course listings, SP2019

Undergraduate Courses

Every semester, AMCS posts our home-based and cross-listed courses on a custom webpage where students can sort courses by level, concentration, designation, and instructor. These are the same courses as listed in WebStac, but with information specific to the major and minor, like concentration area and requirement. Select from the nav bar below to review the list for the upcoming semester.

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  • SP2019

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L98-105: History of Jazz

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Kurtz

Description

History of jazz to the present, including its African elements. 3 units. Same as home course L27 Music 105.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MWF 10:00-11:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 105

Register via WebStac

L98-118A: Geology of National Parks

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Dymek

Description

Survey of geologic processes occurring at the Earth's surface and its interior using national parks and monuments as the prime venue for presentation. Volcanism and mountain-building; the work of streams, glaciers, and wind; lake and coastline development; stratigraphy and sedimentation; and Earth history. Material presented in a geographic context, with emphasis on landforms and landscape evolution, relating geology to the development and settlement of the U.S. 3 units. Same as home course L19 EPSc 118A.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 118A

Register via WebStac

L98-135: First Year Seminar - Chinatown: Migration, Identity, and Space

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Gao-Miles

Description

"Chinatown," as a cultural symbol and a spatial entity, links various topics and studies in this course. Our survey starts with a historical and geographical glimpse of five Chinatowns in the U.S. through the real life stories of their residents. This is followed by an in-depth study of Chinese restaurants and food all over the world using texts, images, and films that reveal how Chinese cuisine is inherited in and adapted to each local culture and society. The seminar culminates in a discussion of Chinese migration and settlement, the representations of identity, and the cultural and spatial constructions in particular historical and social contexts. The assignments include fieldtrips to Chinese businesses, and a debate on whether or not Olive Blvd constitutes a Chinatown in St Louis. 3 units. Same as home course L97 IAS 135.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 135

Register via WebStac

L98-2033: Introduction to Education: Social Inequality, Development, & Early Childhood Education

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Kelly Harris

Description

Education begins long before children are introduced to formal schooling, and factors both internal and external to schools influence children's education. An understanding of the social, political, and economic contexts of families and schools is essential to understanding how social factors impact individuals. Race, class, health, and place exert influence on individual achievement and opportunity throughout the life course. This course will examine such factors as they relate to early developmental outcomes, school readiness skills, later academic achievement, and success in schooling. Course readings and activities will examine the influence of families, neighborhoods, the built environment and health on early childhood development and education and will offer corresponding implications for education policy. This course will examine the complex ecosystem of neighborhoods and schooling and will offer students a broad overview of these themes as we critically examine inequality and education in the United States. 3 units. Same as home course L12 Educ 203A.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 2033

Register via WebStac

L98-220: Topics in AMCS: "What's Opera Doc?" Music, Taste, and American Identity

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Megan Steigerwald Ille

Description

What do cartoon character Elmer Fudd, nineteenth-century performer Jenny Lind, and Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg have in common-and perhaps more importantly, what might their relationships with musical performance reveal about class, race, and access in American culture? In this class, we will examine the role of musical performance in shaping an American public identity (or identities). Asking how taste is informed by historical and contemporary modes of access to culture, we will consider the following in relation to genres including (but not limited to) Jazz, Hip-Hop, Opera, Blues, and Folk: How do technologies of acquisition and consumption shape musical genres? How are certain genres of music racialized or appropriated? How might performance venues or forms of mass media shape or control modes of access? And crucially, how might access to certain genres reveal larger structures of power and access to resources in American culture? We will begin by examining the historical roots of musical performance in the United States in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, focusing specifically on several urban centers: New York City, St. Louis, and San Francisco. Students will then have the opportunity to develop individual projects associated with specific genres under instructor supervision. This course will allow students to critically approach notions of taste, pleasure, and privilege in the formation of an American identity. 3 units. Same as L84 Lw St 220A, L27 Music 220.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Register via WebStac

L98-225A: Religion and Politics in American History

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Martin

Schmidt

Description

The United States has often been imagined as both a deeply Christian nation and a thoroughly secular republic. These competing visions of the nation have created conflict throughout American history and have made the relationship between religion and politics quite contentious. This course surveys the complex entanglements of religion and public life from the colonial era through the contemporary landscape. Topics covered include: religious liberty and toleration, secularization, the rise of African-American churches, the Civil War, national identity and the Protestant establishment, the religious politics of women's rights, religion and the market, the Cold War, the civil rights movement, the religious left and right, debates over church-state separation, constructions of religious pluralism, and religion after 9/11. 3 units. Same as home course L57 RelPol 225.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 225A

Register via WebStac

L98-234A: American Religion and the Politics of Sincerity

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Charles McCrary

Description

In the United States, most people assume that to be religious one should be sincere. You should really believe what you say you believe; don't fake it. Since the mid-twentieth century, courts have used the "sincerity test" for religious claimants, evaluating whether they truly believe, not whether their beliefs are true. In the twenty-first century, state legislators have passed laws protecting citizens' "sincerely held religious belief." This course explores these issues of religion, sincerity, and authenticity in American politics and culture. It is not a chronological survey but, rather, a topically organized introduction to some key questions and issues. We will pay particular attention to how racial, gender, national, and religious identities intersect to inform American ideas about sincerity, authenticity, and "realness." These discussions connect directly to how the law has treated religious believers and the matter of "sincerely held religious belief." Finally, we will consider how sincerity might help us think about the problems of deliberative democracy and the public sphere in our supposedly "post-truth era." 3 units. Same as home course L57 RelPol 234.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 234A

Register via WebStac

F20-2366 section 01: History of Advertising

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Oros

Description

Same as F20 1366, 3366, 4366 - Sophomores (only) register for F20 2366.  The historical, cultural and technological development of advertising in America from the colonial period to the present. This lecture course examines, through various media forms, key advertisements and campaigns, the creatives who made them, the

technologies used to create them and changes in our culture that advertising both influences and reflects. Grading is based on mid-term and final exams as well as optional, extra-credit five page essays.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

Fine Art (Sam Fox) F20 2366

Register via WebStac

L98-242: Religious Dissent and Reform in American Life

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Aaron Griffith

Description

This course explores American religious and political history with particular attention to themes of dissent and reform. From Anne Hutchinson's challenges to the puritan establishment in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, to evangelical abolition movements in the nineteenth century, to arguments for a "black Jesus" and civil rights in the 1960s, American religion is full of trailblazers that push political boundaries and contest religious orthodoxies. This course attends to themes of gender, race, class, and economic power to contextualize movements and give students tools to understand the arrival of new movements and the cultural and political power of religious ideas. This course pays particular attention to the role of religious dissenters in movements for social and political change, how religious beliefs and practices have been mobilized (often against co-religionists) to protest the economic status quo, empower women, promote civil rights, and end war. We also examine how many of these movements were themselves disrupted or complicated through further dissension and division. 3 units. Same as home course L57 RelPol 242.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 242

Register via WebStac

L98-245: Images of Disability in Film and Literature

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Kniepmann

Description

This course will critically examine the portrayal of persons with disabilities in literature and film, exploring how those images either shape or mimic general public impressions. We will discuss the implications of messages from the media on American responses to people with disabilities, as well as formulating strategies for promoting positive, inclusive messages. Perspectives from social science, health care, communications and other fields will provide frameworks for analysis. Literature will include fiction, biography and autobiography in books, essays, drama, poetry and short stories. Selections from fictional, educational, and documentary films will be reviewed during the semester. We will also investigate images in newspapers, magazines and advertising. Credit for this course is subject to the degree requirement that stipulates a 30-unit limit for courses taught by professional schools or University College. 3 units. Same as home course L43 GeSt 249.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 245

Register via WebStac

L98-251: Topics: Juvenile Justice in the Black Experience

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Ward

Description

This course examines the socio-legal past, present, and future of American juvenile justice, with a focus on the black American experience. The course is organized in three parts. Part I surveys the late 19th and early 20th century development of the "parental state" including its institutional centerpiece (the juvenile court), and principle legal subjects ("dependents" and "delinquents"), and how these took shape alongside the contemporaneous rise of American Apartheid. Part II examines several key changes and challenges in contemporary juvenile justice, including the transformation of this institution in the wake of the Civil Rights Movement, and the endurance of racialized juvenile social control in the post-Civil Rights period. Finally, Part III considers possible futures of youth justice in the United States and beyond, and practical strategies for achieving equal protection within and beyond law. 3 units. Same as home course L90 AFAS 251.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 251

Register via WebStac

L98-253: Sports & Society: Histories of American Sports

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Cohan

Description

Commercialized spectator sports are a hugely influential part of American culture, politics, and economics. Yet the story of how they got that way is too often assumed to be straightforward and self-evident. In this course we will complicate such assumptions: examining the complex cultural web of American sports history and exploring the people, power structures, and social contexts in which our athletic games have developed, from the Civil War to the present. We will pay particular attention to matters of gender and race in traversing these histories, and students will be asked to consider the ramifications of sociocultural development in sports for American culture at large, and vice versa. Among the topics in sport we will consider in detail are amateurism, commercialization, masculinity, mass mediation, and violence. We will analyze particular athletes of significance from the last 150 years, including Jack Johnson, Althea Gibson, Muhammad Ali, Serena Williams, Michael Jordan, and others. At the same time, we will examine the forms of media that shape our narratives and understandings of the competitions we consume. In addition, we will consider transnational competitions like the Olympics that bring American conflicts over race and gender into a global context. No prior sports knowledge is necessary to enroll in the class. Students put themselves on the waitlist and will be enrolled manually by the Registrar. 5 seats are reserved for each class year for a total of 20 students. This course is affiliated with "Sports & Society: Culture, Power, and Identity," an American Culture Studies program initiative focused on the intersections of athletics, identity, and social power. "Histories of American Sports" is the first part of a two-course sequence. The second part, "Sports & Society: Contemporary Issues in American Sports," will be offered in Fall 2019. As part of both courses, faculty affiliates of the Sports & Society Initiative will be invited to give the occasional guest lecture on topics relevant to their research. In addition, students will attend an academic talk, organized by the initiative, at which American sports history and culture will be considered by an outside speaker. 3 units.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Register via WebStac

