq; reassessment; the surge; the drawdown; and the end of the war. The course will conclude with an assessment of the war's effectiveness regarding the Global War on Terrorism and U.S. policy in the Middle East.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

War & Peace

Program Attributes

Same As

HISTORY L98 3682

Register via WebStac

L98-371A section 01: Sociology of Immigration

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Ariela Schachter

Description

A review of theoretical and empirical research on how and why people migrate across international borders, and the consequences of international migration for immigrants and natives in the United States. While immigration is one of the most controversial issues in the contemporary United States, these contentious debates are not new. Americans once voiced the same concerns about the economic and social impact of Southern and Eastern European immigrants that today are aimed at immigrants from Latin America, Asia, Africa and the Caribbean. In this course we will compare historical (1880-1920) and contemporary (1965-present) waves of immigration to the United States. We will explore why and how people migrate, immigrant integration, the impact of immigration on native-born Americans, and how government policies-at the national, state, and local level-shape immigrant assimilation and what it means to be considered truly "American," in a social as well as a legal sense. Prerequisite: completion of an introductory sociology course or consent of the instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

SOCIOLOGY L98 371A

Register via WebStac

L98-3742 section 01: Social Landscapes in Global View

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Michael Frachetti

Description

From the beginning of the human campaign, societies have socialized the spaces and places where they live. This socialization comes in many forms, including the generation of sacred natural places (e.g., Mt. Fuji) to the construction of planned urban settings where culture is writ large in overt and subtle contexts. Over the past two decades or so, anthropologists, archaeologists, and geographers have developed a wide body of research concerning these socially constructed and perceived settings -- commonly known as "landscapes". This course takes a tour through time and across the globe to trace the formation of diverse social landscapes, starting in prehistoric times and ending in modern times. We will cover various urban landscapes, rural landscapes, nomadic landscapes (and others) and the intersection of the natural environment, the built environments, and the symbolism that weaves them together. Chronologically, we will range from 3000 BCE to 2009 CE and we will cover all the continents. This course will also trace the intellectual history of the study of landscape as a social phenomenon, and will investigate the current methods used to recover and describe social landscapes around the world and through time. Join in situating your own social map alongside the most famous and the most obscure landscapes of the world and trace the global currents of your social landscape!

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

ANTHROPOLOGY L98 3742

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L98-3755 section 01: Disability, Quality of Life & Community Responsibility

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Kathleen Kniepmann

Description

The increasing prevalence of disability presents major challenges for American society. Social participation can be a challenge for people with disabilities, while resources to address these needs tend to be limited. This course will begin by critically analyzing concepts of disability, Quality of Life, health and social participation. We will construct a framework for examining social participation and community resources across the lifespan. Public health, educational and environmental theories and methods will be applied to programs and services that aim to enhance quality of life with disabilities. We will analyze ecological approaches to enhancing social participation. Upon completion of this course, students will be equipped to analyze challenges and prioritize resources for individual and population health.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

GENERAL STUDIES L98 3755

Register via WebStac

L98-375A section 01: American Culture: Methods & Visions: Buy American!

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Heidi Kolk

Description

In recent months we have learned that the Trump administration plans to re-negotiate NAFTA, extend the wall along the Mexico border, and pass large infrastructure bills. Such protectionist policies are informed by an old idea: that investing in U.S.-made goods is not only stimulating to the economy, but inherently patriotic--that it will "Make America Great Again." This seminar will explore the long-standing relationship between material consumption, political activism and identity. How does 'buying American' (or 'local,' or from community-minded businesses such as TOM'S) express a sense of who we are as individuals, as identity-based communities, and as a nation? How has it changed with the advent of social media and the digital marketplace? What will be the fate of the old national-consumerist logic in this, a period of continued economic uncertainty and broad skepticism about the practices of multi-national corporations (not to mention the federal government)? In considering these questions, we will look at historical cases ('See America First!' campaigns of the early 20th century, WWII war bonds, 'White label' activism, civil rights boycotts) as well as more-recent 'buy American' movements, including post-9/11 boosterism and various forms of 'conscientious capitalism.' The priorities for our work will include: 1) developing a fuller historical imagination for claims about the political and social meanings of American consumption, broadly defined; 2) conceptualizing the relationships between specific consumer practices and objects (including the material goods themselves) and broad conceptions of shared identity and meaning; and 3) exploring different theories, methods, and approaches to cultural interpretation that might inform later research. The final assignment will be a proposal for a future multidisciplinary cultural-studies project of students' own imagining that is informed by the work of the course. As a Writing Intensive course, 375A also serves as an occasion to think about matters of argument and written presentation of ideas. PREFERENCE GIVEN TO AMCS MAJORS AND MINORS. Majors take 375A to fulfill their required methods course. 375A does not double count for a concentration area in addition to satisfying the methods requirement. The concentration areas are listed for Minors who might take the course.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac

L98-3762 section 01: American Modernisms, 1900-1940

L98-3843 section 01: Filming the Black Freedom Struggle in St. Louis

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Garb and Ward-Brown

Description

This inter-disciplinary course is designed to introduce students to the history of the Black freedom struggle in St. Louis and to the complex and multiple ways historic narratives are constructed. We will explore the political, economic and cultural history of Black St. Louisians who challenged racial segregation in housing and work, fought white mobs in city streets and battled the destruction of Black communities by the federal urban renewal and public housing policies.This course will provide students with the opportunity to write history through visual sources, in order to construct a historical narrative on film. Students will be introduced to the technical skills involved in making a documentary film, and to the archival research and oral history skills required to document the past. This course brings together documentary filmmaking and history research to draw attention to the multiple narratives of African-American and urban history.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 1:00-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
A Sense of Place
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

HISTORY L98 3843

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L98-3950 section 01: Topics in Religion and Politics: Religious Celebrity

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Dana Logan

Description

This course investigates the intersection of religion and celebrity in American culture through figures such as Oprah and Billy Graham. Beyond looking at particular religious celebrities, the course looks at the history of fame, theories of ""charisma"", and secular celebrities as gods of the modern age. The course also traces the rise of theatrical stardom and religious charisma in the United States, and the ways in which political celebrity draws on these traditions.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

RELIGION AND POLITICS L98 3950

Register via WebStac

L98-4003 section 01: Advanced Research in American Culture Studies

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Heidi Kolk

Description

Directed study with an AMCS-affiliated faculty. All proposals for study must be submitted for review and approved by the AMCS advisor. See the AMCS website for the appropriate form. By permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-4004 section 01: Senior Honors Seminar in American Culture Studies

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Noah Cohan

Description

This course is required for students seeking college honors through American Culture Studies. Students discuss research methods and make regular research reports both to the instructor and other students. Prerequisite: satisfactory standing as a candidate for senior honors (3.5 cumulative GPA) and permission of thesis director. Credit variable, max. 3 units.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W-- 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-4011 section 01: Research Seminar: The Capstone Project

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Noah Cohan

Description

Independent study with an AMCS-affiliated faculty. All proposals for study must be submitted for review and approved by the AMCS advisor. See the AMCS website for the appropriate form. By permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W-- 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-403 section 01: Archaeology and Early Ethnography of the Southwest

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Gayle Fritz

Description

This course integrates archaeological, historical, and early ethnographic dimensions of American Indian societies in the southwestern United States and northwest Mexico, a region famous for its challenging environment, cultural diversity, and the contributions made by its Native inhabitants. Emphasis is placed on the development of sophisticated desert agriculture and on the rise of regionally integrated cultures including Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde. The impact of Spanish, Mexican, and American colonization are explored. Ethnographies of Tohono O'odham (Papago), Hopi, Zuni, Rio Grande Pueblo, and Navajo societies will be discussed.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Early America
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

ANTHROPOLOGY L98 403

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L98-4036 section 01: Children of Immigrants: Identity and Acculturation

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

LinLing Gao-Miles

Description

This seminar examines two sub-groups: child immigrants and the native-born children of immigrants. It interrogates cultural/ethnic identity, cultural adaptation, bilingualism and biculturalism, and challenges and achievements of this young generation through ethnography, literature, and sociological accounts. We aim to scrutinize the studies of the ""1.5"" generation and the second generation, and theories such as "segmented assimilation," across a wide range of ethnic groups, from people of East Asian origins to those with Latin American ancestries, by mainly focusing on their experiences in the United States.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

