course listings, SU2019

Undergraduate Courses

Every semester, AMCS posts our home-based and cross-listed courses on a custom webpage where students can sort courses by level, concentration, designation, and instructor. These are the same courses as listed in WebStac, but with information specific to the major and minor, like concentration area and requirement. Select from the nav bar below to review the list for the upcoming semester.

  •  
  • TERM
  • LEVEL
  • CONCENTRATION AREA
  • REQUIREMENTS
  • INSTRUCTOR
  •  
  •  
  • SU2019

  •  

L98-2010 section 21: Religion and American Society

Semester

SU2019

Section

21

Instructor

Griffith

Description

This course explores religious life in the United States. We will focus our study on groups and movements that highlight distinctive ways of being both "religious" and "American," including the Americanization of global religions in the US context. Major themes will include religious encounter and conflict; secularization, resurgent traditionalism, and new religious establishments; experimentalism, eclecticism, and so-called "spiritual" countercultures; the relationship between religious change and broader social and political currents (including clashes over race, class, gender, and sexuality); and the challenges of religious multiplicity in the US. You will: 1) acquire knowledge of the disparate religions practiced in North America during the twentieth century and beyond; 2) examine some of the chief conflicts as well as alliances between religion and the American social order in a global context; and 3) develop interpretive tools for understanding religionĀ“s present and enduring role in the US and the world.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MTWRF 3:00-4:45

Concentration Areas

20th Century America

Program Attributes

Same As

American Culture Studies L98 2010

Register via WebStac

L98-220 section 21: Topics in AMCS: Race and American Popular Music

Semester

SU2019

Section

21

Instructor

Kinney

Description

In 2018, opposition ads attacked Antonio Delgado, an African American New York congressional candidate, for his past performances as a rapper. In response, Delgado's supporters accused his critics of racism, pointing out that his prior musical career should have no bearing on his ability to represent his constituents. In the process both sides highlighted the means by which one of the most popular musical genres of the last 40 years remains indelibly racialized. The interrelated histories of race, popular music, and power in American life reverberate through Delgado's story and through the everyday cultural lives of Americans. This course surveys American popular music through the lens of race. Weighted toward the twentieth century, we will study the role of genre marketing, segregation, migration, and other factors on the production and reception of popular music. Our study will consider both the cultural systems that generate and maintain racialization in American society and notable figures who have operated within and upon those systems, including artists such as Louis Armstrong, Elvis Presley, Tina Turner, and Miley Cyrus. We will explore multiple popular genres including minstrelsy, jazz, rock, soul, country, and hip-hop. While our course will primarily cover the musical conduits between black and white Americans, we will also touch on the music of other ethnicities and immigrant groups. Our analysis will incorporate methods from the fields of musicology, history, and cultural studies. Student assignments will include reading, listening, online discussion, and in-class discussion components. The ability to read music is not required for this class. Attendance is mandatory during the first week.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MTWRF 11:00-12:45

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-276 section 41: The American City

Semester

SU2019

Section

41

Instructor

Allen

Description

The American city has multiple forms: as a place to live and work, as a measure of economic vitality, as an architectural creation, as a political setting for both the promise and peril of democracy, and as a mythic backdrop for fictive struggles of identity formation and personal liberation. This course will begin a student's exploration of American culture and politics, with St. Louis serving as field laboratory for investigations that will also present the lives of New York, Chicago, New Orleans, Philadelphia and other cities. American cities carry material evidence of the economic and political reasons that they exist, the transportation networks that shape them, the street plans that give them form, the governments that provide the public good, the people who call them home, the role of public transportation systems, the geography of racial segregation, and the histories of immigrant communities. At the same time, the role of the American city has changed significantly in the 21st century when most Americans now live in suburbs surrounding older cities. Throughout the semester, this course will analyze the material and social culture of American cities through a series of lectures, films and field trips.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MTWRF 3:00-4:45

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Fieldwork with supplement

Register via WebStac

L98-479 section 09: The Broadway Musical: Performing and Mapping Race and Gender on the New York Stage and Street

Semester

SU2019

Section

09

Instructor

Decker

Description

At the center of Manhattan sits Times Square, an entertainment district located at the primary interchange of New York City's subway system and centered on a cluster of theatres, virtually all built before the stock market crash of 1929. This group of buildings-known together as Broadway theatres-make up a singularly enduring element of the architectural fabric of American popular culture. The musicals staged in these theatres over the last century-and life on the streets surrounding them-have hosted ever changing and stubbornly stereotypical performances of race and gender. This travel course delves into the history of Times Square, the Broadway theatres, and the Broadway musical-considering the changing nature of street and stage across the twentieth and twenty-first centuries and paying close attention to race and gender. Creative interchange with other Manhattan neighborhoods proves essential to the story, and so the course embraces neighborhoods such as Harlem, the African American district uptown that was created in large part by the development of Times Square, and downtown areas, such as Greenwich Village and the Lower East Side, which fostered upstart and ethnic music and theatre. This sixteen-day On Location travel course includes two weeks in Manhattan course and offers a unique and immersive form of location-based cultural study that draws upon multiple disciplinary models and methods. We will go on guided group and solo walking tours, visit theaters and archives, pursue independent research, meet local experts and theatre professionals, and go to at least four Broadway musicals. Coursework will combine digital research and research tools with group and independent archival research in New York City libraries. Participants will also attend a performance of "Waitress" at the Fox Theatre in St. Louis in the Spring prior to the course. This course will be of particular interest to students in Performing Arts, Music, Urban Studies, History, African and African American Studies, and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies-all of which fall under the broad umbrella of American Culture Studies. Graduate students and advanced undergraduates are welcome. Interested Individuals will need to complete an application and submit it by January 15, 2019. Graduate level students (M.A. and Ph.D) will receive tuition remission; Financial Assistance is available for those undergraduate students who qualify. For tuition costs, application details, and more information, please see https://pages.wustl.edu/onlocation

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

MTWRF 9:00-5:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Popular Culture
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK
MD

Register via WebStac

U89-484 section 31: Machines and Monsters: Imagining Technology in Mid Century American Culture

Semester

SU2019

Section

31

Instructor

Walsh

Description

This class examines the history of the social relationship to technology in the context of the post-war computational machines, ENIAC and UNIVAC, the "electronic brains" of the new digital era. Using a multidisciplinary approach that incorporates history, technology studies, communication studies, and visual and material culture studies, it traces themes of optimism/anxiety, utopia/dystopia through a variety of primary documents. It also analyzes a variety of responses-to computers, to technology in general, to the politics and militarism of the Cold War-that mark this moment as particularly important for thinking about today's techno-culture. By the end of the semester, students will understand the general history of the computer and, more broadly, the complex interplay of culture and technology. They will also be prepared to critically evaluate current and emerging issues related to technology, data, privacy, social power, and labor. This course fulfills the Humanities distribution requirement for the AMCS MA program. The course may also count towards the Undergraduate Major or Minor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-R- 6:00-8:45

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac