course listings, SP2018

Undergraduate Courses

Every semester, AMCS posts our home-based and cross-listed courses on a custom webpage where students can sort courses by level, concentration, designation, and instructor. These are the same courses as listed in WebStac, but with information specific to the major and minor, like concentration area and requirement. Select from the nav bar below to review the list for the upcoming semester.

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  • SP2018

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L98-105 section 01: History of Jazz

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Richard Deja

Description

History of jazz to the present, including its African elements.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L27 105

Register via WebStac

L98-118A section 01: Geology of National Parks

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Robert Dymek

Description

Survey of geologic processes occurring at the Earth's surface and its interior using national parks and monuments as the prime venue for presentation. Volcanism and mountain-building; the work of streams, glaciers, and wind; lake and coastline development; stratigraphy and sedimentation; and Earth history. Material presented in a geographic context, with emphasis on landforms and landscape evolution, relating geology to the development and settlement of the U.S.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place

Program Attributes

Same As

L19 118A

Register via WebStac

L98-130 section 01: Fresh Sem: The Ritual Landscape of Cahokia: Perspectives on the Politics of Religion & Chiefly Power

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

John Kelly

Description

The purpose of this class is to engage and challenge freshman students in an open discussion about the prehistoric Mississippian community of Cahokia. The focus of this course is two-fold. The first is to study the way in which the archaeological evidence has been interpreted. The second is to examine other perspectives on Cahokia, especially from the Native American descendants who consecrated this landscape nearly a millennium ago. An underlying tenet of this seminar in understanding Cahokia can also be achieved through the traditions and literature of Native Americans. In the end we want to understand the basis for Cahokia's organization as a prehistoric Native American community, and the role that ritual and religion played in the rather dramatic and dynamic history of this community and the surrounding region.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L48 130

Register via WebStac

L98-135 section 01: Freshman Seminar - Chinatown: Migration, Identity, and Space

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

LinLing Gao-Miles

Description

Chinatown, as a cultural symbol and a spatial entity, links various topics and studies in this course. Our survey starts with a historical and geographical glimpse of five Chinatowns in the US through the real life stories of their residents. This is followed by an in-depth study of Chinese restaurants and food all over the world using texts, images, and films that reveal how Chinese cuisine is inherited in and adapted to each local culture and society. The seminar culminates in a discussion of Chinese migration and settlement, the representations of identity, and the cultural and spatial constructions in particular historical and social contexts. The assignments include fieldtrips to Chinese businesses, and a debate on whether or not Olive Boulevard constitutes a Chinatown in St Louis.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L97 135

Register via WebStac

L98-145 section 01: First Year Seminar: Frankenstein: Man, Myth, Monster

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Schvey

Description

In the year in which Washington University commemorates the 200th Anniversary of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, this Freshman Seminar investigates the phenomenon of the novel's remarkable and varied after-life-in fiction, theatre, film, and popular culture. From its appearance in 1818, the story of Frankenstein touched the imagination, raising powerful questions about who we are. What did the novel say to the English society in which it first appeared? What does it tell us about 21st Century America? Is it a story about the dangers of science loosed from its moorings? Is this "Modern Prometheus" (the novel's subtitle) a tale of Man's presumption in assuming the mantle of the divine? Is it a story of the corruption of child-like innocence? Or is it a modern parable of the Outsider-centering on the (nameless) creature's strange physiognomy, and his essential "Otherness"? A story which somehow connects a 19th Century English novel with the development of the classic horror film, Civil Rights activist Dick Gregory, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Andy Warhol, and Mel Brooks (Young Frankenstein), along with countless toys, comic books and video games still has much to offer us today. The seminar combines critical analysis with historical research, incorporating readings from a number of disciplines. In addition to a culminating research paper, students will be asked to create and develop an original performance piece based on the legend of Frankenstein.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

Drama L15 145

Register via WebStac

L98-2033 section 01: Introduction to Education: Contradictions and Controversies in School Choice

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Ebony Duncan

Description

This course is a broad look at the diverse issues surrounding education not only in the U.S. but around the world. Students will examine schooling in areas such as the Pacific Rim, Middle East, Europe, and America. We will also take a look at educating when working with children with special needs. In addition, students will explore some of the ideas and issues unique to the experience of teaching and learning in the U.S. Students will work in small groups throughout the semester in projects designed to deepen their understanding of Education in the 21st Century. Throughout the semester, students will participate in the Each One Teach One program as tutors. (This course is recommended for Freshmen and Sophmores only)

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L12 203A

Register via WebStac

L98-206 section 01: Reading Culture: How to Read Images: Visual Culture and Visual Literacy

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Peter Coogan

Description

We live in a visual culture, which is also a culture of appropriation. In a single day, you might watch Superman v. Batman; play Arkham City on Playstation; watch the Badman parody by Pete Holmes; send a meme with Batman slapping Robin; take pictures of a Batfamily group cosplay at a comicon; read a Prezi Batman visual essay; or on Halloween give Batman candy to a Batkid. These representations (or, images) of Batman illustrate appropriation at play in our multilayered visual culture-any of them could be reiterated, interrogated, or discussed further in the cultural production of the visual and most of them are not official or controlled by DC Comics, the owner of Batman. Viewing and understanding these images of Batman-or any other iconic figure of American popular or political culture-requires visual literacy. We encounter and interact with the most immersive, compelling, and culturally relevant texts-whether stories, memes, concepts, characters, personalities-through visual means and visualizing is central to cultural production and consumption today; therefore, visual literacy is a necessary part of cultural education and understanding. This course takes a visual literacy approach-learning how to read different kinds of visual texts across a series of axes (static/moving, isolated/contextual, displayed/encountered, original/copied/transformed)-while placing those media within a larger context of cultural analysis as part of American Culture Studies and across a range of disciplines-cinema studies, literary analysis, art history and criticism -to learn how meaning is constructed visually. For some assignments students will produce visual texts as part of demonstrating their understanding of visual culture and literacy.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

INTRO
INTRO
MD
MD

Register via WebStac

L98-209B section 01: Scriptures and Cultural Traditions

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Lance Jenott

Description

When we think of the word 'scripture' in antiquity, we might think of the texts that have been compiled in the different holy books that we currently have today. Yet the function of 'scriptures' within a community, and the status given to different texts treated as 'scriptural,' has changed in different times and places. In this course, we will consider texts that would eventually come to be part of the Hebrew Bible, New Testament, and the Qu'ran as well as several of the exegetes and reading communities that shaped their various interpretations. We will explore how non-canonical sources played a role in the formation of the various canons we have today, comparing the authoritative status given to these texts to that given to other works from antiquity, such as the epics of Homer. Special attention will be played to the role of the receiving community in the development of 'scripture,' and the variety of the contexts in which scripture can function in the construction of and opposition to religious authority.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L93 209

Register via WebStac

L98-226 section 01: Sociological Approaches to American Health Care

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Linda Lindsey

Description

Exploration through the sociological lens of how health, illness, and health care delivery in the United States are influenced by the social structure in which they are embedded. With the backdrop of the ongoing crisis of health care in the United States and the controversy surrounding the Affordable Care Act, we focus on the intersection of diversity factors including such as race, social class, gender, sexuality that predict risks in navigating the health care system. Professionals representing a variety of health oriented settings and serving the needs of a diverse constituency will share their perspectives. No prerequisites.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Same As

L40 2510

Register via WebStac

L98-229 section 01: Introduction to American Culture Studies: Sport in the University

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Noah Cohan

Description

Organized athletics are an influential part of American culture, and have been for more than 130 years. In many ways, the rise of sporting cultures in the United States reflected a similar process of modernizing and commercializing physical contests that took place around the world. In one significant way it did not: American athletics were built into, and made inextricable from, the foundations of the nation's university system. As such, these high profile games were constructed upon the ideals of "amateurism," a term with significant ramifications for the ostensible objectives of the athletes playing college sports and the administrators organizing them. Since the early 20th century, these ideals have been largely overseen by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (or NCAA), an organization that has also transformed the games of its member institutions into a multibillion dollar industry. This has resulted in soaring profits for participating universities and, critics have argued, an attendant abdication on the part of many universities of their responsibility to provide all of their students (athletes and otherwise) with meaningful educational experiences.

This course traces the history and culture of sports in the American university from the 1880s to the present, and asks: What are the benefits of big time sports on campus? What are the drawbacks? What are the ramifications for American culture, broadly construed? What are the consequences for our educational institutions and the culture of higher learning? How does the continued prominence and influence of the NCAA affect the way we understand what sports are, and can be? How are students and athletes themselves affected, for good or ill? How are matters of gender, race, and sexuality affected by sporting cultures on campus? What future might we imagine for sport in the university?