L98-266: Topics in Sequential Art: Understanding Comics: An Introduction to Sequential Artistry

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Coogan

Description

Comics are a medium of their own-words and pictures, but more than that. Comics rely on the reader decoding and connecting a multilayered series of relationships. But even more than that, comics are a visual language. As Neil Cohn says, "Just as words in sequence are used in spoken language, sequences of images can create a visual language." In this course, you will learn to read that language, and to see how it operates and can be used across visual media and visual culture as a medium of visual communication, particularly our multimodal digital culture. Understanding comics can work as a base for interrogating how other forms of visual culture use sequence to create meaning, including through visual rhetoric. This course covers how to read comics, how sequential artistry creates meaning in comics, and how comics are constructed via a range of artistic, commercial, industrial, and cultural conversations between creators, producers, and audiences. The course offers (but does not require) opportunities to create expository sequential artistry-to write paper in comics form. Texts include works like Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics, Watchmen, Asterios Polyp, When I Am King, and visual journalism such as "Welcome to the New World." 3 units.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Register via WebStac

L98-270A: Native American Religions and Politics

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Dana Lloyd

Description

This course introduces students to American Indian religions and politics. We will think of American Indian religiosity as tied together with a strong sense of place and a long history of oppression. To do so, we will employ an interdisciplinary approach, reading historical, ethnographic, legal, and literary texts about Native American experiences of contact, conquest, genocide, and struggles for religious freedom and land rights. We will discuss political and legal controversies around a 1920s ceremonial Pueblo dance and the relationship between the Ghost Dance and the Red Power Movement; a US Supreme Court case about the ceremonial use of peyote in the Native American Church and an ethnography of Native American Alcoholics Anonymous. We will watch documentary films about various relationships between White Christian Americans and American Indians and ask how Native American experiences and accounts can help us to better understand (and also to criticize) Western religiosity, history, ecology, and politics. 3 units. Same as home course L57 RelPol 270.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
War & Peace

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 270A

Register via WebStac

L98-2910: Alternative Facts: An Introduction to the Social Construction of Reality

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Schachter

Description

Intro to the concept of social construction-the idea that our 'objective' reality is shaped by our social positions and through social interactions. Recent political events and social conflicts highlight deep divisions in American society, raising critical questions about the media and objectivity (e.g., alternative facts and 'fake' news), networks and segregation (e.g., who talks to whom), who gets to decide what is viewed as `truth,' and the role of researchers and academia in combating (or contributing to) misinformation. This course explores these questions with a sociological lens. We will use foundational sociological theories to learn how to recognize the existence of multiple realities, and consider the implications of social constructionism for key domains of everyday life, American politics, and the production of knowledge. We will also discuss the ways that cutting-edge technological innovations and academic research can-or cannot-help us distinguish facts from 'alternative' facts. Introductory level, no prerequisites. 3 units. Same as home course L40 SOC 2910.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 2910

Register via WebStac

L98-297: Undergraduate Internship in American Culture Studies

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Description

Students receive credit for a faculty-directed and approved internship. Registration requires completion of the Learning Agreement, which the student obtains from the College Office. The Learning Agreement must be filled out and signed by the College Office, faculty sponsor, and site supervisor prior to beginning internship work. Credit should correspond to actual time spent in work activities, e.g., 8-10 hours a week for thirteen or fourteen weeks to receive 3 units of credit; 1 or 2 credits for fewer hours. Students may not receive credit for work done for pay but are encouraged to obtain written evaluations about such work for the student's academic advisor and career placement file. Credit variable, max 3 units.

Credit Hours

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-298: Directed Fieldwork in American Culture Studies

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

TBA

Description

Fieldwork under the direction of an AMCS-affiliated faculty. All proposals for study must be submitted for review and approved by the AMCS advisor. See the AMCS website for the appropriate form. By permission of instructor. Credit variable, max 3 units.

Credit Hours

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-3000: Overseas Research in American Culture Studies

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

TBA

Description

Overseas research under the direction of an AMCS-affiliated faculty. All proposals for study must be submitted for review and approved by the AMCS advisor. See the AMCS website for the appropriate form. By permission of instructor. Credit variable, max 3 units.

Credit Hours

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-3002: Directed Study in Legal Culture

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

TBA

Description

Directed study with an AMCS-affiliated faculty. All proposals for study must be submitted for review and approved by the AMCS advisor. See the AMCS website for the appropriate form. By permission of instructor. Credit variable, max 3 units.

Credit Hours

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-3006: Local Archives: Directed Study in St. Louis

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

TBA

Description

Directed study with an AMCS-affiliated faculty. Research based on previously listed AMCS 3778: "Another Country: Land, Diaspora, and the Vernacular Beyond the Cities." By permission of instructor. Credit variable, max 3 units.

Credit Hours

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-3016: The Politics of Kanye West: Sonic Genius and Monster Aesthetics

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

McCune

Description

As a hip-hop artist Kanye West has had unprecedented impact on the sonic force of music, fashion, politics, and videography. Coupling his controversial moments, with his corpus of musical texts with special focus on sonic production, this course illuminates "Mr. West" as a case studey for interrogating the interplay between fame, gender, sexuality, and race. Mostly, we explore how racialized ways of doing iconography, complex ways of seeing, creates a distorted or reductive frame through which we see the black and famous. Nonetheless, the course oscillates with entertaining these nuances, while being entertained by the decade-long catalogue of music and visual imagery. Together, we extract the "Politics of Mr. West" in his music and life, while also illuminating the importance of a politics of genius-making in the larger arc of black pop culture tradition. 3 units. Same as home course L90 AFAS 3010.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 3016

Register via WebStac

L98-301B: Individual and Community

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Darnell

Description

What social, political, and cultural forces shape the individuality of people and yet make them part of not just one community but many, each of which is greater than the sum of the individuals that comprise it? What role do families and friends fill in this process? We explore answers to these questions by reading theories and case studies that try to explain the foundations of individuals' sense of self and the interdependence and responsibilities of individuals, families, and communities to one another. Cases we read highlight (1) how family and communal experiences (like school) influence individuals and (2) how virtual (online) and non-virtual communities are structured and sustained as social entities. In addition to readings, the class will rely on guests from the "real world" as well as field trips into virtual and non-virtual communities. AMCS Majors may count this course for Fieldwork credit with permission of instructor; a supplemental assignment might be required. 3 units. Same as L18 URST 3010.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 01: The American School

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Rowhea Elmesky

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: the differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers; the changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family; and the policy issues and arguments that have shaped the development of schooling in America. 3 units. Same as home course L12 Educ 301C.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 301C

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 02: The American School

Semester

SP2019

Section

02

Instructor

Judy Lamb

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: the differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers; the changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family; and the policy issues and arguments that have shaped the development of schooling in America. 3 units. Same as home course L12 Educ 301C.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 301C

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 03: The American School

Semester

SP2019

Section

03

Instructor

Madonna Riesenmy

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: the differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers; the changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family; and the policy issues and arguments that have shaped the development of schooling in America. 3 units. Same as home course L12 Educ 301C.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 04: The American School

Semester

SP2019

Section

04

Instructor

Rowhea Elmesky

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: the differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers; the changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family; and the policy issues and arguments that have shaped the development of schooling in America. 3 units. Same as home course L12 Educ 301C.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 05: The American School

Semester

SP2019

Section

05

Instructor

Michelle Purdy

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: the differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers; the changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family; and the policy issues and arguments that have shaped the development of schooling in America. 3 units. Same as home course L12 Educ 301C.

SECT 05: In this particular section, we analyze the course themes through the context of U.S. educational history and U.S. social history. Our analysis is framed by the purposes of schooling and contemporary issues in U.S. schooling, but we spend considerable time studying the history of schooling as we examine enduring challenges and dilemmas that define the relationship between schooling and society including, but not limited to, the following: access to schooling; school experiences; inequality, in particular systemic racial inequality; and policy. Prerequisite:This section is primarily for sophomores and juniors. Seniors may be enrolled per permission of the instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 301C

Register via WebStac

L98-3023: Jazz in American Culture

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Burke

Description

This course will address the role of jazz within the context of twentieth-century African American and American cultural history, with particular emphasis on the ways in which jazz has shaped, and has been shaped by, ideas about race, gender, economics, and politics. We will make use of recordings and primary sources from the 1910s to the present in order to address the relationship between jazz performances and critical and historical thinking about jazz. This course is not a survey, and students should already be familiar with basic jazz history. PREREQ: Music 105 or permission of instructor. 3 units. Same as home course L27 Music 3023.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 3023

Register via WebStac

L98-3026: Home, Bittersweet Home: Histories of Housing and Homeownership in America since 1850

