course listings, FL2018

Undergraduate Courses

Every semester, AMCS posts our home-based and cross-listed courses on a custom webpage where students can sort courses by level, concentration, designation, and instructor. These are the same courses as listed in WebStac, but with information specific to the major and minor, like concentration area and requirement. Select from the nav bar below to review the list for the upcoming semester.

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  • FL2018

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L98-1012 section 01: Introduction to Urban Studies

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Carol Camp Yeakey

Description

This course provides a survey of the field of Urban Studies, utilizing the city of St. Louis as a field site. The major purpose of the course is to gradually reveal how a city operates internally, and how it operates externally with its sister cities, surrounding metropolitan areas and neighboring states, amidst competing and often contradictory interests. Utilizing historical analysis as a guide, the course will briefly revisit the experiences of previous waves of ethnic groups to the St. Louis metropolitan area, as a lens for understanding the current social, political and economic dilemmas which many urban dwellers in St. Louis now face. The course will reveal to students the intricacies of social welfare issues and policies among high density populations, in St. Louis, that are homogeneous and heterogeneous, at the same time. Visits and discussions with various governmental and nongovernmental agencies, and how such agencies function or dysfunction for various constituencies allow students to ask crucial questions regarding equality of opportunity in a democratic society. Students will also encounter diverse communities and neighborhoods and the intended and unintended consequences of social welfare policies designed to ameliorate urban dilemmas such as poverty and inequality, homelessness, educational underachievement, gentrification, migration and immigration, development, health care, fiscal issues, the informal economy, and issues concerned with crime and social justice, among others. Readings are reinforced and challenged through visits, interactions and observations with broad constituencies and institutions, ranging from city officials to community residents. As such, this course offers a survey discussion of the rich interdisciplinary field of Urban Studies for those who may be interested in pursuing a stand alone major in the field of Urban Studies.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 2:00-4:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L18 101

Register via WebStac

L98-101B section 01: American Politics

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Andrew Reeves

Description

This course provides an overview of the politics of the American system of government. Among the topics to be covered are the historical developments of American politics, ferderalism, political participation (voting, interest groups, parties), institutions (congress, the courts, the president), and public opinion. A theme underlying our examination of these and other topics will be the fact that political actors are purposive in their strategic pursuit of various objectives. We will explore the many ways in which this aspect of political behavior impacts institutions and the interactions between political actors throughout the American political system.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

L32 101B

Register via WebStac

L98-122 section 01: A&S Freshman Seminar - A Sense of Place: Discovering the Environment of St. Louis

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Frances Martin

Description

Go exploring in and around St Louis. You'll learn about the St. Louis backyard, and your 'home' for the next four years. Through field trips, readings, and discussion, you'll see first-hand what challenges face the environment and the people who live here. You will learn how to examine multiple perspectives, how to think critically and how to approach problems from an interdisciplinary and holistic approach. You'll also learn why it is important to know a community at the local level if you're going to affect change on any level-state, national, or international. In addition to weekly readings and discussion, this class includes several field trips.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

---T--- 1:00-4:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L82 122

Register via WebStac

L98-126 section 01: Freshman Seminar: Law and Society

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Mark Smith

Description

This course considers the basic aspects of the American legal system: its foundations, processes, institutions and rights. We will also study some specific substantive areas of the law. The course consists of two 1-1/2 hour Socratic lectures per week. Upon completion of this course, you should have a basic knowledge of the American legal system, an important part of a general education. My hope is that such knowledge will enable you to better understand and assess current legal events. I also hope that you, if you have not already done so, develop an interest in those events. Further, this course should enable you to consider law as a future area of study and career. Interested students may continue their study in the spring semester with an optional one-credit seminar focusing on contemporary Supreme Court cases. Open only to freshman.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

L43 126

Register via WebStac

L98-160 section 01: First Year Seminar: Easy Riders, Migrant Laborers: Mobility in Literature and Film