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

INTRO

Register via WebStac

L98-230 section 01: Topics in Urban America: The Sensory Landscape of the American City

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Taylor Desloge

Description

This course foregrounds the interpretive and analytical approaches used in the study of American cities. The city is a crucial frame for understanding the nation's cultural, economic, social, political and ecological concerns and evolution. Employing multiple perspectives, we interpret urban space as a product of culture, explore the city's importance in shaping American society, and investigate the ongoing evolution of the built environment. This course lays the basis for interdisciplinary thinking and research in American culture studies. The topic varies by semester. Please see Course Listings for a description of the current offering. The course is ideal for AMCS majors and minors, but others are welcome. This course fulfills the introductory course requirement for AMCS students.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

INTRO

Register via WebStac

L98-232 section 01: Workshop in Media Culture: Narrative and Historical Storytelling

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Brian Woodman

Description

Whether Hollywood representations of Civil War politics in Lincoln, documentary reconstruction of the civil rights movement in Eyes on the Prize, or modern day news coverage of the Ferguson protests through Internet and social media, our understanding of history and culture are always mediated by the presence of storytelling techniques. This exploration-based workshop considers how media makers reconstruct historical people, places, and events using different media-based storytelling techniques. Through criticism and analysis of various media artifacts (e.g., documentary and narrative film, podcasts, and online/gallery exhibits), we seek to understand issues like the effects of manipulating historical facts to enhance a story, the ethics of portraying a person's life on screen, and the challenges of representing contesting voices within a narrative framework. We consider the broader political, social, and cultural ramifications wrought when media makers, intentionally or not, misrepresent people, movements, issues, ideas, and events. Students visit local historical archives such as the W.U. Film & Media Archive to examine primary source materials and to learn how they are utilized in the narrative construction of media projects. In addition they are trained in basic archival research, interview, and oral history techniques. Throughout the semester, students actively create media projects that synthesize their class learning into a final short film, documentary, podcast, exhibit, or other form that engages in, or actively critiques, historical narrative construction. Final projects will be created with regular consultation of the instructor. **Note: Technology and equipment needed for a particular final project may not be available through the course. It is best for students to be able to provide their own equipment for their project of choice, such as basic editing software (Moviemaker or iMovie), camera (consumer grade or even cell phone cameras will suffice), or whatever else a project might need. Media production knowledge is not a prerequisite for taking this course.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-237 section 01: Don't Believe the Hype: Race, Media, and Social Movements in America

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Vernon Mitchell

Description

Don't Believe the Hype will provide students with the tools to critique popular media and its association to social movements in America. This course will explore and analyze how media, broadly defined, including (but not limited to) music, art, film, literature, television and social media, has influenced social movements in very profound ways over the last century. The course will centralize the African American experience and the Black Freedom Movement in particular and will teach students how to contextualize media and critically assess its impact, and examine the various ways media has played pivotal roles in social movement. Using these skills we will answer the following questions: What is the audience for a particular form of media? When does a social movement become part of popular culture? What is the purpose of media in these situations? How effective has media been for organizing? An integral part to this course will be the use of the Henry Hampton Archive in the Washington University Film & Media Archive. The archive is a repository of primary materials that will be utilized throughout the semester. By using the Hampton Collection students will also learn to analyze and interpret primary documents while also having a more nuanced understanding of history and how media is constructed and informs the way we process socio-political currents that evolve into social movements. Attendance Mandatory during first 2 weeks.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Register via WebStac

L98-245 section 01: Images of Disability in Film and Literature

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Kathleen Kniepmann

Description

This course will critically examine the portrayal of persons with disabilities in literature and film, exploring how those images either shape or mimic general public impressions. We will discuss the implications of messages from the media on American responses to people with disabilities, as well as formulating strategies for promoting positive, inclusive messages. Perspectives from social science, health care, communications and other fields will provide frameworks for analysis. Literature will include fiction, biography and autobiography in books, essays, drama, poetry and short stories. Selections from fictional, educational, and documentary films will be reviewed during the semester. We will also investigate images in newspapers, magazines and advertising.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Same As

L43 249

Register via WebStac

L98-250 section 01: Topics in Asian American Studies:Asian & Pacific Island America: Identity, Diversity & Social Change

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Linda Lindsey

Description

An introductory survey covering United States immigrant populations from throughout Eastern and Southern Asia

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac

L98-255 section 01: Religion, Environmentalism, and Politics

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Kornfeld

Description

This course explores the intersections of anthropology, theology, economic interests, and activism. We will draw on a range of sources including social-scientific theories about religion and ritual, discussions of disenchantment and re-enchantment, and indigenous claims to land. These theoretical frameworks will provide context for discussing contemporary religious responses to ecological disaster, including both environmentalist and anti-environmentalist movements.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

Religion & Politics L98 255

Register via WebStac

L98-256 section 01: Imagining Interdisciplinary: The Interdisciplinary Workshop in American Culture Studies

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Mire Murphy

Description

Why study American culture? In this workshop we explore some of the many answers to this provocative question, as well as some of the objects of study available to us as students of American culture. Intended as a foundation for the American Culture Studies (AMCS) major and minor, the course is practical, exploratory and discussion-oriented. It helps students to get acquainted with AMCS as a community while imagining the types of projects that get done there. Sessions feature guest speakers, field trips to sites of cultural interest, and short readings that introduce different approaches to American culture studies. Students also examine the methods and questions that define their other field(s), and identify topics and fieldwork projects that especially engage them. Along the way, they are mentored by one of the program's Undergraduate Scholars, and helped to locate themselves in an inter-departmental program that supports a wide range of intellectual pursuits. The final assignment is a contribution to the 'anthology project,' a student-generated compilation of resources and readings that will be shared with future AMCS students.

Credit Hours

1

Weekly Schedule

M------ 11:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-261 section 01: The Cultural Lives of Things: An Introduction to American Material Culture

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Heidi Kolk

Description

American culture is so often defined by its obsessive attachment to material things - the iPhones, coffee cups, favorite t-shirts and Harley-Davidson motorcycles that fill our everyday lives. This course will explore our contradictory relationship to such objects - the possessions that serve practical functions and give us a sense of identity, meaning and power, but just as often come to possess or control us. How do things take hold of us? What gives them potency, value, and cultural significance? What psychological, social, economic and political purposes do they serve? Do Americans have a distinct relationship (or a dysfunctional attachment) to their possessions? In answering such questions, we will consider objects of all kinds, from the mundane and utilitarian to the strange, rare and often-fetishized. We will explore their histories, their participation in regimes of commodification and power, their everyday and symbolic functions - in short, the twists and turns of their rich cultural lives. The course will introduce different strategies for interpreting objects as cultural evidence, drawing upon work in anthropology, art history, sociology, literature and museum studies, as well as theorists (Marx, Freud, Baudrillard, and others) who have influenced modern conceptions of material life. Students should also look forward to some in-the-field analysis of different historic, museum, and personal objects around St. Louis (field trips!).

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Register via WebStac

L98-2910 section 01: Alternative Facts: An Introduction to the Social Construction of Reality

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Schachter

Description

Introduction to the concept of social construction-the idea that our 'objective' reality is shaped by our social positions and through social interactions. Recent political events and social conflicts highlight deep divisions in American society, raising critical questions about the media and objectivity (e.g., alternative facts and 'fake' news), networks and segregation (e.g., who talks to whom), who gets to decide what is viewed as `truth,' and the role of researchers and academia in combating (or contributing to) misinformation. This course explores these questions with a sociological lens. We will use foundational sociological theories to learn how to recognize the existence of multiple realities, and consider the implications of social constructionism for key domains of everyday life, American politics, and the production of knowledge. We will also discuss the ways that cutting-edge technological innovations and academic research can-or cannot-help us distinguish facts from 'alternative' facts. Introductory level, no prerequisites.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

Sociology L98 2910

Register via WebStac

L98-300B section 01: Feminist Fire!: Radical Black Women in the 20th Century

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Jonathan Fenderson

Description

Black women have been at the forefront of the Black radical tradition since its inception. Often marginalized in both the scholarship and popular memory, there exist a long unbroken chain of women who have organized around the principles of anti-sexism, anti-racism, and anti-capitalism. Frequently critical of heterosexist projects as well, these women have been the primary force driving the segment of the Black radical tradition that is commonly referred to as Black Feminism. Remaining cognizant of the fact that Black Feminist thought has also flourished as an academic enterprise-complete with its own theoretical interventions (ie. standpoint theory, intersectionality, dissemblance, etc.) and competing scholarly agendas-this course will think through the project of Black Feminism as a social movement driven by activism and vigorous political action for social change. Focusing on grassroots efforts at organizing, movement building, consciousness raising, policy reform, and political mobilization, Feminist Fire will center Black Feminists who explicitly embraced a critical posture towards capitalism as an untenable social order. We will prioritize the life and thought of 20th century women like Claudia Jones, Queen Mother Audley Moore, Frances Beal, Barbara Smith, Audre Lorde, Angela Davis and organizations like the Combahee River Collective, Chicago's Black Women's Committee, and the Third World Women's Alliance. At its core, the course aims to bring the social movement history back into the discourse around Black Feminism.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L90 3002

Register via WebStac

L98-301B section 01: Individual and Community

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Alfred Darnell

Description

What social, political, and cultural forces shape the individuality of people and yet make them part of not just one community but many, each of which is greater than the sum of the individuals that comprise it? What role do families and friends fill in this process? We explore answers to these questions by reading theories and case studies that try to explain the foundations of individuals' sense of self and the interdependence and responsibilities of individuals, families, and communities to one another. Cases we read highlight (1) how family and communal experiences (like school) influence individuals and (2) how virtual (online) and non-virtual communities are structured and sustained as social entities. In addition to readings, the class will rely on guests from the "real world" as well as field trips into virtual and non-virtual communities. AMCS Majors may count this course for Fieldwork credit with permission of instructor; a supplemental assignment might be required.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 04: The American School

Semester

SP2018

Section

04

Instructor

Rowhea Elmesky

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers, changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family, policy issues that have shaped the development of schooling in America. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L12 301C

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 02: The American School

Semester

SP2018

Section

02

Instructor

Judy Lamb

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers, changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family, policy issues that have shaped the development of schooling in America. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L12 301C

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 01: The American School

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Michelle Purdy

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers, changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family, policy issues that have shaped the development of schooling in America. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L12 301C

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 3: The American School

Semester

SP2018

Section

3

Instructor

Madonna Riesenmy

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers, changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family, policy issues that have shaped the development of schooling in America. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L12 301C

Register via WebStac

L98-301T section 01: The Automobile is the Devils Wagon: The Appeal, Controversy, and Impact of the Early Automobile

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Dave Walsh

Description

This topics course prepares students to critically engage the complex relationship between technology and American culture, and to read technology as expressive of broader cultural tensions and social, political, and social problems. Such inquiry requires historical and theoretical frameworks for conceptualizing what, exactly, comprises the 'technologic' American imagination, from the early era of the colonies through to the contemporary moment. Building on these frameworks, students will study various forms and incarnations of technology at different moments throughout the history of the U.S., drawing upon multiple disciplinary practices in order to do so. They will also learn how the material characteristics of technology (whether hardware or software, industrial manufacture or DIY) give expression to ideas of national identity and issues of power, politics, race, class, and gender that have emerged in different historical moments. This work will serve as an introduction to the research and study of technology and material culture in America. Topics vary by semester. Please refer to course listings for the current offering.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac

L98-301U section 01: Historical Methods - United States History

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Douglas Flowe

Description

This is a small-group reading course in which students are introduced to the skills essential to the historian's craft. Emphasis will be on acquiring research skills, learning to read historical works critically, and learning to use primary and secondary sources to make a persuasive and original argument. See Course Listings for current topics. Required for history majors. Preference given to History majors; other interested students welcome.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L22 301U

Register via WebStac

L98-3023 section 01: Jazz in American Culture

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Patrick Burke

Description

This course will address the role of jazz within the context of twentieth-century African American and American cultural history, with particular emphasis on the ways in which jazz has shaped, and has been shaped by, ideas about race, gender, economics, and politics. We will make use of recordings and primary sources from the 1910s to the present in order to address the relationship between jazz performances and critical and historical thinking about jazz. This course in not a survey, and students should already be familiar with basic jazz history. Prerequisite: L27-105 or permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L27 3023

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L98-3026 section 01: Home, Bittersweet Home: Histories of Housing and Homeownership in America since 1850

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Michelle Repice

Description

The idea of owning one's own home has been central to realizations of the American dream or the 'good life.' By 1931, Herbert Hoover called the idea "a sentiment deep in the heart of our race and of American life." While the dream continues, the reality of homeownership has been elusive or fraught with struggle and sacrifice for many Americans. If home ownership is such a central part of American identity, why have so many generations of Americans struggled to achieve it? In this course, we explore the histories of different versions of home and homeownership by touching down in different locations at pivotal moments in order to investigate the varied meanings of housing and homeownership in the context of a particular place and time in American history. Using a case-study approach, the course travels across time and space to explore diverse forms of housing, including the following: the big house and slave house in the south under slavery, the immigrant tenement in New York City, the company town in south Chicago, the Midwest homestead, the planned postwar suburban neighborhood, high rise public housing and gated communities. This format exposes students to the important role of federal and local policies as well as themes of housing including: homes as private and domestic realms; housing as a commodity and the largest form of American debt; housing as an icon and encoder of social status; housing as exclusionary and inclusionary; housing as racial or socio-economic discrimination; the suburbs and their discontents; and the recent housing crisis.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

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L98-3041 section 01: Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Rebecca Wanzo

Description

A critical survey of sex and gender in the production, reception, and content of contemporary popular culture. Possible topics include: television, film, advertising, popular fiction, music, comics, internet, foodways, and fashion. Themes include: the representation and stylization of sexed and gendered bodies; popular models of sexual and gendered social relations; production of normative and alternative sex and gender identities through media consumption; sex and gender in systems of popular cultural production.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

L77 304

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L98-305A section 01: Between Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.: Race, Religion, and the Politics of Freedom

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Lerone Martin

Description

This course focuses on the political and spiritual lives of Martin and Malcolm. We will examine their personal biographies, speeches, writings, representations, FBI Files, and legacies as a way to better understand how the intersections of religion, race, and politics came to bare upon the freedom struggles of people of color in the US and abroad. The course also takes seriously the evolutions in both Martin and Malcolm's political approaches and intellectual development, focusing especially on the last years of their respective lives. We will also examine the critical literature that takes on the leadership styles and political philosophies of these communal leaders, as well as the very real opposition and surveillance they faced from state forces like the police and FBI. Students will gain an understanding of what social conditions, religious structures and institutions, and personal experiences led to first the emergence and then the assassinations of these two figures. We will discuss the subtleties of their political analyses, pinpointing the key differences and similarities of their philosophies, approaches, and legacies, and we will apply these debates of the mid-twentieth century to contemporary events and social movements in terms of how their legacies are articulated and what we can learn from them in struggles for justice and recognition in twenty-first century America and beyond.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L57 305

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L98-306M section 01: Visualizing Segregation: A History of St. Louis, Chicago and New Orleans

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Margaret Garb

Eric Mumford

Description

This inter-disciplinary course is designed to introduce you to the history of three of America's major cities. We will explore the political, social, and cultural histories of each of these cities while tracing changes in architecture and the built environment. We chose these three cities for their diverse and intersecting histories. In many ways, St. Louis, Chicago, and New Orleans represent the major social and political forces that forged the modern American city. From westward expansion and the growth of the slave system, through mass European immigration and industrialization, the rise of Jim Crow and the decline of American industry, suburbanization, mass incarceration, and gentrification: all are visible in the landscapes of these American cities. Segregation of social groups, so often seen as natural or inevitable, is the result of historical processes, political decisions, public policies and individual actions. The course, in addition, will provide you with the opportunity to use some of the research techniques employed by urban scholars. We will engage in a major research project, tracing the history of St. Louis through a variety of primary sources. Our aim will be to trace the historical processes that generated urban landscapes divided along lines of race, class, ethnicity or religion.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
A Sense of Place
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

I50 306M

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L98-3073 section 01: The Global War on Terrorism

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Krister Knapp

Description

This course presents an historical assessment of the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) from the perspective of its major participants: militant Sunni Islamist jihadists, especially the Al-Qaeda network, and the nation states that oppose them, particularly the United States and its allies. The course then concludes by analyzing the current state and future of Islamist jihad and the GWOT.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

War & Peace

Program Attributes

Same As

L22 3073

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L98-3073 section 02: The Global War on Terrorism