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Repice

Description

The idea of owning one's own home has been central to realizations of the American dream or the "good life." By 1931, Herbert Hoover called the idea "a sentiment deep in the heart of our race and of American life." While the dream continues, the reality of homeownership has been elusive or fraught with struggle and sacrifice for many Americans. If home ownership is such a central part of American identity, why have so many generations of Americans struggled to achieve it? In this course, we explore the histories of different versions of home and homeownership by touching down in different locations at pivotal moments in order to investigate the varied meanings of housing and homeownership in the context of a particular place and time in American history. Using a case-study approach, the course travels across time and space to explore diverse forms of housing, including the following: the big house and slave house in the south under slavery, the immigrant tenement in New York City, the company town in south Chicago, the Midwest homestead, the planned postwar suburban neighborhood, high rise public housing and gated communities. This format exposes students to the important role of federal and local policies as well as themes of housing including: homes as private and domestic realms; housing as a commodity and the largest form of American debt; housing as an icon and encoder of social status; housing as exclusionary and inclusionary; housing as racial or socio-economic discrimination; the suburbs and their discontents; and the recent housing crisis. 3 units. Same as L22 History 3026.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac

L98-302A section 01: The Great American Novel

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Maciak

Description

What is the Great American Novel? This is a question that has been hotly debated for decades, from Harriet Beecher Stowe to Ralph Ellison, William Faulkner to Toni Morrison. It's a question with a hundred answers and no answers at all-a question of taste, of prejudice, of time. But what is a "Great American Novel"? What does it look like? What do we expect of it? What have Americans throughout history wanted it to say about America? These are questions we can, and will, answer in this course. As elusive a thing as the Great American Novel has been, the idea of the Great American Novel has a long and fascinating history that mirrors all the major movements of American literature from the American Renaissance to the present. Piecing together the story of this dream, this cultural quest with all of its inclusions and exclusions, is a way of telling a shadow history of American society. The Great American Novel tradition is something like a fossil record of America's shifting norms in relation to race, gender, sexuality, domesticity, democracy, citizenship, immigration, labor, capitalism, and war. And so each presumptive Great American Novel is a new variation in an evolving genre and a new thesis statement of American grandiosity or guilt. By cataloguing shared themes, conventions, and preoccupations, and by paying close attention to a handful of likely-and unlikely-candidates, this course will big questions about American exceptionalism, American tragedy, and the role of art in American culture. Authors will likely include Harriet Beecher Stowe, Herman Melville, Edith Wharton, William Faulkner, Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture

Program Attributes

Same As

American Culture Studies L98 302A

Register via WebStac

L98-307A: Recipes for Respect: Black Foodways in the United States

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Zafar

Description

This course will illustrate the ways that African Americans have interacted with the farmed environment, domestic service, and cookery to gain social mobility and civil rights. At least one site/community/restaurant space in St. Louis exemplary of the issues surrounding Black foodways will be examined as a way to understand food-its production, its preparation and its distribution-as expressive culture and means of social justice. 3 units. Same as home course L90 AFAS 3075.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 307A

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L98-3101 section 01: Topics in Anthropology: Sense of Place: St. Louis

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Murray

Description

Where is home? How do you know where you're from? Our points of origin (cultural, linguistic, geographic) often shape our life trajectories by telling us who we are and where we belong. The embodied ways we move through the world, and our experiential relationships to particular places (in both the built and natural environment) also influence our sense of shared history and community. At the same time, the asymmetrical acceleration of travel and communication technologies has produced a globalized world that invites us to redefine the scale and scope of our neighborhoods. With the potential to be everywhere and nowhere at the same time, how/do we maintain a sense of place? Anthropologists ask how and why certain places come to hold strong and lasting meaning to people.  Together, we will study localization and placemaking practices through close ethnographic readings and with site visits to marked places, non-places, and contested spaces throughout the St. Louis area. This course explores the creativity and politics of place to ask, anew, what it means to be human in the early twenty-first century.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Same As

American Culture Studies L98 3101

Register via WebStac

L98-310B section 01: Topics in Anthropology: Caribbean Island Vulnerabilities: A Case Study of Puerto Rico

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Murray

Description

Tropical and subtropical islands have long been imagined as a tourist's paradise, replete with pleasures of sun, surf, sand, and sex. At the same time, long histories of colonization, exploitation, resource extraction, and slavery have produced a very different reality for many residents of islands located in and around the Caribbean Sea. More recently, communities in the Caribbean region have been subject to extreme weather events that bring the current politics of climate change into conversation with centuries-old problems related to economic isolation, infrastructure, human poverty, and ecological vulnerability. This course explores the nature of island disasters, both sudden and slow, by examining ethnographically the global histories that today inform "Caribbeanness" and the politics of everyday island life. We will further analyze the impact of media coverage on North American understandings of The Caribbean through a close examination of Puerto Rico.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

Anthropology L48 3103

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L98-3131: Topics in English Literature: Ocean, Island, Ghetto, Globe: An Introduction to Asian American Lit

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Le-Khac

Description

Where do Asian Americans belong? This question has long been a problem for Asian Americans. The disparate routes Asian migrants took to the U.S. tie their stories "here" to a "there" overseas. Meanwhile, their places here in the U.S. have been ambivalent: embraced as model minorities but also excluded as racial others, foreigners, even potential traitors. Out of this history comes a literature that wrestles with the problem of place and setting. From fiction to poetry to graphic novels, this course will introduce us to the range of Asian American literature and stretch our ideas of what it can be and where it can travel. Through this literature, we'll examine how Asian Americans have imagined their horizons of belonging when their places in the nation and world are unclear. We'll journey from familiar Asian American settings-Chinatown, the island, the Asia-Pacific-to less familiar ones-the American hemisphere, the trans-Atlantic, global utopias, fantasy worlds. Across these diverse settings, Asian American literature questions where and why we draw the boundaries of community, identity, and political responsibility in an increasingly migrant world. Authors may include Monique Truong, Frank Chin, Rishi Reddi, Marjorie Liu, Cathy Park Hong, and Ruth Ozeki. Satisfies the Twenthieth Century and later requirement. 3 units. Same as home course L14 E Lit 313.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 3131

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L98-315A: Topics in American Literature: The Novel as History, History as a Novel

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Milder

Description

Norman Mailer titled his book on the 1967 anti-war march on the Pentagon "Armies of the Night: History as a Novel, the Novel as History." The main title, taken from Matthew Arnold's poem "Dover Beach," refers to the physical and moral confusion of war and of warring historical forces generally; the subtitle suggests more than the status of Mailer's book as a historical novel. History is itself a "novel," Mailer implies, filled with sometimes larger than life characters and taking on meaning only as it is told and retold by successive interpreters. The novel is "history" in that it belongs to and reflects its times and, insofar as it impresses itself on the minds of its readers, contributes to the making of history. The course will explore several novelists' constructions of American history through the 1970s. Readings will likely include William Faulkner's "Absalom, Absalom!," a microcosmic history of the South from ante-bellum times through the early 20th century; selections from John Dos Passos's epic "U.S.A"; Philip Roth's counterfactual "The Plot Against America," which imagines a Fascist takeover of the country; Don DeLillo's 'Libra," a fiction about Lee Harvey Oswald and the Kennedy Assassination; Mailer's "Armies of the Night," a record of and meditation on the turbulence of the late 1960s: Toni Morrison's 'Song Of Solomon," a saga of the Afro-American experience across most of a century; and possibly E. L. Doctorow's "Ragtime," an inventive tragicomedy about race and culture early in the early 1900s. Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement. 3 units. Same as home course L14 E Lit 315.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 315A

Register via WebStac

L98-3161: Topics in English and American Lit: Black Militancy in the American Imagination

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Gradert

Description

"Remember Nat Turner," wrote Frederick Douglass as he recruited black soldiers for the Union war effort. Urging men to enlist in the very military that had once opposed Turner the slave rebel, Douglass captured the tensions of black militancy in American culture from the 18th century to Martin and Malcolm. This course examines how black writers negotiated their relationship with the United States within and against its military as well as the threat and potential of black militancy within a white imagination, from early fears of slave revolts to later efforts at enlisting black soldiers in American wars. Readings begin in the American and Haitian Revolutions and end in 1969 with a novel about an ex-CIA spy who leads a black power revolution. Works include the confession of Nat Turner, Herman Melville's dark tale of a slave mutiny, the diary of a soldier in the renowned Massachusetts 54th Colored Regiment (featured in the film Glory), "General" Harriet Tubman, Frank Capra's WWII propaganda film "The Negro Soldier," and a novel about a wounded veteran who hallucinates his way through African American military history from the Revolution to Vietnam. 3 units. Same as home course L14 E Lit 3161.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
War & Peace

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 3161

Register via WebStac

L98-3182: Topics in American Literature: The Cultural History of the American Teenager

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Shipe

Description

This course will explore the recent history of the teenager in the United States, from the rise of teen culture in the 1950s to the current state of adolescence in the new century. Why have so many novels and films memorialized adolescence? How has the period of development been portrayed in recent American fiction? How have depictions and attitudes toward teen culture changed over the past fifty years? We will begin with J.D. Salinger's classic novel of adolescence alienation, "The Catcher in the Rye," a book that in many ways helped initiate the rise of the youth movement in the 1950s and 60s. From there, we will read a series of novels and historical studies that will trace the changes in teen culture that have occurred over the past half century. Our class will also consider a few films, such as "Rebel Without a Cause" and "Dazed and Confused," which have helped shape our conception of the American teenager. Ultimately, we will question what these depictions of teen culture can tell us about larger trends and concerns in American life. Possible readings include John Updike's "The Centaur," Suzanne Collins's "The Hunger Games," and Colson Whitehead's "Sag Harbor." Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement. 3 units. Same as home course L14 E Lit 318.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 3182

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L98-3190 section 01: The Material World of Modern Segregation: St. Louis in the Long Era of Ferguson