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Long Le-Khac

Description

The open road-a quintessential American image. This seminar explores the stories of open space, social mobility, and renewed possibilities that pervade American literature, film, and culture. What accounts for the pull of the open road? What roles have these stories played in American identity? We'll pursue and complicate ideas of mobility, examining how differences of class, race, gender, and national origin shape them. Within national narratives of movement, how might we reconcile the coexistence of easy riders and migrant laborers, overseas adventurers and displaced refugees? Our journey will begin with the westward expansion of the 19th century and take us through the rise of the highway, mass immigration, and American global power that reshaped ideas of mobility in the 20th and 21st centuries. Our routes will range widely, following the American "frontier" as it expands beyond the continental U.S. into the Pacific and the world. Authors/directors may include Walt Whitman, Bharati Mukherjee, Jack Kerouac, Tomás Rivera, Dennis Hopper, Cormac McCarthy, and Myung Mi Kim.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

ENGLISH LITERATURE L98 160

Register via WebStac

L98-163 section 01: Freedom, Citizenship, and the Making of American Culture

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Peter Kastor

Description

This course offers a broad survey of American history from the era before European settlement of North America to the late twentieth century. The course explores the emergence and geographic expansion of the United States and addresses changes in what it meant to be an American during the nation's history. Tracing major changes in the nation's economic structures, politics, social order and culture, the course chronicles, among other issues, changes in the meanings of freedom, citizenship, and American identity. Introductory course to the major and minor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 9:00-10:00

Concentration Areas

Early America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

INTRO

Same As

L22 163

Register via WebStac

L98-2010 section 01: Religion and American Society

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

R. Griffith

Description

This course explores religious life in the United States. We will focus our study on groups and movements that highlight distinctive ways of being both 'religious' and 'American,' including the Americanization of global religions in the US context. Major themes will include religious encounter and conflict; secularization, resurgent traditionalism, and new religious establishments; experimentalism, eclecticism, and so-called 'spiritual' countercultures; the relationship between religious change and broader social and political currents (including clashes over race, class, gender, and sexuality); and the challenges of religious multiplicity in the US. You will: 1) acquire knowledge of the disparate religions practiced in North America during the twentieth century and beyond; 2) examine some of the chief conflicts as well as alliances between religion and the American social order in a global context; and 3) develop interpretive tools for understanding religions present and enduring role in the US and the world.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

L57 201

Register via WebStac

L98-2011 section 01: Understanding Racial Inequality in the Contemporary U.S.

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Jake Rosenfeld

Description

Overview of sociological understandings of race, with a particular focus on race relations in the contemporary United States.? We begin by investigating how sociologists understand racial distinctions, asking: What comprises a racial group?? What constitutes a 'group' in the social sense?? We then shift our attention to patterns of racial inequality in the U.S., investigating the intersection of economic, political, and racial stratification.? After analyzing national trends in racial stratification, we narrow the focus to particular regions and metropolitan areas, including St. Louis, to shed light on pressing public concerns such as the interrelationships between race and the criminal justice system.? The course ends by looking beyond U.S. borders to compare the way that race is understood in other countries.? Are there common patterns of racial classification shared by many societies? What makes the U.S. system of racial stratification distinctive? No prerequisites.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L40 2010

Register via WebStac

L98-202 section 01: The Immigrant Experience

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Alfred Darnell

Description

This course explores the history and politics of immigrant groups in the nineteenth and twentieth century United States. Topics include legislation, patterns of migration, comparisons of different waves of immigration, and changing social attitudes. This course is a core requirement for the ethnic studies concentration in American Culture Studies.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Register via WebStac

L98-2033 section 01: Introduction to Education: Contradictions and Controversies in School Choice

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

TBA

Description

Drawing from social scientific perspectives, this course surveys educational research and policy in contemporary U.S. society. It considers the relationship among controversial policy issues (e.g., school choice, public school closure, urban redevelopment) and education. Finally, it examines the implications of recent changes in education for social inequality, mobility, and group relations.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

Education L98 203A

Register via WebStac

L98-206 section 01: "Reading" Culture: The Visible and the Invisible: Introduction to American Visual Culture Studeis