INTERNATIONAL AND AREA STUDIES L98 4036

Register via WebStac

L98-416 section 01: Topics in AMCS: Musings: Art, Government, and the Dilemmas of Cultural Policy in 20th Century America

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Maire Murphy

Description

In 1989, the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., cancelled their pending exhibit, Robert Mapplethorp: The Perfect Moment. Opponents of the exhibit rejoiced, arguing the “obscene” photography was not art. Advocates defended the work, and its NEA funding, as freedom of expression. Advocates and opponents both could claim their positions represented democracy at work. The Mapplethorpe controversy raises fundamental questions that frame this course: Is democracy good for the arts? Are the arts good for democracy? The partnership between the arts and government is vexed yet strangely collaborative. It promotes creative expression and civic participation despite of – and sometimes, because of - troublesome issues that state support for the arts, or, cultural policy, can generate. This course examines those issues, bringing into view the synergistic partnership between art and state and its significance for a democratic, and a creative, society. We explore numerous case studies from the 20th century that foreground this collaboration and highlight the challenges of cultural policy, for example, propaganda posters, New Deal art programs, NEA projects, and Smithsonian exhibits. These studies raise questions that prompt student to think critically about the relationship between art and democracy: How much agency does an artist have if state sponsored? Should the state be able to censor over art it supports? Does art tend to fragment or promote public accord? This historically grounded course draws on various fields of study to examine the context which state-sponsored art was produced, consumed, and interpreted. Students engage with visual and material culture, media, and archival materials. The seminar culminates in a substantial research project of the student’s design; topics may be drawn from the early twentieth century to the present-day.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac

L98-4214 section 01: From Mammy to the Welfare Queen: African American Women Theorize Identity

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Rebecca Wanzo

Description

How do representations of identity affect how we see ourselves and the world sees us? African American women have been particularly concerned with this question, as the stories and pictures circulated about Black female identity have had a profound impact on their understandings of themselves and political discourse. In this course we will look at how Black feminist theorists from a variety of intellectual traditions have explored the impact of theories of identity on our world. We will look at their discussions of slavery, colonialism, sexuality, motherhood, citizenship, and what it means to be human.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY STUDIES L98 4214

Register via WebStac

L98-4224 section 01: The 1904 St. Louis World's Fair: German and Austrian Art Exhibited

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Paul Lutzeler

Description

The St. Louis World's Fair of 1904 (The Louisiana Purchase Exposition) was one of the greatest events of its time. At the beginning we will deal with the historical development that lead to the purchase of the Louisiana Territory in 1803, will review the developments of World's Fairs since 1851 and will have a look at the grand dimension of the 1904 World's Fair (connected with the Olympic Games). Of central importance are the Art Exhibits from Germany and Austria with their cultural-political implications. The German Emperor had a hand in selecting the German paintings to be sent to St. Louis, and his opposition against modern movements like Impressionism caused opposition in Germany. Austria was different: In their Art Nouveau Pavilion they included secessionists (Hagenbund). The Wiener Werkstaetten (Vienna's Workshops) attracted a lot of attention. Different from the paintings, German Arts and Crafts represented avant-garde movements. We will visit libraries, archives, and museums in St. Louis that have World's Fair holdings. The seminar is for advanced undergraduate students but beginning graduate students can take it with permission of the instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

INTERNATIONAL AND AREA STUDIES L98 4224

Register via WebStac

L98-4231 section 01: Topics in American Literature I: White American Masculinities

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Vivian Pollak

Description

This course builds on the new interest in whiteness studies, which assumes that whiteness and masculinity are social constructions rather than "natural" identities. Moving from about 1830 to 1925, we will explore the development of a deeply contested discourse of "national manhood" in the United States, as it emerges in historically specific circumstances. How does whiteness intersect with related discourses of gender, sexuality, and social class? Beginning with the apocalyptic poetry and prose of Edgar Allan Poe, we will examine terrorized whiteness as an identifying feature of normative masculinity in the works of Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, Henry James, and F. Scott Fitzgerald. Do these authors claim the power to resist threats to their individual autonomy? To what extent do they experience masculine self-reliance as a myth? How do they imagine meaningful communities? Addressing these social issues and related aesthetic questions, we will venture, as Whitman says, "in paths untrodden." Students will write three papers of increasing complexity and there will be shorter writing assignments as well. Class attendance and active participation are required, naturally! Satisfies the Nineteenth Century requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