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Bernstein and Kolk

Description

Busch Stadium. The Intersection of Skinker and Forest Park Parkway, in front of Kayak's. The Ferguson Quik-Trip. The MUNY in Forest Park. The ruins of a Trolley Pavilion in Wellston. The Metrolink Stop at the Galleria. An Empty Lot in East St. Louis where a theater was burned a hundred years ago. The Swipe-Card Access Panel on Your Dormitory. This course will invite students to engage such sites-and many others-as points of departure for an exploration of how we as St. Louisans live our racialized lives. We will focus on places where racialized experience is at once densely concentrated and not fully revealed--hiding in plain sight. For instance, the daily encounters in front of Kayak's take on deeper significance when one considers that this site is the fraught boundary between St. Louis County and St. Louis City in a racialized break dating back to the end of Reconstruction. The course gives special attention to the deep structures of history, law, culture and politics that an intensive engagement with such sites makes accessible. But we are not only interested in the lessons of history: we seek to learn from direct encounters with the physical sites and their local contexts. We will take several trips to sites in the St. Louis region.   Readings will include materials on racialized urban experience and more specific texts related to course sites, and will include visual and material culture. Students will develop individual projects on their own sites under instructors' supervision, and will interact with other faculty who have also been engaged in site-specific research on segregation, some of whom will serve as guest contributors for our class sessions. The course aspires to discover and cultivate new ways of seeing and understanding.  25 students will be admitted into the course.  Sophomore standing or permission by instructors required for enrollment.   Some field trips may extend beyond the end of class time, until 6:30 p.m..   Students will be notified of the field trip schedule well in advance.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
A Sense of Place
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK
MD

Register via WebStac

L98-3203: Civic Scholars Program Semester Two: Civic Engagement in Action

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Kouo

Schipma

Description

This is the second semester, foundation course for students in the Civic Scholars Program of the Gephardt Institute for Public Service. This course provides students with a context for developing their civic projects. Students engage in a semester long research and project planning process tied to their civic projects. Through research, lectures, workshops, and presentations, students develop a project proposal for their civic projects. Students meet in class to discuss concepts, engage in critical reflection, and develop l skills. This is a two-credit course. Prereq: L98 3202. Civic Scholars courses do not count towards the AMCS Major and Minor. 2 units.

Credit Hours

2

Weekly Schedule

Th 4:00-6:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-3231: Sex, Drugs, and Rock N Roll: American Culture in Revolt: 1960-1970

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Schvey

Description

During the turbulent, exhilarating and dangerous decade of the Sixties, American Theatre radically changed course and came alive in new ways. The war in Viet Nam, the Kennedy and MLK Assassinations, Black Power, an emerging drug culture, and the Sexual Revolution all created an extraordinary impact on both America's social fabric and its cultural life. The theatrical response to this cultural upheaval, in particular, emphasized the use of ritual and movement rather than individual authorship and traditional language; instead of domestic drama, there was rage; instead of realism, there was experiment. This vibrant, controversial decade saw the appearance of controversial, landmark plays (Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?) and musicals (Hair, Oh! Calcutta!), as well as the birth of the Off-Broadway (and Off-Off Broadway) theatre movements. While our course will concentrate heavily on experimental theatre, we will also consider the changing cultural scene in film, dance, the visual arts (Pop Art), and popular music. This exciting period forever altered our vision of the arts in American culture. 3 units. Same as home course L15 Drama 323.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 3231

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L98-329F: Tale of Two Cities: Documenting Our Divides

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Ward-Brown

Description

The St Louis metropolitan area is teaming with organizations and people who are actively demanding justice and equality in civil rights, housing, gender equality, the climate/environment, education, economics and resource distribution. This class offers students the opportunity to partner and engage with one of these non-violent direct-action interventions, youth driven social protests or grassroots revitalization groups as a researcher and documentarian. Successful completion of this course involves possible off-campus filming of interviews, street events and meetings. These interactions generate the narrative to create a short video with a distinctive perspective and point of view. Students may work individually or in teams. Skills will be developed in the fundamentals of story development, video and audio-capture in-the-field, editing with Adobe Premier and archival preservation. No prerequisites. 3 units. Lab, materials fee: $50.00. Same as home course I50 INTER D 329F.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 1:00-4:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK
MD

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 329F

Register via WebStac

L98-3301: History of American Cinema

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Paul

Description

This course will survey the major economic and social developments in the history of American cinema, from its origins in the late 19th century through its continued, albeit radically altered, existence in the 21st century. We will begin with the earliest days of the U.S. film industry, tracing its growth as well as changes in modes of production and organizing structures that allowed it to become the dominant global force in the making and mass marketing of movies. We will explore mainstream American film's relationship to existing and emergent realms of culture and media as well as to expectations regarding its role and responsibilities as a "public entertainment" denied First Amendment protection until 1952. Film style and form do not constitute the major focus of this course, but we will approach a number of films with attention to style and form in order to understand how cultural, economic, industrial, aesthetic, and technological determinants have impacted American filmmaking as a blend of art and commerce. By the end of this course, you will have a detailed knowledge of the history of American cinema, the individuals and institutional processes that have shaped it, the most important challenges and milestones that have marked it, and the aesthetic forms and socio-cultural effects that have been attributed to it. Priority given to majors and minors. REQUIRED SCREENING: Mondays @ 7 pm. 3 units. Same as home course L53 Film 330.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

WF 3:00-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 3301

Register via WebStac

L98-3340 section 01: A History of the Golden Age of Children's Literature

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Pawl

Description

A survey of Golden Age texts for children from "Alice in Wonderland" to "The Secret Garden." British and American, 1865-1914. Fiction, drama, poetry. In this course we will examine a remarkable period in the history of children's literature. The texts we read will cover a broad range of genres, from domestic fiction to fantasy literature to stories of adventure. The settings include the British nursery, the American small town, the plains of Africa, and a rabbit hole. The depictions of and assumptions about children that emerge from these disparate texts will guide our investigation of the period's concept of childhood. Students will be encouraged to take a fresh look at works whose familiarity and/or iconic status have in the past exempted them from serious analysis. Authors will include Alcott, Carroll, Barrie, Baum, Burnett, Nesbit, Stevenson and Twain. Critical readings accompany each text. Satisfies the Nineteenth Century requirement. 3 units. Same as home course L14 E Lit 334.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Early America

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 3340

Register via WebStac

L98-3340 section 02: A History of the Golden Age of Children's Literature

Semester

SP2019

Section

02

Instructor

Pawl

Description

A survey of Golden Age texts for children from "Alice in Wonderland" to "The Secret Garden." British and American, 1865-1914. Fiction, drama, poetry. In this course we will examine a remarkable period in the history of children's literature. The texts we read will cover a broad range of genres, from domestic fiction to fantasy literature to stories of adventure. The settings include the British nursery, the American small town, the plains of Africa, and a rabbit hole. The depictions of and assumptions about children that emerge from these disparate texts will guide our investigation of the period's concept of childhood. Students will be encouraged to take a fresh look at works whose familiarity and/or iconic status have in the past exempted them from serious analysis. Authors will include Alcott, Carroll, Barrie, Baum, Burnett, Nesbit, Stevenson and Twain. Critical readings accompany each text. Satisfies the Nineteenth Century requirement. 3 units. Same as home course L14 E Lit 334.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Early America

Program Attributes

Same As

Register via WebStac

L98-336: Topics in American Culture Studies: Reading American Fan Cultures

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Cohan

Description

The contemporary experience of social media leaves no doubt: we live in an age of fans. Articulating the entertainments and activities one is a "fan" of is a primary means by which we articulate our identities. But how did we get here? And what does it really mean to call oneself a fan? This multidisciplinary course will attempt to answer these questions by reading fans-comparing and critiquing how authors and academics have depicted fans of music, movies, sports, and even literature itself. Doing so, we will further ask: should we think of fans as a distinct category of people? Or do we all possess fandoms that we exhibit to varying degrees, consciously or unconsciously? To what extent is fandom personal or subject to the whims of a crowd? Is there something particular about American fandoms that distinguish them in a global context? Select critical readings will help us to further contextualize the fan's place in American culture, as well as the role of race, gender, and sexuality in fan reception and socialization. Finally, we will examine the characteristic differences between narrative representations and academic accounts of fandom in order to consider the creative and critical processes that inform fan identity. 3 units. Same as L66 ChSt 3361, L12 Educ 326.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac

L98-3360: Topics in American Culture Studies: Passing Time: Contested Racial Boundaries in Modern Am Culture

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Thurman

Description

From Nella Larsen's classic Harlem Renaissance novel Passing (1929) to Jordan Peele's Oscar-winning thriller Get Out (2017), racial crossing, exchange, and intermixture remain a preoccupation in American culture. But who can cross racial boundaries, and who cannot? What motivates a person to leave behind one identity and take up another? And how have Americans at different time periods differentiated an authentic identity from a false one? This course explores these questions through an interdisciplinary archive of sources from history, literature, film, journalism, law, and philosophy. Tracing shifting conceptions of race, gender, and sexuality across the 20th and 21st centuries, we will consider how the practice of passing has changed over time and the ways in which it continues to shape contemporary ideas about identity categories. We will examine the costs and benefits of situating ideas like immigrant assimilation and cultural appropriation in relation to passing, as well as the uses and the limitations of thinking comparatively about racial passing and gender or sexuality passing. Our discussions will make use of a diverse set of scholarly and popular sources, including works from Langston Hughes, Audre Lorde, Michael Jackson, Octavia Butler, and Alison Bechdel. 3 units. Same as L14 E Lit 3360, L57 RelPol 3360, L18 URST 3366.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

F20-338A section 01: Enchanted Objects: Material Culture

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Kolk

Description

Some objects are 'magical,' possessing a kind of allure that leads to spend money we don't have, collective obsessively, or behave differently. Other are 'dangerous,' 'taboo,' inspiring disturbing thoughts or action. This course considers our complex relationship to things, exploring their powers of enchantment, which cannot be separated from their status as commodities, or what Marx called crystallized labor and creative energy. What gives objects potency, value, significance? What social-psychological and political purposes, regimes of commodification and power, do they serve? Engaging in discussion and object studies, we will draw upon work from many fields, creative and scholarly.  Please email the instructor and communicate your interest in taking it for AMCS credit. Given potentially strong demand for the course among Sam Fox students (this course is home-based in Sam Fox), AMCS students will be admitted if space allows and in consideration of the student’s fit for the course (area of research, concentration area, etc.).