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Phillip Maciak

Description

The poor are the "unseen" multitudes, the Ku Klux Klan is the "Invisible Empire," W.E.B. Du Bois's African American culture exists "behind the veil," gay men and women come in and out of "the closet," terrorists lie hidden in "sleeper cells"-these are just a few of the common visual metaphors used to describe the complex forces and subjects that make up U.S. culture.  Despite its status as metaphor, however, visuality shapes our relationship to American society in very real ways. To become visible in the eyes of the state is to access citizenship, to become a full member of the social world. In this course, we will encounter a variety of cultural texts that figure identity through visibility. From narratives of haunting in U.S. culture to spectacular displays of national identity and accounts of minority groups insisting on the right to be seen, we will look to the moments in American culture when the question of visibility has been most crucial.  The course is arranged thematically and will feature both primary texts as well as classic and contemporary work in the field of American Studies. Possible topics include: the theory and practice of Holy Land tourism in the nineteenth century; antebellum hoax culture; the relationship between lynching and mass media; documentary accounts of natural disasters from the San Francisco earthquake to Hurricane Katrina; queer representation in popular media; the rise and fall of the Vine app; the rhetoric of terrorist "sleeper cells"; oppositional mythologies of the "white working class" and "undocumented" immigrants. The semester will culminate with a discussion of the globalization of American Studies alongside a serial viewing of the first season of the acclaimed drama series, Homeland (2011).

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Register via WebStac

L98-2061 section 01: Sophomore Seminar: The "Trump Era": A history of the present

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Friedman

Description

The election of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States has exposed and exacerbated deep divisions within, and visions for, the nation. In this discussion-based class, we will seek to understand these tumultuous times by examining the twentieth-century struggles over meaning and power upon which they rest. Our readings of contemporary analyses of the "Trump era" will be coupled with case studies that explore the deeper history of some of the most important issues at stake. Probable topics include immigration and its restriction; movements for racial justice and racial supremacy; sexual harassment/assault and gender inequality in politics; capitalism, regulation, and the welfare state; national security from the Cold War to post-9/11.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

History L98 2061

Register via WebStac

L98-220 section 01: Topics in AMCS: Whose St. Louis? Religion, Race, and Power in the Gateway City

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Christine Croxall

Description

Throughout the city’s history, St. Louis residents and their leaders have established laws, policies, and practices that have privileged certain groups at the expense of others. Race has often been part of that equation. This course examines moments of social crisis in St. Louis history—up to the present day—when residents have mobilized, resisted, or ignored efforts to address race-based inequalities. We consider how St. Louis’s religious communities in particular have understood the city’s racial codes and how they have positioned themselves in relation to movements for social change. Along the way we explore slavery, property and housing restrictions, interstate construction, hiring practices, and gun violence. In addition to course reading assignments and film screenings, students will visit at least three religious sites and one museum to encounter and analyze the intersections of race, religion, and power in St. Louis.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-245 section 01: Images of Disability in Film and Literature

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Kathleen Kniepmann

Description

This course will critically examine the portrayal of persons with disabilities in literature and film, exploring how those images either shape or mimic general public impressions. We will discuss the implications of messages from the media on American responses to people with disabilities, as well as formulating strategies for promoting positive, inclusive messages. Perspectives from social science, health care, communications and other fields will provide frameworks for analysis. Literature will include fiction, biography and autobiography in books, essays, drama, poetry and short stories. Selections from fictional, educational, and documentary films will be reviewed during the semester. We will also investigate images in newspapers, magazines and advertising.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Social Thought & Social Problems
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Same As

L43 249

Register via WebStac

L98-248 section 01: Latino/a Experiences in the United States

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

TBA

Description

This multidisciplinary freshman seminar introduces Annika Rodriguez Scholars to the field of Latino/a Studies in order to better understand the place of Latinos in U.S. politics, history, and culture. Students are asked to examine how a heterogeneous and changing Latino/a population both shapes and is shaped by life in the United States. A selection of texts from various disciplines (including history, the social sciences, music, literature, and the arts) inform our class discussions. Over the course of the semester, we also engage with scholarly conversations about constructions of "Latinidad" as they relate to questions of identity, class, race/ethnicity, religion, gender, im(migration), language, and popular culture. Students learn to recognize and appreciate the complexities of Latino/a experiences in the United States and will become familiar with a critical vocabulary that facilitates complex discussions about broader issues of American culture and identity.
Prerequisite: Freshmen members of the Annika Rodriguez Scholars Program. Students will be waitlisted and then manually added to course.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-252A section 01: Sophomore Seminar: Artists and Crisis

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

McGinley

Description

What is the artist's responsibility to society? Should social and political concerns constrain or shape the work of the artist? What about when that artist is a member of an oppressed group? What about during a moment of historic, cultural, or planetary crisis? Can we separate the work of art from the (perhaps reprehensible) behaviors or views of the artist? What role does art's solicitation of emotion play in stimulating compassion and moral action? As art moves closer to activism, what standards of judgment should we apply?

These are big questions and have been explored by philosophers, artists, and cultural critics across the globe. Many of them have been recently revived by contemporary social movements, including #MeToo, Black Lives Matter, and Occupy Wall Street. While this course examines these questions in artistic sites ranging from ancient Greek tragedy to 1920s Harlem poetry to 1980s feminist art, we will have ample opportunity to link our historical study to present-day concerns. Theatre, performance, literature, film, music, and dance will be explored. By looking at artistic works as well as the ethical and cultural debates that surround their creation, we will think together about artistic and civic responsibility, aesthetics, ethics, and tactics for social change. No artistic experience is required. Sophomores given priority.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Register via WebStac

L98-2674 section 01: Sophomore Seminar: Slavery and Memory in American Popular Culture

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Sowande' Mustakeem

Description

Sophomores receive priority registration. The history of slavery has long created a sense of unease within the consciousness of many Americans. Recognizing this continued reality, this seminar examines how slavery is both remembered and silenced within contemporary popular culture. Although slavery scholarship continues to expand, how do everyday Americans gain access to the history of bondage? Taking an interdisciplinary approach to these intriguing queries, we will examine a range of sources: literature, public history, art/poetry, visual culture, movies and documentaries, as well as contemporary music including reggae and hip hop. The centerpiece of this course covers North American society, however, in order to offer a critical point of contrast students will be challenged to explore the varied ways slavery is commemorated in others parts of the African Diaspora.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

INTRO
MD

Same As

L22 2674

Register via WebStac

L98-297 section 01: Undergraduate Internship in American Culture Studies

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Heidi Kolk

Description

Students receive credit for a faculty-directed and approved internship. Registration requires completion of the Learning Agreement which the student obtains from the Career Center and which must be filled out and signed by the Career Center and the faculty sponsor prior to beginning internship work. Credit should correspond to actual time spent in work activities, e.g., 8-10 hours a week for thireen or fourteen weeks to receive 3 units of credit; 1 or 2 credits for fewer hours. Students may not receive credit for work done for pay but are encouraged to obtain written evaluations about such work for the student's academic advisor and career placement file.Permission of department required before enrollment. Only AMCS Majors and Minors may enroll for L98 297.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-298 section 01: Directed Fieldwork in American Culture Studies

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Heidi Kolk

Description

Fieldwork under the direction of an AMCS-affiliated faculty. All proposals for study must be submitted for review and approved by the AMCS advisor. See the AMCS website for the appropriate form. By permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-299 section 01: The Study of Cities and Metropolitan America

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Carol Camp Yeakey

Description

This course serves as the introductory course analyzing the forces shaping America's cities and surrounding metropolitan areas. It examines as well strategies for dealing with many of the profound social issues affecting urban/metropolitan America. Emanating from an historical perspective, it examines the ways in which industrialization and deindustrialization shaped Northern American cities and the consequences of deindustrialization on urban citizenry. It further surveys the demographic and spatial transformation of American cities examining the consequences of urban transformation on federal, state and local politics, on society and on her institutions. Similarly, the course focuses on the origin and societal changes and emerging goals of urban development, gentrification and evolving patterns of metropolitanism and the necessity for central city as well as neighborhood reconstruction. The dynamics of racial residential segregation, crime and punishment, issues of academic achievement and under-achievement, the social cleavages of urban marginalized communities, family structure, urban homelessness, urban sprawl, and health care, among others, are viewed from the perspective of social justice by exploring social, political, economic, racial, and ethnic factors that impact on access, equity and care. Various theoretical perspectives and philosophies are introduced that have dominated the discourse on race and urban poverty. A field based component complements the coursework, and is designed to build interest, awareness and skills in preparation for outreach to urban communities. PREREQUISITE: Sophomore standing.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T----- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L18 299