Semester

SP2018

Section

02

Instructor

Krister Knapp

Description

This course presents an historical assessment of the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) from the perspective of its major participants: militant Sunni Islamist jihadists, especially the Al-Qaeda network, and the nation states that oppose them, particularly the United States and its allies. The course then concludes by analyzing the current state and future of Islamist jihad and the GWOT.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

War & Peace

Program Attributes

Same As

L22 3073

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L98-3094 section 01: Anthropology of Latinxs

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Bolivar

Description

This course will introduce students to the anthropological study of Latinxs.  The approach of this course is deeply intersectional and will focus on the interrelation of Latinx identities and experiences with gender and sexuality. Other key topics include: immigration, the US-Mexico border, marginality and belonging-in both rural and urban settings, Afro-Latinidad, and activism.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

Anthropology L98 3094

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L98-312W section 01: Topics in English and American Literature: The Body in Pain

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Lawton

Description

Since Elaine Scarry's "The Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the World," there has been an abundance of interdisciplinary work dedicated to the representation of pain at every level, from private suffering to public policy. How do we pathologize our feelings, and how can we communicate pain without inflicting it? This course explores a range of discourses about pain, including theoretical and technical ones. To what extent has literature developed special modes of expression for pain, and to what extent is the literary construction of pain gendered and open to cultural change? In addition to Scarry's book, we read a diverse collection of works, including selections from the Bible and Ovid, Freud's "Anna O," Kafka's "In the Penal Colony," W.G. Sebald's "The Emigrants," Wilde's "The Nightingale and the Rose," Woolf's "On Being Ill," and poetry by Nazim Hikmet and Sylvia Plath. Students will be encouraged to draw on personal experience as well as their intellectual resources, and there will be opportunity to write creatively as well as academically. This course is Writing Intensive. Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America

Program Attributes

Same As

English Literature L98 312W

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L98-315A section 01: Topics in American Literature: Disability in 20th-century Fiction: Bodies, Barriers, and Belonging

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Katie Collins

Description

Topics: themes, formal problems, literary genres, special subjects (e.g., the American West, American autobiographical writing). Consult Course Listings for offerings in any given semester.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L14 315

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L98-316F section 01: Rediscovering the Child: Interdisciplinary Workshops in an Urban Middle School

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

R Lorberbaum

Description

It is said that at this time in history the entire country must make a commitment to improve the positive possibilities of education. We must work to lift people who are underserved; we must expand the range of abilities for those who are caught in only one kind of training; and we must each learn to be creative thinkers contributing our abilities to many sectors of our society. In this course, we expand our views about learning by experimenting with the creative process of lateral thinking. In the first six weeks of the semester, we learn about learning by meeting with exceptional people with many scholarly, professional, and civic engagement accomplishments. We also learn by working in teams to develop an exciting set of 2-D / 3-D, hands-on, problem-solving workshops for middle-schoolers from economically disadvantaged urban families; the workshop curriculum will be based upon your knowledge and passion as well as your interests. During the last eight weeks, we deliver these workshops once a week to students at Compton-Drew Middle School (adjacent to the Science Center in the city of St. Louis). In this course we celebrate the choices of studies we each pursue, and expand our experience by learning from each other's knowledge bases and creativity. The course is open to students from all disciplines, schools, freshmen through seniors, and meets the multidisciplinary Fieldwork requirement for AMCS majors.  NOTE: On class days scheduled for the middle school, students must account for transportation time between WU and Compton-Drew so plan accordingly to ensure arrival by 1pm.  To meet compliance with University Policies on Minors, all students participating in this class will be required to undergo a fingerprinting background check, which is done on campus, prior to interacting with the Compton-Drew students. This carries a $50 Lab/materials fee to cover the cost of this check.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

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L98-3181 section 01: Topics in American Literature: The Cultural History of the American Teenager

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Matthew Shipe

Description

This course will explore the recent history of the teenager in the United States, from the rise of teen culture in the 1950s to the current state of adolescence in the new century. Why have so many novels and films memorialized adolescence? How has the period of development been portrayed in recent American fiction? How have depictions and attitudes toward teen culture changed over the past fifty years? We will begin with J.D. Salinger's classic novel of adolescence alienation, "The Catcher in the Rye," a book that in many ways helped initiate the rise of the youth movement in the 1950s and 60s. From there, we will read a series of novels and historical studies that will trace the changes in teen culture that have occurred over the past half century. Our class will also consider a few films, such as "Rebel Without a Cause" and "Dazed and Confused," which have helped shape our conception of the American teenager. Ultimately, we will question what these depictions of teen culture can tell us about larger trends and concerns in American life. Possible readings include John Updike's "The Centaur," Suzanne Collins's "The Hunger Games," and Colson Whitehead's "Sag Harbor." Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture

Program Attributes

Same As

L14 318

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L98-3182 section 02: Topics in American Literature: The Cultural History of the American Teenager

Semester

SP2018

Section

02

Instructor

Matthew Shipe

Description

This course will explore the recent history of the teenager in the United States, from the rise of teen culture in the 1950s to the current state of adolescence in the new century. Why have so many novels and films memorialized adolescence? How has the period of development been portrayed in recent American fiction? How have depictions and attitudes toward teen culture changed over the past fifty years? We will begin with J.D. Salinger's classic novel of adolescence alienation, "The Catcher in the Rye," a book that in many ways helped initiate the rise of the youth movement in the 1950s and 60s. From there, we will read a series of novels and historical studies that will trace the changes in teen culture that have occurred over the past half century. Our class will also consider a few films, such as "Rebel Without a Cause" and "Dazed and Confused," which have helped shape our conception of the American teenager. Ultimately, we will question what these depictions of teen culture can tell us about larger trends and concerns in American life. Possible readings include John Updike's "The Centaur," Suzanne Collins's "The Hunger Games," and Colson Whitehead's "Sag Harbor." Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture

Program Attributes

Same As

L14 318

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L98-3203 section 01: Civic Scholars Program Semester Two: Civic Engagement in Action

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Theresa Kouo

Purvi Patel

Description

This is the second semester, foundation course for students in the Civic Scholars Program of the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement. This course provides students with a context for developing their civic projects. Students engage in a semester long research and project planning process tied to their civic projects. Through research, lectures, workshops, and presentations, students develop a project proposal for their civic projects. Students will meet in class to discuss concepts, engage in critical reflection, and develop l skills. This is a two-credit course. Prerequisite: L98 3202

Credit Hours

2

Weekly Schedule

----F 10:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-3232 section 01: Selected American Writers: James Baldwin Now

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

William Maxwell

Description

Intensive study of one or more American writers. Consult Course Listings for offerings in any given semester.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L14 323

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L98-326 section 01: American Economic History

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Sukkoo Kim

Description

Basic theoretical concepts applied to analyze the changing structure and performance of the American economy from colonial times to the present. Prerequisites: Econ 1011 & 1021.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Early America
Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

L11 326

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L98-329F section 01: Tale of Two Cities: Documenting Our Divides

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Denise Ward-Brown

Description

The metropolitan St. Louis area has become the nation's symbol of modern segregation erupting into urban unrest and violence foiled against non-violent direct-action interventions, youth driven social protests and grassroots revitalization. With the assistance of a faculty seed grant from the Divided City Initiative, in partnership with the Center for the Humanities in Arts & Sciences and the Mellon Foundation, Tale of Two Cities: Documenting Our Divides will bring together students working in trans-disciplinary teams to create documentary videos of street events, meetings and interviews that capture the immediacy of this historical moment. Students will partner and engage with a local nonprofit organization, grassroots movement or religious institution. Topics can include personal and/or institutional issues of a 'divided city' that are exacerbated by race, gender, economic status, sexual orientation or geography. Successful completion of this course involves researching and creating a short video with a distinctive perspective and point of view that will draw upon the team's collaborative voices from history, performing arts, economics, law, social work, African American studies, architecture and art. Skills will be developed in the fundamentals of story development, video and audio-capture in the field, editing with Adobe Premier and archival preservation. No prerequisites.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-4:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK
MD

Same As

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES L98 329F

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L98-3301 section 01: History of American Cinema

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Gaylyn Studlar

Description

This course traces the history of the American cinema from the earliest screenings in vaudeville theaters through the birth of the feature film to movies in the age of video. The course will examine both the contributions of individual filmmakers as well as he determining contexts of modes of production, distribution, and exhibition. The course aims to provide an understanding of the continuing evolution of the American cinema, in its internal development, in its incorporation of new technologies, and in its responses to other national cinemas. Required screenings.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

L53 330

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L98-330C section 01: Culture & Identity: The Politics of Black Criminality and Popular Protest

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Douglas Flowe

Description

This course will explore the meanings and perceptions of black criminality in modern American culture. It will consider issues of rioting and racial violence; movements ranging from hip-hop to black power; the crucial matter of police brutality; and cultural associations between criminality and black masculinity. Our work will be informed by an awareness of the historical interactions between African Americans and legal and other systems of authority: in particular, the ambiguous boundaries of legality under slavery, post-emancipation convict leasing, Jim Crow laws, black gangs and the functions of illegal acts in the lives of black citizens. The class will give special attention to the ways that popular thought, imagination, and culture-and particularly black thought and culture--have addressed crime. How does criminality connect to popular forms of protest, resistance and discussions about inequality and identity?