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac

L98-341A: Gender in Society

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Collins

Description

Intro to the sociological study of gender. The primary focus is U.S. society, but we will also discuss gender in an international context. From the moment of birth, boys and girls are treated differently. Gender structures the experiences of people in all major social institutions, including the family, the workplace, and schools. We will explore how gender impacts lives and life chances. The central themes of the course are historical changes in gender beliefs and practices; socialization practices that reproduce gender identities; how race/ethnicity, class, and sexuality shape the experience of gender; and the relationship between gender, power, and social inequality. Prereq: introductory course in sociology or consent of the instructor. 3 units. Same as home course L40 SOC 3410.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 341A

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L98-342A: James Baldwin: Life, Letters & Legacy

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Manditch-Prottas

Description

In his 1972 essay No Name in the Street James Baldwin recounts that he could never in good conscience just write, because he had never been just a writer. Indeed, Baldwin saw himself as a "public witness to the situation of black people," compelled to speak truth to power in whatever form he deemed necessary. Baldwin as: black, gay, man, American, author, activist, and so much more, has served as an essential figure in theorizing alterities of the presumed rigidity of these very concepts. In this respect, this course will center Baldwin the thinker as much as Baldwin the author. We will examine his classic novels and essays as well as his work across many less-examined domains - theatre, sermon, dialogue, film, short story. Moreover, while committing ourselves to close reading methods, we will situate Baldwin's works within socio-historical context and consider how he shaped, and was shaped by, events beginning with the Civil Rights Era through our precarious contemporary moment in which he remains, often tragically, a timely voice. 3 units. Same as home course L90 AFAS 3422.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 342A

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L98-343: Constitutional Law

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Epstein

Description

This course provides an introduction to federal constitutional law. Topics covered include the theory and practice of judicial review, the powers of the branches of the federal government, and the relationship between the states and the federal government. 3 units. Same as home course L32 Pol Sci 3431.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 343

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L98-346A: The Politics of Privacy in the Digital Age

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Darnell

Description

This course explores the changing nature of privacy in contemporary society. UN charters and many national constitutions guarantee citizens a right to privacy, but what does this mean in an age of information-gathering and the increasing ability to track individuals' personal and public behavior? We will draw on theoretical and empirical studies in the law, political science, sociology, and communication studies to specify the important questions and debates faced by governments and citizens. 3 units. Same as home course L32 Pol Sci 3462.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 346A

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L98-351: History of Electronic Media: From Radio to Television to Digital

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Hilu

Description

This course traces the history of electronic media as they have become the dominant source for entertainment and information in contemporary culture, starting with over-the-air broadcasting of radio and television through to cable and the "narrowcasting" achieved by digital technologies. While some attention will be paid to other national industries, the chief focus of the course will be on electronic media in the United States to determine, in part, the transformative role they have played in the cultural life of the nation. The course will explore the relationship of the electronic media industries to the American film industry, determining how their interactions with the film industry helped mutually shape the productions of both film and electronic media. REQUIRED SCREENING: Tuesdays @ 7pm 3 units. Same as home course L53 Film 350.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 351

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L98-3561: Law, Gender, and Justice

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Appleton

Description

This course (formerly called "Women and the Law") explores how social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexuality have shaped traditional legal reasoning and American legal concepts, including women's legal rights. We will begin by placing our current legal framework, and its gender, race, sexuality, and other societal assumptions, in an historical and Constitutional context. We will then examine many of the questions raised by feminist theory, feminist jurisprudence, and other critical perspectives. For example, is the legal subject gendered male, and, if so, how can advocates (or women and men) use the law to gain greater equality? What paradoxes have emerged in areas such as employment discrimination, family law, or reproductive rights, as women and others have sought liberal equality? What is the equality/difference debate about and why is it important for feminists? How do intersectionality and various schools of feminist thought affect our concepts of discrimination, equality, and justice? The course is thematic, but we will spend time on key cases that have influenced law and policy, examining how they affect the everyday lives of women. Over the years, this course has attracted WGSS students and pre-law students. This course is taught by law students under the supervision of a member of the School of Law faculty. STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN L77 3561 WOMEN AND THE LAW CAN NOT TAKE THIS CLASS. 3 units. Same as home course L77 WGSS 3561.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

W 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 3561

Register via WebStac

L98-359A: (Re)Writing Slavery

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Zafar

Description

This special topics course will consider black-authored texts ranging from the 18th to the 21st century to examine the ways slavery has been discussed in American literature and culture. We will pay attention to the role of slavery in creating the African diaspora, the contribution of slave narratives to the Abolitionist movement, and how the structures of American slavery did not disappear after the Civil War. We will look at the ways Civil Rights-era and contemporary African American writers such as Margaret Walker, Toni Morrison, and Charles Johnson have appropriated the slave narrative to engage and critique present day concerns. Their works will be read against nineteenth century slave narratives by ex-slaves such as Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs. In addition to the texts, students will be asked to consider how slavery and its aftereffects have been portrayed in film and other forms of media. 3 units. Same as home course L90 AFAS 359.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 8:30-10:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 359A

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L98-361A: Women and Social Movements:Gender and Sexuality in US Social Movements

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Sangrey

Description

This course examines the history of grassroots activism and political engagement of women in the US. Looking at social movements organized by women or around issues of gender and sexuality, class texts interrogate women's participation in, and exclusion from, political life. Key movements organizing the course units include, among others: the Temperance Movement, Abolitionist Movements, the Women's Suffrage Movements, Women's Labor Movements, Women's Global Peace Movements, and Recent Immigration Movements. Readings and discussion will pay particular attention to the movements of women of color, as well as the critiques of women of color of dominant women's movements. Course materials will analyze how methods of organizing reflect traditional forms of "doing politics," but also strategies and tactics for defining problems and posing solutions particular to women. Prereqs: Any 100- or 200- level Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies course or permission from the instructor. 3 units. Same as home course L77 WGSS 361.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 361A

Register via WebStac

L98-3632: Mapping the World of "Black Criminality"

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Mustakeem

Description

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 3632

Register via WebStac

L98-365: The Birth Crisis of Democracy: The New Republic: The United States, 1776-1850

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Bernstein

Description

"Go get yourself some democracy!" Americans have so often preached to other nations. But just how did Americans themselves go about creating the world's largest and most successful democratic republic? And how democratic was this violent new nation that reeled from one crisis to another, and ultimately to the brink of collapse in its first seventy-five years? This survey of American history from the creation of the Republic to the eve of the Civil War explores the Revolution and its ambiguous legacies, the starkly paradoxical "marriage" of slavery and freedom, and the creation of much of the America that we know; mass political parties; a powerful Presidency; sustained capitalist growth; individualistic creeds; formalized and folkloric racism; heteronormative patriarchal family life; technological innovation; literary experimentation; distinctively American legal, scientific and religious cultures; and the modern movements of labor, feminism, and African-American empowerment. PREREQ: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. Modern, U.S. 3 units. Same as home course L22 History 365.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MWF 1:00-2:00

Concentration Areas

The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
War & Peace

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 365

Register via WebStac

L98-3703: Religion and the Origins of Capitalism

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Valeri

Description

This course explores the economic, cultural, and social history of the origins of Anglo-American capitalism from 1500 to 1800. Throughout we will discuss the worldviews and day-to-day business decisions of the merchants who created England's transatlantic market order and empire. Rather than treat early capitalism only in terms of material or purely economic dynamics, it probes the intellectual constructs that combined with commercial innovations to form capitalism into a social system. 3 units. Same as home course L57 RelPol 370.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 3703

Register via WebStac

L98-3755: Disability, Quality of Life & Community Responsibility

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Kniepmann

Description

The increasing prevalence of disability presents major challenges for American society. Social participation can be a challenge for people with disabilities, while resources to address these needs tend to be limited. This course will begin by critically analyzing concepts of disability, Quality of Life, health and social participation. We will construct a framework for examining social participation and community resources across the lifespan. Public health, educational and environmental theories and methods will be applied to programs and services that aim to enhance quality of life with disabilities. We will analyze ecological approaches to enhancing social participation. Upon completion of this course, students will be equipped to analyze challenges and prioritize resources for individual and population health. Credit for this course is subject to the degree requirement that stipulates a 30-unit limit for courses taught by professional schools or University College. 3 units. Same as home course L43 GeSt 375.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 3755

Register via WebStac

L98-375A: American Culture: Methods & Visions: Hot Takes: Cultural Criticism in the Digital Age