Register via WebStac

L98-3000 section 01: Overseas Research in American Culture Studies

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Heidi Kolk

Description

Overseas research under the direction of an AMCS-affiliated faculty. All proposals for study must be submitted for review and approved by the AMCS advisor. See the AMCS website for the appropriate form. By permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-3002 section 01: Directed Study in Legal Culture

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Heidi Kolk

Description

Directed study with an AMCS-affiliated faculty. All proposals for study must be submitted for review and approved by the AMCS advisor. See the AMCS website for the appropriate form. By permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-3006 section 01: Local Archives: Directed Study in St. Louis

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Heidi Kolk

Description

Directed study with an AMCS-affiliated faculty. All proposals for study must be submitted for review and approved by the AMCS advisor. See the AMCS website for the appropriate form. By permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-3014 section 01: American Popular Music and Media

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

TBA

Description

This course considers the history of American popular music as delivered by successive mass media platforms in the industrial and post-industrial eras: from mass-produced sheet music in the mid nineteenth century to digital music and video on the internet. Historical contextualization and in depth analysis of musical scores and various kinds of audio recordings and audiovisual texts will be at the center of the course. Topics to be considered include: the history of sound recording technologies and formats; the role of electronic mass media structures (radio, film, television, the internet); urbanization, national commercial music centers (New York, Hollywood, Nashville), and the importance of regional sounds in a national context; the formation and transformation of select genres (rock, country, various black musics); legal frameworks relating to music as a commodity (copyright, sampling); the impact of visual media on music dissemination, performance, and meanings; and how recorded media of all kinds have transformed the act of listening. Issues of race, gender, sexuality, personal, and national identity will be considered across the course.
Prerequisites: Music 121C or Music 121J or permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

Music L98 3015

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 01: The American School

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Michelle Purdy

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers, changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family, policy issues that have shaped the development of schooling in America. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L12 301C

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 02: The American School

Semester

FL2018

Section

02

Instructor

Madonna Riesenmy

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers, changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family, policy issues that have shaped the development of schooling in America. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L12 301C

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 03: The American School

Semester

FL2018

Section

03

Instructor

Rowhea Elmesky

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers, changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family, policy issues that have shaped the development of schooling in America. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L12 301C

Register via WebStac

L98-301C section 04: The American School

Semester

FL2018

Section

04

Instructor

Rowhea Elmesky

Description

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers, changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family, policy issues that have shaped the development of schooling in America. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L12 301C

Register via WebStac

L98-3028 section 01: Music of the 1960's

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Patrick Burke

Description

The music of the 1960s played a significant and widely noted role in an era of global political and social upheaval. This course surveys a broad range of music produced during the decade, spanning the world but with emphasis on Anglo-American popular music. While a music course traditionally deals with a single genre such as 'world music,' classical, or jazz, this course will analyze several genres together to show how each influenced the others and how all were informed by broader social and cultural concerns. The course thus will both familiarize students with diverse musical traditions and introduce them to a new way of thinking about music and culture. Topics to be discussed include the transnational music industry; the contested concept of 'folk' and 'traditional' music; music and political protest; music and migration; and music's relation to ethnic and class identity.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture

Program Attributes

Same As

L27 3028

Register via WebStac

L98-3034 section 01: Race and Ethnicity in American Politics

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Alfred Darnell

Description

This seminar will discuss the continuing importance of race and ethnicity in American politics and the politics of racial minority groups in America. It will examine the disadvantage minorites have in the American political structure including problems with political participation. It will examine how the structure and functions of the brances of government and its bureaucracy affect the aspirations of minorities. The roll of pressure groups on political structure will be discussed. Additional discussion will focus on urban politics and tensions.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L32 3031