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-330D section 01: Culture and Identity: Urban Ethnography in St. Louis

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Jasmine Mahmoud

Description

How do we productively begin to observe and document the urban life around us? What possibilities arise from studying the city through ethnographic field methods? What are the political stakes of doing the crucial work of observation and documentation? These are the questions of urban ethnography, the deep study of urban life, environment, and culture. In this course, we begin with observation, learning tools to observe and document urban life. Readings cover ethnographic methods and also include classic and contemporary urban ethnographies that consider the city in conversation with issues of race, inequality, and identity such as poverty, segregation, processes of displacement, gentrification, neoliberalism, and cultural and expressive practices. The course also includes several fieldtrips to observe sites of culture in St. Louis such as Euclid Ave., Cherokee Street, and the Missouri History Museum, as well as the DUC and sites on campus. Throughout the course, students will practice ethnographic methods (including observation, writing field notes, conducting interviews, and documenting sights and sounds) to produce an ethnographic research project about a site of culture in St. Louis. The course fulfills the Fieldwork Requirement for American Culture Studies Majors.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK
MD

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L98-341A section 01: Gender in Society

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Caitlyn Collins

Description

Introduction to the sociological study of gender. The primary focus is U.S. society, but we will also discuss gender in an international context. From the moment of birth, boys and girls are treated differently. Gender structures the experiences of people in all major social institutions, including the family, the workplace, and schools. We will explore how gender impacts lives and life chances. The central themes of the course are historical changes in gender beliefs and practices; socialization practices that reproduce gender identities; how race/ethnicity, class, and sexuality shape the experience of gender; and the relationship between gender, power, and social inequality. Prerequisite: introductory course in sociology or consent of the instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L40 3410

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L98-343 section 01: Constitutional Law

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Lee Epstein

Description

Introduction to constitutional law and practice in the United States. Emphasis on the role of the U.S. Supreme Court as an interpreter of the Constitution

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

L32 3431

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L98-3465 section 01: Race, Literature, and Enfironmental Justice

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Young

Description

The course will permit an introduction to the field of Environmental Humanities through an exploration of environmental writings, practices, and artistic expressions. We will draw primarily from literature, as well as legal proceedings, history, culture, art, and digital media in order to understand the relationship between human beings and natural and built environments. We will also examine the interaction of health and well-being to the physical environment, with attention to women, people of color, and the poor as a way of thinking expansively about environmental justice issues. While social inequality shapes how environmental problems are created, recognized, and dealt with, we will explore how differences of culture and power complicate the meaning of concepts like "environment" and "justice" within and between groups. To do so, we will examine the specific roles the humanities have played in facilitating an environmental consciousness and activism amongst various groups of people. We will begin by posing questions regarding what is nature in order to think more expansively about what the term "environment" can denote.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

AFAS L98 3465

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L98-346A section 01: The Politics of Privacy in the Digital Age

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Alfred Darnell

Description

This course explores the changing nature of privacy in contemporary society

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

L32 3462

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L98-347A section 01: Global Energy and the American Dream

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Bret Gustafson

Description

This lecture course explores the historical, cultural, and political relationship between America and global energy, focusing on oil, coal, natural gas, biofuels, and alternatives. Through case studies at home and abroad, we examine how cultural, environmental, economic, and geopolitical processes are entangled with changing patterns of energy-related resource extraction, production, distribution, and use. America's changing position as global consumer and dreamer is linked to increasingly violent contests over energy abroad while our fuel-dependent dreams of boundless (oil) power give way to uncertainties and new possibilities of nation, nature, and the future. Assuming that technology and markets alone will not save us, what might a culturally, politically, and socially-minded inquiry contribute to understanding the past and future of global energy and the American dream?

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L48 3472

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L98-3482 section 01: Rethinking the 'Second Wave': Race, Sexuality and Class in the Feminist Movement

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Andrea Friedman

Description

The U.S. women's movement has been called "the twentieth century's most influential movement," but until recently assessments of its origins, characteristics, and impact have been largely impressionistic and subjective, left to movement participants and popular culture. Building on a recent explosion of historical studies of American feminism, this course examines the history of the so-called "second wave" of the women's movement from its origins in the early 1960s to its alleged demise in the late 1980s. Topics to be covered include the origins of feminist activism; the traditional history of the women's movement and recent revisions; how race and class shaped the feminist movement; how feminist ideas and organizing transformed American society; feminism and individual experience; and responses to the women's movement. In this discussion-based course, we read scholarly analyses of the women's movement as well as memoirs, popular essays, and many primary documents from the period.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L77 348

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L98-351 section 01: History of Electronic Media: From Radio to Television to Digital

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Michelle Kelley

Description

This course traces the history of electronic media as they have become the dominant source for entertainment and information in contemporary culture, starting with over-the-air broadcasting of radio and television through to cable and the 'narrowcasting' achieved by digital technologies. While some attention will be paid to other national industries, the chief focus of the course will be on electronic media in the United States to determine, in part, the transformative role they have played in the cultural life of the nation. The course will explore the relationship of the electronic media industries to the American film industry, determining how their interactions with the film industry helped mutually shape the productions of both film and electronic media. Required screenings.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

L53 350

Register via WebStac

L98-3512 section 01: Model Minority: The Asian American Experience

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

LinLing Gao-Miles

Description

As an introductory course to Asian American Studies, this course explores key issues in the field revolving around the concept of 'model minority.' It explores the origins of this concept, analyzes the social discourses about Asian Americans as a model minority, and through interrogations of complex experiences and heterogeneity among Asian Americans (including Pacific Islanders) it aims to dismantle the model minority myth. This course is designed to respond to the students' interest in Asian American Studies as well as to fit into the broader discussion on campus about race and ethnicity in the United States. It approaches race and ethnicity by focusing on one designated pan-ethnic group, and uses multidisciplinary inquiries inspired by the fields of history, sociology, anthropology, law and education, all of which are concerned with the conceptual framework of 'model minority'.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L97 3512

Register via WebStac

L98-3550 section 01: Sociology of Work

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Koji Chavez

Description

Sociological understanding of work, and in particular, how work reduces or replicates inequality. Classic and contemporary sociological theories of work; how work in the U.S. has changed over time; and how workers are matched to 'good' and 'bad' jobs. Threaded through the course is the exploration of barriers to racial, gender, and class inclusion and advancement at work. We will explore how organizational structures, policies, and practices can increase or decrease those barriers. Prerequisite: introductory course in sociology or consent of the instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L40 3550

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L98-3561 section 01: Law, Gender, and Justice

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Susan Appleton

Description

This course (formerly called 'Women and the Law') explores how social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexuality have shaped traditional legal reasoning and American legal concepts, including women's legal rights. We will begin by placing our current legal framework, and its gender, race, sexuality, and other societal assumptions, in an historical and Constitutional context. We will then examine many of the questions raised by feminist theory, feminist jurisprudence, and other critical perspectives. For example, is the legal subject gendered male, and, if so, how can advocates (or women and men) use the law to gain greater equality? What paradoxes have emerged in areas such as employment discrimination, family law, or reproductive rights, as women and others have sought liberal equality? What is the equality/difference debate about and why is it important for feminists? How do intersectionality and various schools of feminist thought affect our concepts of discrimination, equality, and justice? The course is thematic, but we will spend time on key cases that have influenced law and policy, examining how they affect the everyday lives of women. Over the years, this course has attracted WGSS students and pre-law students. This course is taught by law students under the supervision of a member of the School of Law faculty. In Spring 2017, Jesse Doggendorf, Sapna Khatri, Rebecca Swarm, and Sarah Watson will be teaching this course under the supervision of Professor Susan Appleton. STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN L77 3561 WOMEN AND THE LAW CAN NOT TAKE THIS CLASS.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