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Maciak

Description

The twenty-first century has seen a new and exciting wave of cultural criticism, and along with it a new wave of public intellectuals. Ta-Nehisi Coates, Roxane Gay, Jia Tolentino, Anne Helen Petersen, Daniel Mallory Ortberg, Wesley Morris-at their best, writers like these aspire to the sort of indispensability on political, social, and artistic matters that their forebears like Susan Sontag, Norman Mailer, and James Baldwin had at midcentury. But these voices are unique because they emerged through and alongside a specifically online critical sphere, a space betwixt and between the comments section and the little magazine. This is the space of viral tweets and threads, "hot takes" and "think-pieces." It's a space of potentially greater democratization and diversity even as it is an opportunity for bigots and trolls. These writers are beholden to their networks, but those networks are far wider, more idiosyncratic and inclusive and incendiary-more unstable-than anything buttressing the vaunted public intellectuals of the past. This course examines the cultural critics of the contemporary moment in context of the critical space they opened and now occupy. We'll begin with a quick history of the "public intellectual" from the eighteenth century to the present before we log on. The rise and fall of Gawker, Grantland, and The Awl; The New Republic's controversial digital pivot; the feminist communities of The Hairpin and The Toast; the conservative "intellectual dark web"; the message boards of the early 2000s; the emergence of semi-academic sites like the Los Angeles Review of Books; the blogs and tumblrs and livejournals that nurtured the talents and provocateurs that we now find indispensable or unavoidable. We will dissect their style, understand their theory and practice, engage with their subjects, and investigate the way their writing has intersected with and propelled social media movements like Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, and #OscarsSoWhite. And we will consider the way these critics have influenced the way scholars and students approach the texts and topics we always have. Students will write a series of short essays preparing for a final independent and multidisciplinary project. As a Writing Intensive course, AMCS 375A also serves as an occasion for students to think about matters of argument and presentation, and to develop ideas and models for future research. This course is intended for AMCS Juniors but all are welcome. Students will place themselves on the waitlist and then will be enrolled manually by the registrar, with priority given to AMCS majors and minors. This course fulfills the "multidisciplinary" (MD) requirement for Minors and fulfills the "Methods Seminar" requirements for Majors. American Culture Studies (AMCS) is a multidisciplinary program that provides both a broader context for study in different fields and a deeper understanding of American culture in all of its complexities. 3 units. Same as L15 Drama 3751.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac

L98-3785: Photography in America

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Miller

Description

This course will consider the practice and use of photography in America from its invention up to the present, offering various ways of thinking about the medium and its relation to society and culture. Students will come to understand the ways photographic practices shape public perceptions of national identity, ethnicity and gender, nature, democratic selves, and a host of other concerns. We will discuss famous practitioners such as Matthew Brady, Jacob Riis, Lewis Hine, Walker Evans, and Robert Frank. We consider not only the social and public uses of the medium through such episodes as the New Deal/FSA and photojournalism, but also the private explorations of 'fine art' photographers, and the everyday practices of the snapshot. Prereqs: Intro to Western (L01 112) or Intro to Modern (211), or one course in American History, American Cultural Studies, or permission of the instructor. 3 units. Same as home course L01 Art-Arch 3785.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 3785

Register via WebStac

L98-378A: Topics in IR: U.S. Law and Foreign Relations

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Caddel

Description

Since 9/11, many of the most controversial political debates in the US have originated foreign relations and national security. What is the proper balance of power between the president and Congress? How do we balance security and civil liberties? To what degree should international agreements constrain US policy choices? This course will examine both the legal and political answers to those questions. The course will mix a law school approach, with emphasis on reading and analyzing primary legal materials (judicial opinions, statutes, etc.), and a social science approach, with emphasis on empirical political science literature. Students will build skills in legal analysis and an understanding of the legal and political theories that shape US foreign relations and national security policy. 3 units. Same as home course L32 Pol Sci 378.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 8:30-10:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
War & Peace

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 378A

Register via WebStac

L98-378B: Contemporary American Theater

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

McGinley

Description

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK
MD

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 378B

Register via WebStac

L98-3832: Topics in Women, Gender, & Sexuality Studies: Spectacular Blackness, Race, Gender, & Visual Culture

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Wanzo

Description

Discourse about African American identity has been indelibly shaped by the nexus of language and visual representations that configure blackness as a deviant other to the West and U.S. citizenship. From racist caricature in travel narratives and pro-slavery tracts, to contemporary representations of "welfare queens" and "thugs," visual representations serve as allegedly transparent, and objective, examples of the perpetual and inevitable failure of people of African descent to be human. To combat these representations, many photographers, visual artists, and film and television producers have attempted to challenge and subvert this history of visual imperialism. Combatting this imperialism requires untangling the web of raced and gendered representations shaping what Patricia Hill Collins has called "controlling images" of African Americans-images such as Mammy, the pickaninny, Sapphire, Jezebel, the Welfare Queen, Coon, Sambo, Thug, and Man on the Down Low. At the same time, even discourses of respectability and "good" blackness can contribute to hegemony. In this course, we'll begin with representations of the slave in the 19th century and end with representations of (an always) gendered blackness in social media in order to explore the ways in which African American male and female identities have been shaped and resisted in visual culture. 3 units. Same as home course L77 WGSS 383.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 3832

Register via WebStac

L98-386A: Topics in African-American Literature: Rebels, Sheroes, and Race Men

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Description

This class/directed reading group will focus on approximately the first century of African American publications-of autobiographies and novels, manifestos and newspaper editorials. Although many works by early Black writers are now available in print-Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs spring instantly to mind-many more can be accessed through digital archives. We will survey a core group of printed texts, augmenting our readings via digital entities such as the Colored Conventions: Bringing Nineteenth-Century Black Organizing to Digital Life, Common-Place's Just Teach One: Early African American Print and the Digital Collections of the Schomburg Division of the New York Public Library. Assignments will include essays and/or digital/online projects. Some classes may meet in the library or the Digital Humanities Workshop. 3 units. Same as home course L90 AFAS 386A.

Credit Hours

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Early America
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 386A

Register via WebStac

L98-3880: Terror and Violence in the Black Atlantic

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Mustakeem

Description

From the period of bondage through the 21st century, terror and racialized violence have consistently been used as a form of social control. This course is constructed to explore the historical foundations of extreme threats of violence inflicted among populations of African descent. The fabric of American culture has given birth to its own unique brand of terrorism, of which this class spends considerable time interrogating. Yet, in recognizing that these practices are commonly found in other parts of the Black Atlantic, students will be encouraged to take a comparative view to better tease out the wider strands of violence operative in places like England, the Caribbean, and Latin America Within this course, we will explore the varied ways in which music, films, newspapers, and historical narratives shed light on these often life altering stories of the past. Some of the themes touched upon include: the use of punishment/exploitation during the era of slavery; lynching; sexual violence; race riots; police brutality; motherhood; black power; and community activism. 3 units. Same as home course L90 AFAS 3880.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 3880

Register via WebStac

L98-391: Gender Violence

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Ake

Description

This course will explore the issue of violence against women within families, by strangers in the workplace, and within the context on international and domestic political activity. In each area, issues of race, class, culture, and sexuality will be examined as well as legal, medical and sociological responses. Readings will cover current statistical data, research, and theory as well as information on the history of the battered women's movement, the rape crisis center movement, violent repression of women's political expressions internationally, and the effect of violence on immigrant and indigenous women in the U.S. and abroad. STUDENTS MUST ENROLL IN A DISCUSSION SECTION FOR THE COURSE. STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN L77 393 VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN: CURRENT ISSUES AND RESPONSES CAN NOT TAKE THIS CLASS. 3 units. Same as home course L77 WGSS 393.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 391

Register via WebStac

L77-3942 section 01: Service Learning: Projects in Domestic Violence

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Ake

Description

In this course, we will explore the links between the theories and practices of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies through a combination of research and direct community engagement.  Course readings will focus on the ways that poverty and violence, along with race and gender expectations, shape the lives of women.  A required community service project for this course asks students to examine the relationship between the course readings and the lives of actual women in St. Louis.  Over the course of the semester, students will design and execute programming for women at a local community agency.  This is a writing intensive course.  IMPORTANT NOTE: this service-learning class means it combines classroom learning with outside work at a community organization. In addition to regular class time, there is a service requirement, which will necessitate an additional 4-5 hours a week. Moreover, there is a required all-day service training on a Saturday for this course. If you cannot commit to these out-of-class obligations, which are required to pass the course, do not register for the class. Prereq: Intro to Women and Gender Studies or Intro to Sexuality Studies and  Violence Against Women: Current Issues and Responses (L77 393) or by permission of instructor.  

Credit Hours

4

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK
MD

Same As

Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies L77 3942

Register via WebStac

L98-4001: Directed Study in American Culture Studies

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Murphy

Description

By permission of instructor. Credit variable, max 3 units.
SECT 01: Uncle Joe's Peer Counseling Training Workshop:This course awards credit to 6 current Joe's counselors (1 Training Director and 5 Trainers) involved in the training process of the 2016 Uncle Joe's recruits. Uncle Joe's Training includes, but is not limited to: student life and grief, family, diversity, substance abuse and dependence, mental illness, sexual health and IPV (Inter-partner Violence), eating disorders, sexual assault and rape, suicide and self-injury. The trainers are intended to guide the trainees through these topics, while also serving as a unique experience of a focused exploration of topics/issues/questions that emerge as particularly important to each trainer. Regular documentation (field notes or journal entries) will give trainers the ability to refer back to their thoughts and personal growth when considering a final reflective project (in any form they see most appropriate with consultation from the supervisor). The guidance from a faculty supervisor will inform each trainer's targeted topic and provide trainers with instruction and suggestions as they see fit, so that the final project can be useful in contexts beyond the training process. The trainers can focus on any topic they see as significant to them, and may choose to consult with the training director if they so wish.Training will take place between January 26th and April 12th, and will occur biweekly on Tuesday nights from 7pm to 10pm and Saturdays from 10am to 6pm. Trainers will meet biweekly on Sunday nights from 6pm to 8pm and Thursday nights from 6pm to 8pm to prepare for the following training session. The mandatory trainer's retreat is Tuesday, January 19th from 6pm to 8pm and the following biweekly trainer's meetings begins on Sunday, January 24th and ends on Sunday, April 10th. These commitments, in addition to the actual training, will result in ~130 hours of commitment.