Register via WebStac

A46-307X section 01: Community Building

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Hansman

Description

(see WU course listing for time) This course looks at the intersection of the built fabric and the social fabric. Using St. Louis as the starting point, this course takes students out of the classroom and into a variety of neighborhoods--old, new, affluent, poor--to look at the built environment in a variety of contexts and through a variety of lenses. Almost every week for the first half of the semester, students visit a different area (or areas), each trip highlighting some theme or issue related to the built environment (architecture, planning, American history, investment and disinvestment, community character and values, race, transportation, immigrant communities, future visions, etc.). Running parallel to this, students are involved in an ongoing relationship with one particular struggling neighborhood, in which students attend community meetings and get to know and become involved with the people in the community in a variety of ways. Students learn to look below the surface, beyond the single obvious story, for multiple stories, discovering their complexity, contradictions and paradoxes. They also come to consider the complex ways in which architecture and the built environment can affect or be affected by a host of other disciplines. College of Architecture and College of Art sophomores, juniors, and seniors have priority. Fulfills Sam Fox Commons requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Same As

Architecture A46 307X

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L98-3081 section 01: City on a Hill: The Concept and Culture of American Exceptionalism

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Abram Van Engen

Description

This course examines the concept, history, and culture of American exceptionalism-the idea that America has been specially chosen, or has a special mission to the world. First, we examine the Puritan sermon that politicians quote when they describe America as a 'city on a hill.' This sermon has been called the 'ur-text' of American literature, the foundational document of American culture; learning and drawing from multiple literary methodologies, we will re-investigate what that sermon means and how it came to tell a story about the Puritan origins of American culture-a thesis our class will reassess with the help of modern critics. In the second part of this class, we will broaden our discussion to consider the wider (and newer) meanings of American exceptionalism, theorizing the concept while looking at the way it has been revitalized, redefined and redeployed in recent years. Finally, the course ends with a careful study of American exceptionalism in modern political rhetoric, starting with JFK and proceeding through Reagan to the current day, ending with an analysis of Donald Trump and the rise of 'America First.' In the end, students will gain a firm grasp of the long history and continuing significance-the pervasive impact-of this concept in American culture.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Early America

Program Attributes

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L98-3085 section 01: Topics in Visual, Material, and Digital Culture: Computers, Data, and the Anxieties of Technology

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

David Walsh

Description

What are the preoccupying concerns about technology today? Net neutrality? Malware? Energy infrastructure? Social media? Automation? AI and killer robots? Should we be anxious about any of these topics? Who decides? Are we autonomous agents of concern, deciding for ourselves when to spend our emotional energy, or are we informed (programmed?) to be anxious by a variety of cultural influences such as entertainment, journalism, or education? Can't we just love our phones and not worry about the rest?


In this class we'll consider these questions as cultural responses concerning technology: translation activities that participate in the complicated process of bringing technological objects and systems from the sometimes obscure inventive practices of engineering and capitalism into the broader cultural imagination; that is, translating the technological from the vernacular of specialists to that of 'everyday folk.' We'll seek to understand the cost associated with such translation practices by situating our focus on the emergence of the new computational machines, ENIAC and UNIVAC, the 'electronic brains,' built in the period after the second world war. We'll investigate the intellectual history of computational machinery and digital electronics, and take a long look at the political, military, and economic contexts girding their invention and production. We'll discover the variety of responses--to computing technology, to the Cold War, to postwar suburbanization--that mark this moment as particularly important for thinking about today's techno-culture.


The framework of our investigations will come from history, philosophy, technology studies, communication studies, and visual and material culture studies. This multidisciplinary approach will help us answer fundamentally important first questions: what do we mean by 'technology,' and how do we study it? Does it possess its own historical and social power? Is it always (ever?) neutral? Our efforts will illuminate structures of social and political power that operate beneath the veneer of 'technology,' and we'll be prepared to answer the urgent and important question: who owns the technological?