L77 3561

Register via WebStac

L98-3575 section 01: US Foreign Policy: Theory and Practice

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Jeremy Caddel

Description

In this class we will focus on the procedures and institutions that shape US foreign policy decisions. This is neither a course on international relations theory nor a history of US foreign policy. Rather, this course examines the domestic politics surrounding US foreign policy decisions. How do public opinion, electoral politics, and interest groups shape foreign policy? Which branch controls foreign policy-the president, Congress, the courts? Or is it ultimately the foreign affairs bureaucracy that pulls the strings? We will examine these topics through reading and writing assignments, class discussion, and simulations to promote deeper understanding and build practical skills.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 8:30-10:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

L97 3575

Register via WebStac

L98-366 section 01: The Living American Civil War

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Iver Bernstein

Description

This course focuses on the Civil War and Reconstruction as the central drama of American life in the 19th century, and also, the central event of American history itself, to the present day. How do we begin to understand the significance of the killing fields of the American Civil War, its three quarters of a million dead? The bloody conflict, and its causes and consequences, are explored from multiple perspectives: those of individuals such as Lincoln, McClellan, Davis, Douglass, Grant, Longstreet, and Lee, who made momentous choices of the era; of groups such as the African American freedpeople and the Radical Republicans, whose struggles for freedom and power helped shape the actions of individuals; and of the historians, novelists, filmmakers and social movements that have fought to define the war's legacy for modern America. How is the Civil War both long ended and, at the same time, very much alive and still contested in contemporary America? How has it shaped modern Americans' eruptive engagement with race?

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Early America
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
War & Peace

Program Attributes

Same As

HISTORY L98 366

Register via WebStac

L98-3730 section 01: History of the United States Foreign Relations to 1914

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Elizabeth Borgwardt

Description

This course explores the major diplomatic, political, legal, and economic issues shaping U.S. Foreign Relations in the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries, up until the U.S. entry into the First World War.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

L22 373

Register via WebStac

L98-3755 section 01: Disability, Quality of Life & Community Responsibility

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Kathleen Kniepmann

Description

The increasing prevalence of disability presents major challenges for American society. Social participation can be a challenge for people with disabilities, while resources to address these needs tend to be limited. This course will begin by critically analyzing concepts of disability, Quality of Life, health and social participation. We will construct a framework for examining social participation and community resources across the lifespan. Public health, educational and environmental theories and methods will be applied to programs and services that aim to enhance quality of life with disabilities. We will analyze ecological approaches to enhancing social participation. Upon completion of this course, students will be equipped to analyze challenges and prioritize resources for individual and population health.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L43 375

Register via WebStac

L98-375A section 01: Methods & Visions: Audiences, Spectators, and Fans

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Noah Cohan

Description

The course will examine American entertainments and the cultures fostered by those who consume them. We will traverse American history to explore audiences of literature, music, sports, film, and television, paying particular attention to the methods by which those audiences have been depicted, critiqued, and studied. We will ask: how have audience behaviors and communities impacted American identity with regard to gender, sexuality, race, and class? What is the difference between an audience member, a spectator, and a fan? How do these modes of reception impact the formation of identity? Is there something particularly American about them that distinguish them in a global context? 

Students will write a series of short essays preparing for a final independent and multidisciplinary project. As a Writing Intensive course, AMCS 375A also serves as an occasion for students to think about matters of argument and presentation, and to develop ideas and models for future research. This course is intended for AMCS Juniors but all are welcome. Students will place themselves on the waitlist and then will be enrolled manually by the registrar, with priority given to AMCS majors and minors. This course fulfills the "multidisciplinary" (MD) requirement for Minors and fulfills the "Methods Seminar" requirements for Majors.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-378A section 01: Topics in IR: U.S. Law and Foreign Relations

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Jeremy Caddel

Description

This course is intended primarily for sophomores and juniors. The topic of this course varies by semester, dependent on faculty and student interests.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 8:30-10:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
War & Peace

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L32 378

Register via WebStac

L98-378B section 01: Contemporary American Theater

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Paige McGinley

Description

This course is a focused investigation of the aesthetic, political, and urban landscapes of the contemporary American theatre. We will read published and unpublished plays, familiarize ourselves with the country's most important companies, festivals, and institutions, and discuss issues facing the American theatre now. We will explore the role of the arts in urban planning and development, and address the relationship between higher education and arts institutions, paying particular attention to ideas of community engagement and social justice work undertaken by both. Artists to be studied may include Tony Kushner, Suzan-Lori Parks, Caryl Churchill, Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, Lynn Nottage, Young Jean Lee, and Lin-Manuel Miranda. This course will include a mandatory class trip at the end of March to the Humana Festival of New American Plays in Louisville, Kentucky. Students will prepare for this trip by reading the works of featured playwrights and establishing a research project that will be carried out on-site. Findings from the research project will be presented upon the return to St. Louis. Admission to the course is by instructor permission only; an application form will be sent to all registered students at the conclusion of the registration period. In consultation with and with the permission of the instructor, this course may fulfill the Fieldwork requirement for American Culture Studies majors.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M---F 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK
MD

Same As

DRAMA L98 378B

Register via WebStac

L98-3807 section 01: Topics in Religious Studies: Religion, Transnationalism and Diaspora

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Elena Kravchenko

Description

This course explores one of the various topics in East Asian Religions. The Spring 2018 course topic was 'Religion, Transnationalism and Diaspora'.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 8:30-10:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L23 3801

Register via WebStac

L98-3840 section 01: Gender & Consumer Culture in U.S. Fiction of the Late 19th and Early 20th Century

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Beth Fisher

Description

The decades between the end of the Civil War and the 1930s saw the rise of a mass consumer culture that would dramatically reshape America. The fiction writers of this period, keen to capture the spirit of the age, helped to create the enduring idea that consumerism and an orientation toward material acquisition are at the heart of gendered concepts of American identity. Their stories documented, and sometimes celebrated, the emergence of recognizable "types" of American womanhood and manhood-such as self-made millionaires, ambitious "working girls," bargain-hunting middle-class housewives, and the commercially minded women and men of the social and intellectual elite. At the same time, their stories articulated anxieties about U.S. consumer culture and its impact on the world. Students in this course will read, discuss, and write about novels and short stories by writers such as Henry James, Mary Wilkins Freeman, Kate Chopin, Theodore Dreiser, Edith Wharton, Nella Larsen, Langston Hughes, and F. Scott Fitzgerald. Students in the course will also examine primary materials such as magazine advertisements, and will read and respond to relevant scholarship on the period. Writing Intensive Course

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture

Program Attributes

Same As

L77 384

Register via WebStac

L98-386A section 01: Topics in African-American Literature

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Zafar

Description

This class/directed reading group will focus on approximately the first century of African American publications-of autobiographies and novels, manifestos and newspaper editorials.  Although many works by early Black writers are now available in print-Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs spring instantly to mind-many more can be accessed through digital archives.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Early America
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

AFAS L98 386A

Register via WebStac

L98-391 section 01: Gender Violence

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Jami Ake

Description

This course explores the issue of violence against women within families, by strangers in the workplace, and within the context on international and domestic political activity. In each area, issues of race, class, culture, and sexuality are examined as well as legal, medical and sociological responses. Readings cover current statistical data, research, and theory as well as information on the history of the battered women's movement, the rape crisis center movement, violent repression of women's political expressions internationally, and the effect of violence on immigrant and indigenous women in the U.S. and abroad. NOT OPEN TO STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN U92 363 WoSt. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L77 393

Register via WebStac

L98-3961 section 01: Gender and Social Class

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Linda Nicholson

Trevor Sangrey

Description

This course examines the intersection of class and gender from the late 19th century to the present. It begins by asking how a focus on women challenges conventional notions of class. Some of the topics covered include women, race, and class; class and family formation; women, class, and globalization; class and feminist politics; women and work; class and domestic labor; women and unionization; and class and sexual identity. The emphasis is on women and class in the U.S., but includes analysis of women and class in a broader, global context. This course examines these topics using non-fictional and fictional texts. Prerequisites: one 100 or 200 level Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Course or permission of instructor. STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN L77 3561 WOMEN AND SOCIAL CLASS CAN NOT TAKE THIS CLASS.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L77 396

Register via WebStac

L98-3970 section 01: W.E.B. Du Bois: His Life, Thought, & Legacy

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Vieyra

Description

In particular, we will use the biographies about and the autobiographies by Du Bois to trace and learn about his life and the times in which he lived. Next, we will read most or all of The Philadelphia Negro (1899), Black Reconstruction in America (1935), The Souls of Black Folk (1903), John Brown (1909), and Black Princess (1928), each an example, respectively, of his sociology, history, essays, biography, and literature. Next, we will reassess his legacy within and without scholarship, especially focusing on his impact on Sociology, History, Political Science, and Anthropology. Lastly, we will take a closer look at several of his most influential views and concepts, including the talented tenth, double consciousness, the veil, and the psychological wages of race. In this, we will also consider his disagreement and rivalry with Booker T. Washington (and others) as well as his views on and relationship to race, gender, sexuality, and art.