Credit Hours

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-400B: AMCS Capstone Workshop II

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Cohan

Description

This course is required for students planning to complete the Latin Honors thesis or a 6-credit non-honors project through American Culture Studies. It builds on work done in L98 400A: AMCS Capstone Workshop I, and involves periodic workshops and conferences with the instructor and project advisor(s) during the final stages of thesis preparation. Alternatively, students seeking to earn an additional 1-2 credits for their one-semester capstone will enroll in this course after their petition to expand their capstone has been approved and expectations have been defined in consultation with the capstone advisor and workshop instructor. Prereq: Satisfactory standing as a candidate for a two-semester capstone, including successful completion of L98 400A: Capstone Workshop I and permission of project advisor. Latin Honors eligible students must meet the University GPA minimum. Credit variable, max. 3 units. Course will meet every other week, time/date to be determined based on participants' schedules. Credit variable, max 3 units.

Credit Hours

Weekly Schedule

W 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-4036: Children of Immigrants: Identity and Acculturation

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Gao-Miles

Description

This seminar takes an interdisciplinary approach to children of immigrants as an analytical subject. Our investigation looks into the 1.5- and second-generation youth of different cultural and ethnic backgrounds in the United States (with many case studies focusing on Asian Americans and Latinx). Discussion topics include migration and identity, ethnicity and race, bilingualism and biculturalism, family and school, youth culture, and other pressing issues such as mental health. The seminar offers a theoretical lens into children of immigrants by introducing different research methodologies in social sciences. The students are required to conduct an individual research project among a selected group of children of immigrants. 3 units. Same as home course L97 IAS 4036.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 4036

Register via WebStac

L98-4060 section 01: Sexual Health and the City: A Community-Based Learning Course

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Parikh

Description

In this community-based learning course students will partner with a St. Louis AIDS service organization (ASO) or sexual health agency to explore how the interrelationships among gender, class, race/ethnicity, and sexual identity shape sexual health decisions, outcomes, and access to services. Students will also examine the complex relationship between men's and women's life goals and constraints, on the one hand, and the public health management of sexual health, on the other. In collaboration with their community partner and its clients, students will develop a project that addresses an identified need of the organization and the community it serves. Course readings will draw from the fields of anthropology, public health, feminist studies, and policy-making. Prereq: Students will be placed on the waitlist and will complete a bio form indicating their related past experience or coursework, and their commitment to partnering with a community agency. 3 units. Same as home course L90 AFAS 406.

SECT 01: Prerequisite: Students will be placed on the waitlist and will complete a bio form indicating their related past experience or coursework, and their commitment to partnering with a community agency.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

W 2:00-5:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK
MD

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 4060

Register via WebStac

U89-414 section 01: From Redlining to Avocado Toast: Race, Class, and Real Estate

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Michael Allen

Description

Much contemporary discourse around urban studies concerns both the growing awareness that  American cities relied on racial segregation in their development, and the recognition that gentrification is changing who gets to inhabit certain areas. In both established and revitalizing cities, race and class seem to determine how much of our paychecks go to rent and whether the coffee shop on the corner sells avocado toast. This course examines the ways in which historic segregation practices - red-lining, restrictive covenants, zoning laws and suburban enclave creation - intersect with contemporary gentrification aspects - being "priced out" or displaced, changing faces of neighborhoods from low-income residents to more affluent "hipsters" and professionals, and the success of places like Brooklyn alongside continued decline of places like Flint. The relationship between segregation practices and gentrification aspects will be addressed through historic and contemporary accounts ranging across scholarship, journalism, fiction, film and music. Historic research on St. Louis will support a broad inquiry across American cities near and far, to unpack why the US continues to struggle making cities that truly belong to everyone.

This course fulfills the Humanities distribution requirement for the AMCS MA program. The course may also count towards the Undergraduate Major or Minor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T--- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac

L98-4203: Civic Scholars Program Semester Four: Civic Engagement across the Lifespan

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Kouo

Patel

Description

This is the fourth semester course for students in the Civic Scholars Program of the Gephardt Institute for Public Service. This culminating course provides students with the opportunity to integrate the Civic Scholars experience, explore civic engagement opportunites post-college, and discuss ethics and civic engagement. Through group discussions, readings, lectures, and guest speakers, students 1) understand civic engagement over the life course; 2) discuss ethics and civic engagement; and 3) develop a one-, five-, ten-, and twenty-year civic vision. This one-credit course will meet weekly for one hour during the spring semester. Students are expected to take an active role in their learning through sharing their experiences, engaging with reading material, and participating in reflection exercises. Prereq: L98 3202, L98 3203 and L98 4202. Civic Scholars courses do not count towards the AMCS Major and Minor. 1 unit.

Credit Hours

1

Weekly Schedule

Tu 2:00-5:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-423: Topics in American Literature: Imagining Multi-Racial Coalitions

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Le-Khac

Description

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 423

Register via WebStac

L98-4231: Topics in American Literature I

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Pollak

Description

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 4231

Register via WebStac

U89 -4262 section 01: Art Writing and Anthropological Storytelling

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Benson

Description

This course explores the field of art writing as it relates to cultural anthropology.  Anthropologists studying diverse cultures, subjective experience, and profound societal transformations are increasingly using experimental writing techniques from journalism, memoir, creative non-fiction, critical-fiction, site-writing, poetry, and queer studies.  We engage anthropological writing styles that emphasize new aesthetical and literary means of describing the richness, the deep emotional tone, and also the dangers of human experience.  We read works that look at ordinary life and everydayness, how we perceive the world around us, the feeling of being at home and senses of place, how we experience pain, what makes our bodies powerful or vulnerable, why things really matter, and how communities cope with trauma, violence, mental illness, addiction, and life during wartime.

Upon completion of this course, students will have obtained a comprehensive understanding of contemporary experimental genres in creative writing as they intersect with humanistic endeavors in cultural anthropology. This develops practical tools that can be used in self-reflection and social analysis, and strategies for writing and reading works of culture with an eye toward the richness of the possibilities and predicaments that define human conditions.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W-- 5:00-7:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Same As

Anthropology U89 4262

Register via WebStac

L98-433D: Performing Gender and Sexuality in America

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Das

Description

This course examines how the performance of gender and sexuality has shaped the social, cultural, and political history of the United States from the early nineteenth century to the present. While performance happens in everyday life, we will primarily focus on how the stage has been a potent space to debate issues about gender and sexuality. This course will put forth the argument that the stage has historically not only reflected broader social concerns, but also actively helped to shape those social dynamics. After an introduction to foundational ideas, we will start the semester with minstrelsy, signaling that the performance of gender and sexuality in America is deeply intertwined with race, class, and national belonging. Reading and viewing assignments bring together feminist theory, queer theory, American social history, and performance texts to build robust seminar discussions. 3 units. Same as home course L29 Dance 433.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 433D

Register via WebStac

L98-4456: Ethnographic Fieldwork: Energy Politics

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Gustafson

Description

This is a practice-based course in ethnographic fieldwork that will focus on the politics of fossil fuels and the renewable energy transition in St. Louis and Missouri. We will situate ourselves as anthropologists with an interest in understanding relationships between global warming, the socio-technical arrangements of energy production, circulation, and use in the city and region, public knowledge, health, and social and cultural practices, and the roles and activities of businesses, political institutions, and elected officials. Through case studies we will work to produce critical knowledge aimed at pushing institutions, the city, and the region toward the transition to renewable energy. Our efforts will produce empirical documentation, case studies, and proposals and may include field trips to resource extraction sites and government offices 3 units. Same as home course L48 Anthro 4456.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 4456

Register via WebStac

L98-448W: Current Macroeconomic Issues

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Fazzari

Description

Review and extension of macroeconomic models from Econ 4021 from a comparative perspective and use of these models to analyze current macroeconomic and policy issues. Topics include recession and recovery, long-term growth, saving and social security, investment, and monetary policy. Multiple writing assignments that emphasize critical analysis of theoretical perspectives and readings applied to current macroeconomic topics. Writing will be revised to improve logical structure, clarity, and style. Enrollment limited to 15 students with priority given to senior economics majors. Prereq: Econ 4021. PLEASE NOTE: Requests for on-line registration will be wait listed. You will receive an email confirming your registration in the course from the instructor. 3 units. Same as home course L11 Econ 448W.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 9:30-11:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 448W

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U89-454 section 01: Ethics and Ethnography

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Willow Mullins

Description

This course sets out to explore the ethical questions raised during ethnographic research. Ethnographic research requires the student of culture to form deep relationships with the people whose culture they hope to study. How are the goals of the ethnographer in balance with the needs of those they study? How can histories of oppression affect the ethnographic relationship? Following Ella Shohat, we will ask, "who is mobilizing what in the articulation of the past, deploying what identities, identifications and representations, and in the name of what political vision and goals?" Ethnographies will form our primary texts for the course, supplemented with ethnographical theory. While we take a theoretical approach to the subject, students are encouraged to think in terms of their own work and projects, with the ultimate goal of producing an ethics statement of their own.