ENGLISH LITERATURE L98 4231

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L98-425A section 01: Law, Religion, and Politics

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

John Inazu

Description

What is the role of religious argument in politics and law? What kinds of arguments are advanced, and how do they differ from one another? Are some of these arguments more acceptable than others in a liberal democracy? This course will explore these questions through the work of legal scholars, theologians, and political theorists. Our topics include the nature of violence and coercion in the law, constraints on public reason, the relationship between religion and government, and the nature of religious practice and tradition.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M---- 2:00-5:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

Rel and Pol L57 425

Register via WebStac

L98-436B section 01: Seminar in Black Social Science

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Garrett Duncan

Description

This seminar applies a deep reading to social science texts that examine the construction and experiences of Black people in the United States from the point of view of Black scholars. Readings include theoretical and empirical work. The seminar focuses on the influence of the disciplines of psychology, sociology, and anthropology on the policy and social practices that characterize dominant North American institutions. Advanced class level strongly advised.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

AFRICAN AND AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES L98 436B

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L98-4373 section 01: Immigration, Identity, and the Internet

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Sunita Parikh

Description

This class exmines a critical issue in contemporary societies: How do changes in technology affect the process of immigration and how immigrant identity is shaped?

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

POLITICAL SCIENCE L98 4373

Register via WebStac

U89-438 section 01: Colonial and Early American St. Louis, 1764-1821

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Bob Moore

Description

This course will examine the unique culture of the colonial town of St. Louis and surrounding region, with predominantly French, Spanish, Native American and African American influences during the early historical period starting with founding in 1764 through incorporation in 1821. This milieu will be explored in terms of slavery and freedom, social hierarchy, economics and cultural clashes. Students will examine the legacy of enslaved people and the specific conditions of slavery and freedom under each of St. Louis' colonial governments, paying special attention to the shift from an integrated to a segregated community. The course will give students the opportunity to work with rich primary and intriguing secondary source materials pertaining to this largely forgotten period in American history. St. Louis will also be studied as a borderland city on the edge of a frontier, examining its relations with Indian tribes, European nations, and the infant United States to the east. An examination of St. Louis at this period provides an opportunity to investigate comparative colonialisms and, after the arrival of the United States Government with the Louisiana Purchase, early instances of American political and cultural imperialism, as well as Indian policies which would be repeated throughout the nation's relentless acquisition of the trans-Mississippi West. Students pursue their investigation through papers, readings and course discussions.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T--- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Early America
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
War & Peace

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-4456 section 01: Ethnographic Fieldwork: Energy Politics

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Bret Gustafson

Description

This is a practice-based course in ethnographic fieldwork that will focus on the politics of fossil fuels and the renewable energy transition in St. Louis and Missouri. We will situate ourselves as anthropologists with an interest in understanding relationships between global warming, the socio-technical arrangements of energy production, circulation, and use in the city and region, public knowledge, health, and social and cultural practices, and the roles and activities of businesses, political institutions, and elected officials. Through case studies we will work to produce critical knowledge aimed at pushing institutions, the city, and the region toward the transition to renewable energy. Our efforts will produce empirical documentation, case studies, and proposals and may include field trips to resource extraction sites and government offices

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T--- 9:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Same As

AMCS L98 4456

Register via WebStac

L98-4491 section 01: American Unbelief from the Enlightenment to the New Atheism

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Leigh Schmidt

Description

This seminar examines American secularism, humanism, and atheism from the Enlightenment forward to the present. Topics emphasized include: the relationship between believers and nonbelievers, the civil liberties of atheists, religion in the public schools, social radicalism and women's rights, and the more recent growth of religious disaffiliation and public atheism. The course considers not only the intellectual dimensions of freethinking unbelief but also the broader politics of secularism in a nation routinely imagined as "under God."