The overall goal of the course is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the life, thought, and legacy of W.E.B. Du Bois. Through class activities and course assignments, students should also improve their critical analysis, reading, and writing skills. While a previous course in African and African-American Studies, History, or Sociology may be helpful, there are no prerequisites to the course.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

AFAS L98 3970

Register via WebStac

L98-400B section 01: AMCS Capstone Workshop II

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Noah Cohan

Description

This course is required for students planning to complete the Latin Honors thesis or a 6-credit non-honors project through American Culture Studies. It builds on work done in L98 400A: AMCS Capstone Workshop I, and involves periodic workshops and conferences with the instructor and project advisor(s) during the final stages of thesis preparation. Alternatively, students seeking to earn an additional 1-2 credits for their one-semester capstone will enroll in this course after their petition to expand their capstone has been approved and expectations have been defined in consultation with the capstone advisor and workshop instructor. Prereq: Satisfactory standing as a candidate for a two-semester capstone, including successful completion of L98 400A Capstone Workshop I and permission of project advisor. Latin Honors eligible students must meet the University GPA minimum. Credit variable, max. 3 units. Course will meet every other week, time/date to be determined based on participants' schedules.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-4036 section 01: Children of Immigrants: Identity and Acculturation

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

LinLing Gao-Miles

Description

This seminar examines two sub-groups: child immigrants and the native-born children of immigrants. It interrogates cultural/ethnic identity, cultural adaptation, bilingualism and biculturalism, and challenges and achievements of this young generation through ethnography, literature, and sociological accounts. We aim to scrutinize the studies of the '1.5' generation and the second generation, and theories such as 'segmented assimilation,' across a wide range of ethnic groups, from people of East Asian origins to those with Latin American ancestries, by mainly focusing on their experiences in the United States.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L97 4036

Register via WebStac

L98-4060 section 01: Sexual Health and the City: A Community-Based Learning Course

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Shanti Parikh

Description

In this community-based learning course students will partner with a St. Louis AIDS service organization (ASO) or sexual health agency to explore how the interrelationships among gender, class, race/ethnicity, and sexual identity shape sexual health decisions, outcomes, and access to services. Students will also examine the complex relationship between men's and women's life goals and constraints, on the one hand, and the public health management of sexual health, on the other. In collaboration with their community partner and its clients, students will develop a project that addresses an identified need of the organization and the community it serves. Course readings will draw from the fields of anthropology, public health, feminist studies, and policy-making. The prerequisite for the course is L48 4134 (The AIDS Epidemic) or permission from the instructor, which will be determined based on past student's experience in the fields of medical anthropology or sexual/reproductive health.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 2:00-5:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK
MD

Same As

L90 406

Register via WebStac

U89-420 section 01: History of American Architecture

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Michael Allen

Description

This course examines the ideological, political, economic and social determinants that have shaped the look of American architecture. Throughout readings that will include a survey text in addition to topical works covering the social history of housing, the vernacular architecture of Las Vegas and the rise (and fall, and rise) of Frank Lloyd Wright, students will learn the definitive characteristics of American architecture. A central point of study will be examining contradictory tendencies in the American practice of architecture: the embrace of exceptionalism through modern forms and styles representing a new national identity, occurring alongside the emulation of classical and European precedents to legitimate a new nation's buildings. The readings will illuminate how the characteristics of American architecture reveal the social, economic and political structures of its production. Ultimately, students will be able to read an American building to discern evidence of national identity, individual political agency, the evolution of gender roles, the assertion of disciplinary and economic power, and the evolution of the American artistic sensibility. This course will count toward major in American Culture Studies for day students. This course fulfills the Humanities distribution requirement for the AMCS MA program. It also counts towards the MD and some concentration area requirements for the AMCS Major and Minor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T----- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Early America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac

L98-4203 section 01: Civic Scholars Program Semester Four: Civic Engagement across the Lifespan

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Theresa Kouo

Stefani Weeden-Smith

Description

This is the fourth semester course for students in the Civic Scholars Program of the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement. This culminating course provides students with the opportunity to integrate the Civic Scholars experience, explore civic engagement opportunites post-college, and discuss ethics and civic engagement. Through group discussions, readings, lectures, and guest speakers, students 1) understand civic engagement over the life course; 2) discuss ethics and civic engagement; and 3) develop a one-, five-, ten-, and twenty-year civic vision. This one-credit course meets weekly for one hour during the spring semester. Students are expected to take an active role in their learning through sharing their experiences, engaging with reading material, and participating in reflection exercises. Prerequisite: L98 3202, L98 3203 AND L98 4202

Credit Hours

1

Weekly Schedule

--W-- 5:00-6:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-4280 section 01: History of Urban Schooling in the United States

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Michelle Purdy

Description

More than ever, schooling in urban areas is researched and is at the center of debates for improving U.S. schooling. This course, framed by contemporary issues, focuses on the history of urban schooling and policy to deepen our understanding of the contemporary landscape. We will focus on particular cities and their school districts. Such districts may include New York, Boston, Chicago, Detroit, St.  Louis, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Atlanta. In this course students will develop a strong contextual understanding of the conditions of urban schooling, the history of urban school reform, and the debates over the purposes of urban schools, past and present. 

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

Education L98 4280

Register via WebStac

L98-4289 section 01: Neighborhoods, Schools, and Social Inequality

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Odis Johnson

Description

A major purpose of the course is to study the research and policy literature related to neighborhoods, schools and the corresponding opportunity structure in urban America. The course will be informed by theoretical models drawn from economics, political science, sociology, anthropology, education and law. A major focus is to gain greater understanding of the experiences and opportunity structure(s) of urban dwellers, in general, and urban youth, in particular. While major emphasis will be placed on data derived from the interface of urban environments and the corresponding institutions within them, the generational experiences of various ethnic groups will complement the course foci.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L12 4289

Register via WebStac

L98-440A section 01: Religion, Politics, and the University

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

John Inazu

Description

This course explores in depth current issues related to pluralism, difference, and belonging in matters pertaining to religion and other important issues, with a particular focus on how these play out in the university context. The instructors, John Inazu and Eboo Patel, are two of the leading national commentators on these issues. Prerequisite: Students enrolling in this class must submit a brief statement of interest to Professor John Inazu at jinazu@wustl.edu prior to the start of class.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T----- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L57 440

Register via WebStac

L98-448W section 01: Current Macroeconomic Issues

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Steven Fazzari

Description

Review and extension of macroeconomic models from Econ 4021 from a comparative perspective and use of these models to analyze current macroeconomic and policy issues. Topics include recession and recovery, long-term growth, saving and social security, investment, and monetary policy. Multiple writing assignments that emphasize critical analysis of theoretical perspectives and readings applied to current macroeconomic topics. Writing will be revised to improve logical structure, clarity, and style. Enrollment limited to 15 students with priority given to senior economics majors. Prerequisite: Econ 4021. PLEASE NOTE: Requests for on-line registration will be wait listed. Refer to emailed advising memo from D Petersen for further details.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 9:30-11:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

L11 448W

Register via WebStac

L98-4501 section 01: Tennessee Williams: Playwright

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Henry Schvey

Description

Topics in American Drama

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L15 453

Register via WebStac

L98-453 section 01: Sociology of Education

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Ebony Duncan

Description

This course provides an overview of sociological theory and research on education in contemporary U.S. society. Drawing from sociological perspectives, it covers the implications of schools and schooling for social inequality, mobility, and group relations. It examines major theoretical perspectives on the purpose and social organization of mass education in the United States, and topics related to the organization and function of schools, access to educational resources, and group disparities in school experiences and outcomes.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L12 453B

Register via WebStac

L98-457A section 01: From Vitaphone to YouTube: Popular Music and the Moving Image