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

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L98-3121 section 01: Topics in American Literature: Girls' Fiction

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Amy Pawl

Description

Little Goody Two Shoes taught morality and the alphabet to the poor children of her village and eventually rode in a coach and six; Nancy Drew drove a blue roadster (later a convertible and still later a hybrid) while solving crimes and bringing justice to the town of River Heights. Between these two landmark characters lie the two and a half centuries of rich and diverse fiction for girls that will be at the center of this writing-intensive course. After grounding our studies by reading selected works from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, we will concentrate on twentieth-century productions, beginning with the surprisingly progressive serial fiction produced by the Stratemeyer Syndicate and others in the early 1900s. (Titles such as The Motor Girls, The Moving Picture Girls, and The Outdoor Girls advertise the series´ departure from domestic settings.) Throughout our study of both popular and classic texts, we will investigate the social, political and familial roles for girls that the texts imagine. Major genres will include mysteries, frontier fiction, career fiction, domestic fiction, school stories, and fantasy. Authors will include Newbery, Alcott, Montgomery, Wilder, Lindgren, L'Engle, and "Carolyn Keene."  Writing Intensive. Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture

Program Attributes

Same As

ENGLISH LITERATURE L98 3121

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L98-3121 section 02: Topics in American Literature: Girls' Fiction

Semester

FL2018

Section

02

Instructor

Amy Pawl

Description

Little Goody Two Shoes taught morality and the alphabet to the poor children of her village and eventually rode in a coach and six; Nancy Drew drove a blue roadster (later a convertible and still later a hybrid) while solving crimes and bringing justice to the town of River Heights. Between these two landmark characters lie the two and a half centuries of rich and diverse fiction for girls that will be at the center of this writing-intensive course. After grounding our studies by reading selected works from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, we will concentrate on twentieth-century productions, beginning with the surprisingly progressive serial fiction produced by the Stratemeyer Syndicate and others in the early 1900s. (Titles such as The Motor Girls, The Moving Picture Girls, and The Outdoor Girls advertise the series´ departure from domestic settings.) Throughout our study of both popular and classic texts, we will investigate the social, political and familial roles for girls that the texts imagine. Major genres will include mysteries, frontier fiction, career fiction, domestic fiction, school stories, and fantasy. Authors will include Newbery, Alcott, Montgomery, Wilder, Lindgren, L'Engle, and "Carolyn Keene."  Writing Intensive. Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

ENGLISH LITERATURE L98 3121

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L98-312A section 01: Introduction to Digital Humanities: Cultural Analysis in the Information Age

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Anupam Basu

Description

It is a truism that computers have changed our lives and the way we think and interact. But in fact systematic efforts to apply current technologies to the study of history and culture have been rare. This course will enable students to consider how these technologies might transform the humanities. We will explore the various ways in which ideas and data in the humanities can be represented, analyzed, and communicated. We will also reflect on how the expansion of information technology has transformed and is continuing to transform the humanities, both with regard to their role in the university and in society at large. Readings and classwork will be supplemented by class presentations and a small assigned group project.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

INTERDISCIPLINARY PROJECT IN THE HUMANITIES L98 312A

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L98-312W section 01: Topics in English and American Literature: End of the Century: American Culture During the 1990s

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Matthew Shipe

Description

Starting with Allan Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind," a book that helped re-ignite the Culture Wars, this course will consider the debates and problems that pervaded American culture during the 1990s. From the end of the Cold War to the sexual scandals that rocked Bill Clinton's presidency, from the emergence of the Internet to the rise of grunge and rap, the 1990s were a time of vast change in American culture. It was period when we, as a nation, reconsidered the legacy of the 1960s, the Reagan revolution, and the end of the Cold War, a time of economic expansion and cultural tension. In our consideration of this period, we will take a multidisciplinary approach when tackling a variety of materials-ranging from literary fiction (Philip Roth's "The Human Stain," Jonathan Franzen's "The Corrections") and popular films (Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing" and The Cohen brothers' "The Big Lebowski") to personal memoir and the music of Nirvana and Public Enemy-in an attempt to come to a better understanding of our recent history. Throughout the semester, we will pursue the vexed cultural, political, and historical questions that Americans faced in the years between the fall of the Berlin Wall and the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001, and consider how literary texts imagined this period of American history. Other possible texts include David Foster Wallace's "A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again," Joan Didion's "Political Fictions," Toni Morrison's "Paradise," John Updike's "Rabbit at Rest," and Elizabeth Wurtzel's "Prozac Nation." Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