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M------ 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

RELIGION AND POLITICS L98 4491

Register via WebStac

L98-4505 section 01: American Political Parties

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Jacob Montgomery

Description

This seminar will introduce students to core literature on political parties with a strong bias towards recent research.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

POLITICAL SCIENCE L98 4505

Register via WebStac

L98-4520 section 01: Industrial Organization

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Ian Fillmore

Description

Theoretical and empirical analysis of the presence and value of competitive forces in the United States economy. Theories of industrial organization and development of criteria for performance of noncompetitive industries. Prerequisite: Econ 4011.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

ECONOMICS L98 4520

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L98-453 section 01: Sociology of Education

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Ebony Duncan

Description

This course provides an overview of sociological theory and research on education in contemporary U.S. society. Drawing from sociological perspectives, it covers the implications of schools and schooling for social inequality, mobility, and group relations. It examines major theoretical perspectives on the purpose and social organization of mass education in the United States, and topics related to the organization and function of schools, access to educational resources, and group disparities in school experiences and outcomes.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

EDUCATION L98 453

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L98-4532 section 01: Seminar in Constitutional Politics

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Randy Calvert

Description

In the wake of the 2016 election, observers of American politics are reassessing their understandings and expectations about the nature, practice, and prospects of American constitutional government. For students already having done upper-division course work in American or comparative political institutions, this seminar offers an opportunity to combine what they have learned with pertinent advanced material on the nature of American constitutionalism while pursuing and sharing individual research on related topics. Assigned reading topics will include constitutional interpretation and construction; the development and limits of executive power; and constitutional crises, emergencies, and failures. Prerequisite: A previous course at the 300-level or above in constitutional politics, constitutional law, or law and society; or, with instructor's permission, other relevant advanced coursework.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

---T- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

AMCS L98 4532

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L98-454 section 01: Environmental Policy

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Robert Pollak

Description

Course will examine the relationship between environmental economics and environmental policy. The course will focus on air pollution, water pollution, and hazardous wastes, with some attention given to biodiversity and global climate change. The course will examine critically two prescriptions that economics usually endorses: (1) ""balancing"" of benefits against costs (e.g., benefit-cost analysis) and the use of risk analysis in evaluating policy alternatives; (2) use of market incentives (e.g., prices, taxes, or charges) or "property rights" instead of traditional command-and-control regulations to implement environmental policy. Prerequisite: Econ 1011.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

ECONOMICS L98 454

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L98-457 section 01: American Film Genres

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

William Paul

Description

By close examination of three or four specific types of film narratives, this course will explore how genre has functioned in the Hollywood mode of production. Students will gain an understanding of genre both as a critical construct as well as a form created by practical economic concerns, a means of creating extratextual communication between film artist/producers and audience/consumers. Genres for study will be chosen from the western, the gangster film, the horror movie, the musical, screwball comedy, science fiction, the family melodrama, the woman's film, and others. In addition to film showings, there will be readings in genre theory as well as genre analyses of individual films. Required screenings Tuesdays @ 4pm

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

FILM AND MEDIA STUDIES L98 457

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L98-462 section 01: The Politics of Education

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Garrett Duncan

Description

Politics is interpreted broadly to include not just government, but any situation in which people have to solve a problem or come to a decision. This course focuses on schools and the processes through which certain stories, identities, and practices are promoted, and others, not.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

---T- 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

Education L12 462

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L98-4689 section 01: American Intellectual History to 1865

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Krister Knapp

Description

This course presents an overview of American intellectual history from the early seventeenth century and the founding of the first English settlements in North America to the mid-nineteenth century and the American Civil War. We will investigate how different thinkers responded to and helped shape key events and processes in colonial and early American history, concentrating in particular on developments in religious, political, social, scientific, and educational thought. We will cover major topics such as: Puritanism; the Enlightenment; Evangelicalism; Romanticism; and the inner Civil War. We will address concepts central to the formation of the nation's identity including those of the covenant; republicanism; citizenship; equality; freedom; liberty; natural law; transcendentalism; order; reason; progress; and democracy.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Early America
Early America

Program Attributes

Same As

HISTORY L98 4689

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L98-472 section 01: Hydrogen Jukebox: American Art and Culture, 1945-1960

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Angela Miller

Description

The rise and 'triumph' of Abstract Expressionism has long dominated the story of American art following World War II. This new seminar will put Abstract Expressionism into context with parallel developments in the arts, photography, and film. Among the topics we will consider: the conversation between émigré artists and American culture during and after the war; the emergence of a 'noir' aesthetic in film and literature; the early work of Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg and the so-called 'aesthetic of indifference' in relation to Ab. Ex.; artistic collaborations at Black Mountain College; New York school photography and photojournalism; and the cultural impact of the A bomb. PREREQUISITES: A 300-LEVEL COURSE ON 20TH CENTURY ART, PHOTOGRAPHY, OR HISTORY, OR PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T--- 6:00-9:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