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Todd Decker

Description

This course considers American popular music as represented in audiovisual media from 1926 to the present. The relationship between the popular music industry (a commercial sphere oriented primarily towards the selling of sheet music and audio recordings) and audiovisual technologies (various screens and formats encountered in changing social and commercial contexts) will be explored along two complementary tracks: popular music performers as presented in performance-centered media and popular music as a narrative topic or resource in feature films. Three related analytical frames will shape our discussions: industrial and technological history (the material conditions for the making and distribution of popular music and moving images): the question of 'liveness' in recorded audiovisual media; aesthetics of various popular music styles as translated into audiovisual forms and contexts. The course is in seminar format. The ability to read music is not required but students with music reading or transcription skills will be encouraged to draw upon these tools. Pre-requisites: graduate status or completion of a 300-level FMS or Music course and permission of the instructor

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 8:30-10:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

L53 457

Register via WebStac

L98-4581 section 01: Major Film Directors: Alfred Hitchcock

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Maciak

Description

This is a course about director Alfred Hitchcock and the "Hitchcockians"-- filmmakers who modeled their movies on his innovations, critics and theorists who use his work as problematic case studies or perfect examples, viewers who have seen the crises of their world through the funhouse mirror of his films.  In tracing the outlines of Hitchcock's long career, we will pair seven of his greatest films with the films and film theories they inspired, many of them reflecting the critical and creative legacy of feminist and queer theory.  In each pairing, the contemporary film is, in some way, a critical revision of Hitchcock's original, one that is revelatory of Hitchcock's brilliance and blindnesses.  Pairings will likely include Psycho with Harron's American Psycho, Rebecca with Jane Campion's The Piano,  Rear Window with Bigelow's Zero Dark Thirty, Vertigo with Fincher's Gone Girl.  By the end of the course, students will have a deep understanding of the way that Hitchcock's movies live on in the visual culture we see around us and the ways we have learned to see it.  REQUIRED SCREENINGS: Thursdays @ 7pm.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

American Culture Studies L98 4581

Register via WebStac

L98-4584 section 01: Contemporary Fiction

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Melanie Micir

Description

What is the contemporary novel? What relation does it have to modernist and postmodernist fiction? Is there a set of aesthetic characteristics or historical markers that allow us to recognize it as specifically contemporary? How does the contemporary novel react to (and, in some cases, incorporate) new media technologies? How is it affected by the dynamics of globalization, translation, and global ('rotten') Englishes? And what is the relationship between the contemporary novel and contemporary literary criticism-not just scholarly essays, but magazine, journal, and newspaper articles, blog posts, podcasts, and social media conversations? This class will investigate these questions by reading a wide variety of very recent novels alongside both academic and popular literary criticism. Students will produce individual essays and a collaborative podcast. Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L14 4584

Register via WebStac

L98-4591 section 01: Philosophies of Education

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Garrett Duncan

Description

An examination of distinct educational philosophies (traditional, progressive, and radical) and an analysis of perennial topics in the philosophy of education (educational goals, the teacher's and student's roles, and curricular content). Discussion of such recent themes as gender relations and education, democracy and education, and moral values and education. Seminar format.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

---T--- 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L12 459F

Register via WebStac

L98-461B section 01: Construction and Experience of Black Adolescence

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Garrett Duncan

Description

This course examines the construct of black adolescence from the general perspectives of anthropology, sociology, and psychology. It begins by studying the construct of black adolescence as an 'invention' of the social and behavioral sciences. The course then draws upon narrative data, autobiography, literature and multimedia sources authored by black youth to recast black adolescence as a complex social, psychological, cultural and political phenomenon. This course focuses on the meaning-making experiences of urban-dwelling black adolescents and highlights these relations within the contexts of class, gender, sexuality, and education.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L90 461B

Register via WebStac

U89-465 section 01: Studies in American Cultural Identity: Beginnings to the Civil War

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Allen Schwab

Description

An exploration of early American literary, visual, and musical art in relation to key themes, decisive moments, and cultural developments which have shaped our national character and influenced our first internationally recognized artists, as the formation of a distinctly American art begins. Struggles for religious, racial, and gender rights, American violence, polarities of innocence and experience, individualism and conformity, The American Dream and its dreamers, all receive attention. Viewing of American Neoclassical and Romantic visual art and architecture, listening to colonial, Federalist, Jacksonian and post-Jacksonian era songs and ballads, and reading from major and less well known 17th, 18th, and 19th Century literary and historical figures. This course counts for the AMCS Major and Minor and fulfills the Humanities or Arts distribution requirement for the AMCS M.A. Program.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 6:00-8:30

Concentration Areas

Early America
Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-470 section 01: American Intellectual History Since 1865

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Krister Knapp

Description

This course concentrates on social, cultural, philosophical and political thought since the end of the Civil War, and investigates how American thinkers have responded to the challenge of modernity. After an examination of the end of the old religious order and the revolt against Victorianism, it analyzes the subsequent rise of pragmatism, progressivism, literary modernism, radical liberalism, political realism, protest movements and the New Left, neo-conservatism and the New Right, and the current state of intellectuals in post-911 America.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L22 469

Register via WebStac

L98-4751 section 01: Reformers and Radicals: Feminist Thinking through History

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Mary Ann Dzuback

Description

We focus on feminist thought in Western culture but also examine nonWestern ideas about feminisms. We trace the relationship among emergent feminist ideas and such developments as the rise of scientific methodology, Enlightenment thought, revolutionary movements and the gendering of the political subject, colonialism, romanticism, socialism, and global feminisms. Readings are drawn from both primary sources and recent feminist scholarship on the texts under consideration. NOTE: This course is in the core curriculum for the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies graduate certificate. Permission of instructor required. Prerequisite: Completion of at least one Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies course or permission of the instructor. STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN L77 475 INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF FEMINISM CAN NOT TAKE THIS CLASS.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M------ 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L77 475

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L98-476 section 01: The City in American Arts and Popular Culture, 1900-1940

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Angela Miller

Description

From the mid-nineteenth century forward, artists, writers, sociologists, and cultural critics have identified the city as the primary site of a vast array of historical changes associated with modernization. This course will explore the range of cultural responses to the new 20th century city up to World War II. The American city was seen as both an incubator of difference, and of mass conformity and manipulation; a dynamic space in which to form fluid networks that catalyzed new forms of creativity, and a place of strangers and social alienation. We will trace the history of these polarized responses in the 20th century arts and literature of the city, looking at the vibrant popular culture of film, vaudeville, and cross-dressing; new aesthetic forms such as collage and expressionism; and new urban subjects. Prereqs: 300-level course in American 20th c. Cultural History, American Art, Literature, or permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

---T--- 6:00-9:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
A Sense of Place
Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L01 475

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L98-4792 section 01: Globalization and National Politics

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Michael Bechtel

Description

This seminar examines globalization and its interaction with national politics. The movement of ideas, capital, goods, services, production, and people across national borders and provide a skeletal framework for the global political economy. Politicians, policy makers, and societies discover new opportunities, but also dilemmas as expanding interdependence challenge traditional notions of sovereignty and national policy autonomy. Prerequisites: L32 102 or L32 103.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

POLITICAL SCIENCE L98 4792

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L98-483 section 01: Selected American Writers: Melville

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

Robert Milder

Description

Concentrated study of one or two major American writers, e.g., Gertrude Stein and Richard Wright; Emily Dickinson. Consult Course Listings each semester for specific authors.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Early America

Program Attributes

Same As

L14 483

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L98-4952 section 01: AMCS Senior Workshop

Semester

SP2018

Section

01

Instructor

M�ire Murphy

Description

In this new one-credit workshop AMCS Majors work with program mentors and peers to develop their portfolio and prepare for the public presentation of their capstone research. In developing the portfolio students create a record of their growth in the major: they bring together materials that represent their learning and reflect on how they have realized, and moved beyond, priorities they set for themselves. Students also consider how they can apply their learning in AMCS to post-college endeavors. Translating research findings for a public audience is an important component of the major experience, and an aspect of the portfolio work. In the workshop students produce a presentation of their capstone project for the AMCS Spring Colloquium. They also have the chance to explore venues for a wider audience, beyond the colloquium (e.g., publication, digital presence). Activities include written reflections, peer feedback on presentations, and discussion with guests from the AMCS community, including faculty and alums. Prerequisite: AMCS Majors in their final semester at the university.

Credit Hours

4

Weekly Schedule

M------ 4:00-5:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

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