This course fulfills the Humanities or Social Science distribution requirements for the AMCS MA program. The course may also count towards the Undergraduate Major or Minor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M---- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

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L98-4562: Artifact Analysis: Mississippian Cultures

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Kelly

Description

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introductory, hands-on experience of the methods employed in the analysis of archaeological materials common to the Mississippian culture. Students will conduct class projects based on collections from Cahokia Mounds and the St. Louis region. Prereq: Anthro 314 or equivalent, or graduate standing, or permission of instructor. 3 units. Same as home course L48 Anthro 4562.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Early America

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 4562

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L98-4564: American Pragmatism

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Knapp

Description

This course examines the history of American pragmatism through three of its primary founders, the philosophers Charles Peirce, William James, and John Dewey. It considers pragmatism as a response to the experience of uncertainty brought on my modernity, and contextualizes it amidst late nineteenth and early twentieth century thought and politics, namely, scientific methodology, evolutionary theory, the probabilistic revolution, Transcendentalism, the rise of secularism, slavery, Abolitionism, and the Civil War. Major essays by each thinker will be read as well as three intellectual biographies and one critical survey. PREREQ: Prior coursework in history or permission of the instructor. Modern, U.S. 3 units. Same as home course L22 History 4564.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TuTh 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

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L98-457: American Film Genres

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Paul

Description

By close examination of three or four specific types of film narratives, this course will explore how genre has functioned in the Hollywood mode of production. Students will gain an understanding of genre both as a critical construct as well as a form created by practical economic concerns, a means of creating extratextual communication between film artist/producers and audience/consumers. Genres for study will be chosen from the western, the gangster film, the horror movie, the musical, screwball comedy, science fiction, the family melodrama, the woman's film, and others. In addition to film showings, there will be readings in genre theory as well as genre analyses of individual films. Required screenings Tuesdays @ 4pm 3 units. Same as home course L53 Film 450.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MW 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 457

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L98-4607: Topics in African American Studies: Historical Racial Violence: Legacies & Reckonings

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Ward

Description

There is growing awareness of the legacies of historical racial violence in the United States and a related increase in reckoning efforts. Area histories of enslavement, lynching, and other racial terror and dispossession relate to inequality, conflict, and violence in the same places today. These 'haunting legacies' include heart disease and other health disparity, homicide rates, white supremacist mobilization, and corporal punishment in schools. Meanwhile, many communities and institutions are moving to acknowledge and address legacies of historical racial violence in various ways. This course combines seminar-style readings and writing on legacies of racial violence with a practicum component, where individual students or groups of students will conceptualize and develop interventions intended to clarify and disrupt legacies of racial violence, facilitating contemporary reckoning. The practicum will explore and support a broad range of interventive efforts, including public policy measures, original research projects, archival development, commemorative efforts, and a related array of mediums, including visual art, design, film, digital projects, and other creative approaches. 3 units. Same as home course L90 AFAS 4601.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

Tu 3:00-6:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

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L98-461B: Construction and Experience of Black Adolescence

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Barnes

Duncan

Description

This course examines the construct of black adolescence from the general perspectives of anthropology, sociology, and psychology. It begins by studying the construct of black adolescence as an "invention" of the social and behavioral sciences. The course then draws upon narrative data, autobiography, literature and multimedia sources authored by black youth to recast black adolescence as a complex social, psychological, cultural and political phenomenon. This course focuses on the meaning-making experiences of urban-dwelling black adolescents and highlights these relations within the contexts of class, gender, sexuality, and education. 3 units. Same as home course L90 AFAS 461B.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

W 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 461B

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U89-474 section 01: Studies in American Cultural Identity: The Civil War to the Jazz Age

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Allen Schwab

Description

The course is an exploration of later 19th-early 20th Century American literary, visual, and musical art in relation to key themes, decisive moments, and cultural developments which have shaped and defined our national character.  Struggles for religious, racial, and gender rights; American violence; our polarities of innocence and experience, of individual and group welfare, individualism and conformity; and complex expressions of The American Dream and its dreamers, all receive attention.  We view American Post-Romantic, Realistic, Naturalistic, and Post-World War I visual art, architecture, and photography; listen to late 19th Century, turn of the Century, and Jazz age music; and read from major and less well known literary figures to consider how the social and political developments of the time influenced our artists as the flourishing of a distinctly American art became an internationally acknowledged fact.

The course counts toward the American Culture Studies Major and Minor for day students, and  fulfills the Humanities or Arts distribution requirement for the AMCS M.A. program.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W-- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

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L98-4744: TransAmerica: The US and Mexico between the Wars

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Miller

Description

Many areas of 20th century US culture between World Wars I and II were inspired by post-revolutionary Mexico. The Mexican Revolution (1910-1917) profoundly reoriented modern Mexico, introducing new cultural and aesthetic forms and historical themes over subsequent decades. Mexican artists contributed to a new national consciousness drawing on indigenous Mexico and on the new politics of workers and peasants, given monumental expression in mural painting. The bidirectional exchange between US and Mexican artists was of great importance for the cultural revitalization of the New Deal and after in the US. Among artists, writers, anthropologists, and tourists, the vogue for things Mexican was fed by many sources, including increasing travel, diplomatic exchange, and a yearning for alternatives to US modernity. The seminar will support travel to Mexico City, funded by the Art History and Archaeology Department. Must be a graduate student, or an undergraduate major or minor in Art History and Archaeology. Recommended courses: one 300- or 400-level course in 20th c. US art or history; or one relevant course in Latin American Studies program. 3 units. Same as home course L01 Art-Arch 4744.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

W 6:00-9:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
A Sense of Place
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 4744

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L98-480: Education and Public Policy in the United States

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Odis Johnson

Description

This course takes a triangulated approach to the field of public policy as it relates to education and social problems. First, the course emphasizes theories of public policy that frame the field of policy studies. Major questions extending from this course feature include: What is public policy, policy behavior, its defining processes/features and what social function does it serve? Second, the course emphasizes the skills related to the exercise of policy analysis. These skills include the crafting of technical documents within the field of public policy (e.g. a policy brief) and the application of scientific methods to the exploration of social problems/governmental actions. Likely issues related to this course feature include the use of scientific knowledge in political arenas, engagement with stakeholders and the intended/unintended consequences of policy science to political decision-making. Third, this course simulates the policymaking context through students' participation in mock congressional testimonies. These focal areas will become central to an understanding of four social concerns: school desegregation following the Brown decisions; affirmative action in higher education; Head Start programs and/or the ESEA Act of 1965, also known as No Child Left Behind. Educational opportunity, achievement inequality and social change will be the primary interests that link these course features. 3 units. Same as home course L12 Educ 489.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

W 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

AMERICAN CULTURE STUDIES L98 480

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L98-490B: AMCS Senior Workshop: Connections and Explorations

Semester

SP2019

Section

Instructor

Murphy

Description

Where have your studies in American Culture taken you? In this one-credit workshop AMCS Majors work with mentors and peers to curate their AMCS Portfolio, reflect on their journey through the major, and prepare for the public presentation of their capstone research. The course gives AMCS Majors space and time to think more deeply about what they have achieved academically and where their intellectual and personal priorities intersect. We hope it helps AMCS students to discover connections among what they have done and learned in the program and clarifies post-college goals and pursuits. Some of the workshop activities are required for the major (e.g., the capstone presentation). The course provides structure, support, and academic credit for doing them. The Senior Spring Workshop is part of a new workshop series designed to help AMCS Majors develop a student portfolio and provide additional training and support at particular milestones in the program. The portfolio and workshops are a response to students' feedback: Graduating seniors tell us they would have liked more structured time to reflect on their work in the major; they would have liked to document their progress and growth in the program more fully; and they wanted more opportunities to strengthen their class cohort. The Senior Workshop will foster all of these things, while centering students' attention on the connections among their academic, personal, and career interests. 1 unit.

Credit Hours

1

Weekly Schedule

M 4:00-5:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

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L98-4930 section 01: In|Visible St. Louis: People, Place, and Power in the Divided City

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Collins and Cunningham

Description

This course approaches the study of segregation and inequality in St. Louis as deeply relational and contextual-that is, embedded in a particular space and place, and constituted through social-political relations. Students will be immersed in the history, theory and contemporary academic debates surrounding inequality, segregation, and social justice initiatives in urban cities across the U.S. The course pairs this theoretical base (conceiving of segregation as multifaceted and durable, historical, spatial, and interpersonal) with intensive research experiences drawing on the methodological tools available across sociology, urban design, and architecture (archival research, data collection, mapping, diagramming, interviewing, field observation). Students will initiate collaborative research projects aligning with the needs of local organizations that serve the city's historically disadvantaged populations. Local guest speakers (scholars, community leaders, residents) will enhance students' classroom learning, as will site visits and other discussion formats. This interdisciplinary course bridges the Department of Sociology and the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, a collaboration supported by The Divided City initiative.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T--- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK
MD

Same As

American Culture Studies L98 4930

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A46-530A section 01: Special Topics: Borders, Boundaries, Nations: Spaces of the Democratic Subject

Semester

SP2019

Section

01

Instructor

Michael Allen

Description

Lines on the land can determine our political rights, our ethnic identities and our inhabitation abilities. Landscapes become the records of the powers of statecraft, the instruments of territorial division, the customs of inhabitants, the contests of politics and the symbols of society. This course examines the development of landscape as the record of the political subject against the nation state - the ways in which ordinary inhabitation of land entangles each of us with large political structures. This entanglement is productive - cultural agency can change, topple or expand nations. The course will track borders and boundaries from the "Delmar Divide" to the Iron Curtain to the US/Mexican border. Students will review interpretive practices including cultural geography, historic preservation, political economy, critical landscape study and artistic production. Field outings will draw out the power structures that create, sustain, erase and alter landscapes with national identities. Student work will include response writing, visual analysis and a final project illustrating the state power play occurring in what could look like a very ordinary landscape.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

----F 8:30-11:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK
MD

Same As

Architecture A46 530A

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