AMCS L98 472

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L98-480 section 01: Education and Public Policy in the United States

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Odis Johnson

Description

This course takes a triangulated approach to the field of public policy as it relates to education and social problems. First, the course emphasizes theories of public policy that frame the field of policy studies. Major questions extending from this course feature include: What is public policy, policy behavior, its defining processes/features and what social function does it serve? Second, the course emphasizes the skills related to the exercise of policy analysis. These skills include the crafting of technical documents within the field of public policy (e.g. a policy brief) and the application of scientific methods to the exploration of social problems/governmental actions. Likely issues related to this course feature include the use of scientific knowledge in political arenas, engagement with stakeholders and the intended/unintended consequences of policy science to political decision-making. Third, this course simulates the policymaking context through students' participation in mock congressional testimonies. These focal areas will become central to an understanding of four social concerns: school desegregation following the Brown decisions; affirmative action in higher education; Head Start programs and/or the ESEA Act of 1965, also known as No Child Left Behind. Educational opportunity, achievement inequality and social change will be the primary interests that link these course features.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

EDUCATION L98 480

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L98-481 section 01: History of Education in the United States

L98-485A section 01: Advanced Seminar: Prisons, Politics and Activism

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Sonia Lee

Description

Prison reformers argue that de-criminalizing nonviolent offenses will be enough to reduce mass incarceration, while prison abolitionists argue that we need to dismantle the entire carceral state in the U.S., which is maintained by a racially stratified system of public schooling, housing, employment and health care. What is at stake in these deabtes? Are we seeking to promote basic humanity, racial and gender equality or utopian visions of rehabilitation? This course seeks to historically contextualize prison reform and abolitionism from the 13th Amendment's re-articulation of slavery to current resistance to mass incarceration. Special attention will be paid to the intersections between the prisoner's rights movement and the Black & Brown Power, feminist, queer and disability movements.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M------ 2:00-5:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

HISTORY L98 485A

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L98-487 section 01: Topics in American History: Race and Drugs in American History

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Douglas Flowe

Description

This course explores the racial construction of the use of legal and illegal substances in American history from the mid-19th century to the present. We will spend time engaging in a historical analysis of the social, economic, and racial dynamics that defined drug addiction in popular imagination, and examine how these factors contributed to discussions about legality, access to substances, one's ability to be rehabilitated, and criminal status. Regarding criminality we will particularly explore sociological and theoretical perspectives of labeling, habitual and occasional offenders, and moral panic in order to understand how racial minority groups were targeted for different rhetorical, legislative, and economic purposes. One major goal of the course will be to outline the early 20th century beginnings of the war on drugs and connect it to the century long growth of a militarized police system and prison industrial complex. We will secondly work to understand the role of local and national political actors, law enforcement, and the media in manufacturing and maintaining connections between race, crime and drugs. Ultimately, we will use our study of drugs to contextualize 21st century issues of police violence, increases in homicide in minority communities, mass incarceration, poverty, segregation, and mass movements of protest. The class format will be a large seminar where we will discuss themes and readings each week. Students will be expected to do the readings and contribute to discussions in each session.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

---T--- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

HISTORY L98 487

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U89-494 section 01: Voices in Action: History and Poetry of Protest in America (1930-Present)

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Parrish and Repice

Description

What sparks and sustains people's movements for social justice? This blended history and creative-writing course explores the contexts and expressions of 20th century and contemporary protest movements, ranging from labor, civil rights, the Vietnam War, ethnic people and women's movements, to the social and environmental justice movements happening now. We will explore speeches, manifestos, visual and oral texts, songs, and poetry to consider how dissent is voiced in response to specific social contexts and historic events. We will consider the role of personal expression in enacting democracy, focusing on poetry that helps articulate what is at stake in the protest movements of the 20th and 21st centuries. We will examine how language moves people, raising awareness of the facts and felt experiences of injustice, helping to fuel social movements and "call forth a public" to make change. Our own writing will provide a means to directly experience these themes. Assignments in this multidisciplinary exploration include a mix of historical analysis, ethnographic and participatory work, creative writing and reflection. This course counts for the Humanities requirement for the AMCS MA program. This course may also count for ArtSci Majors and Minors.


This course counts for the Humanities requirement for the AMCS MA program. This course may also count for ArtSci Majors and Minors.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M---- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

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L98-4992 section 01: The Business of Us All: In/equality in Theory and Practice

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Carol Camp Yeakey

Vetta Thompson

Description

This course uses a trans-disciplinary approach to discuss in/equality and its interrelated topics of inequality, inequity and social justice. While the focus is on the U.S. predominantly, lessons learned from our global partners are important components of our discussions. The course will emphasize the implications of our findings for other ethnic/racial minorities around the world. Equality speaks to issues of priority, fairness and impartiality. On the other hand, inequality is defined as marked difference among individuals or groups of individuals in the distribution of social goods. Inequity, which considers bias, discrimination and injustice in distributive systems, pushes the discussion further. As the various forms of social, political and economic inequalities are mutually reinforced, we examine economic inequality, residential segregation and housing quality; dis/investment in neighborhoods and communities; resource allocation to low income, city and predominantly ethnic minority schools; academic underachievement of minority youth; access to and provision of appropriate healthcare; curtailment of social welfare programs; the presentation of stereotypical images of persons of color in the media and school curricula; morbidity, mortality, and longevity rates for persons of color; environmental hazards; the surge in incarceration related to substance abuse and escaLating criminal prosecution, as well as discriminatory behavior of police and judges. All of the foregoing is made worse by race and gender status variables. Such factors cannot be considered inconsequential to social im/mobility and equality in the larger society. The collateral damage borne by the intergenerational transfer of social im/mobility and in/equality to future generations are integral to course discussions.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 2:00-5:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES L98 4992

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A48-524G section 01: American Cultural Landscapes

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Michael Allen

Description

Whether we are designing buildings, landscapes or neighborhoods, we are working on a cultural landscape - a place built from customs, memories, histories and associations as much as visual design itself. This course provides an overview of American cultural landscapes and their alteration, through readings, visual art, site visits and field surveys. Symbolic, utilitarian, architectural, scenographic or personal meanings will be explored alongside site histories. Throughout the semester, the course will interrogate the concept of vernacular landscapes, more broadly defined as landscapes of everyday life. From roadsides to homesteads to tourist attractions to landfills to urban neighborhoods, vernacular landscapes define the image of America to large extent. Readings will unpack the contingencies between design, economics, cultural politics, agriculture, consumption and technology that inscribe culture across the land.


Course work will be informed by the work of geographers, historians, writers, preservationists, filmmakers and visual artists. J.B. Jackson and Lucy Lippard's theories about the cultural uses of land will be anchors. Along the way, course readings and experiences (including field work) will make stops along the way to examine local landscapes including a radioactive landfill, the neighborhoods of Detroit, the "wild" west, Applachian terrain, the Mississippi River, the Sunset Strip, the Buffalo Bayou in Houston and more. The course will pose a taxonomy of the types of cultural landscapes while presenting various methods for decoding, recording, interpreting, preserving and altering these places.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

----F 8:30-11:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK
MD

Same As

Register via WebStac

A48-530B section 01: Anti-Development: Vacancy, Wildernes, and Ruin

Semester

FL2017

Section

01

Instructor

Michael Allen

Description

What if we let the city decline, change or go wild? Is land development truly "sustainable urbanism," or are depopulating cities like St. Louis and Detroit trying to speak another path to us? This seminar examines anti-growth urban land management and preservation practices - practices that embrace systems of emergent, wild and unexpected urbanism. With some readings as guide, students will explore topics of state landbanking and autonomous land trusts, managed depletion (including St. Louis' infamous "Team Four" memorandum), wilderness conservation and "greenway" creation, watershed reintroduction, agricultural land reclamation, experimental historic preservation projects that eschew restoration or even rehabilitation and even land taxation policies. The seminar will probe the question of what makes the city whole, with field outings in St. Louis and beyond. Work in the seminar will be based on site-specific interventions developed throughout the semester, proposing ways to undevelop sites and realize latent ecological vitalities.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M---- 8:30-11:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Same As

Landscape Architecture L98 530B

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