ENGLISH LITERATURE L98 312W

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L98-3130 section 01: Education, Childhood, Adolescence, and Society

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Madonna Riesenmy

Description

An examination of childhood, child development, and education from different perspectives. Observation of children in a variety of settings, including classrooms. Through historical, sociological, psychological and political readings, students will clarify current ideas about children, investigate the nature of childhood, and begin to understand how and why childhood is constructed as it is. PREREQUISITE: SOPHOMORE STANDING. Limited to 45 students.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L12 313B

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L98-3130 section 02: Education, Childhood, Adolescence, and Society

Semester

FL2018

Section

02

Instructor

Madonna Riesenmy

Description

An examination of childhood, child development, and education from different perspectives. Observation of children in a variety of settings, including classrooms. Through historical, sociological, psychological and political readings, students will clarify current ideas about children, investigate the nature of childhood, and begin to understand how and why childhood is constructed as it is. PREREQUISITE: SOPHOMORE STANDING. Limited to 45 students.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

L12 313B

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L98-3132 section 01: Topics in Composition: Writing and the Law

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Victoria Thomas

Description

Most legal practice consists not of fine oratory but rather of great writing. However, it is not only lawyers who need to be able to incorporate the law into their professional practice: in this course, we will look at the many different types of writing in and about the law to see how the principles of rhetoric must be used to persuade in different ways depending on the writer's purpose. We will learn the skills necessary to adapt the framing of our writing to its audience as we think about how we might persuade a judge, a lay client, a community, a committee or other professionals. We will consider the psychological effects of our writing and how we seek to persuade our readers not only with the strength of our reasoning but with the power of our emotional appeal to their particular interests. We will learn how to think and write about the law in a range of circumstances as assignments cover writing for business about implications of laws, reporting about a law for the popular press, investigating a legal issue and explaining a law's ramifications as well as attempting to encourage support for a particular law; this is not, however, a technical legal writing course. Readings will be drawn from statutes and judgments but more commonly from academic, business and popular examples of writing on the interpretation of laws governing topical concerns. Issues to be dealt with may include the extent of police/citizens' rights to protect themselves (so-called Stand Your Ground laws); rights to refuse medical treatment (Cruzan v Director, Missouri Dept of Health); religious groups' rights to discriminate (The Religious Freedom Restoration Act); Open Carry laws (St. Louis Zoo v Smith); immigration proposals such as The Dream Act; reform of mandatory prison sentences.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

WRITING L98 3132

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L98-315A section 01: Topics in American Literature: Popular Music and American Literature from Rag to Rap

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

William Maxwell

Description

This course explores what happens when the expressive energy of black-authored genres of American popular music--ragtime, blues, jazz, rock, and rap--spills over into modern and contemporary American literature. Why did ragtime come to symbolize interracial and international mixture in the early 20th-century American novel, and how did jazz--and the slogan of the "Jazz Age"--grow to signify the national distinctiveness of American modernism? How did rock help to steer the postmodern turn, and why is rap now canonizing itself as an academic poetry through thick anthologies and footnote-heavy artist memoirs? How has American writing's long-running commentary on popular music affected that music's history and mythology--and vice versa? Writers (and writer-musicians) to be studied include James Weldon Johnson, F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, Langston Hughes, Louis Armstrong, Gwendolyn Bennett, Jack Kerouac, Ralph Ellison, Frank O'Hara, Rita Dove, Bob Dylan, Don DeLillo, Patti Smith, Richard Hell, and Jay-Z. Musical or musicological experience is welcome, but truly not required. Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

ENGLISH LITERATURE L98 315A

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L98-3161 section 01: Topics in English and American Lit: Literature and Photography

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Maciak

Description

Literature relies on visualization, the conjuring of images of the world in our mind's eye; photography is a technology that renders those visualizations seemingly real. They are competing technologies, alternative ways of seeing, so what happens when these two technologies of imagination and vision collide? This course will examine the dynamic, collaborative relationship between literature and photography, from the writers grappling with this new medium in the middle of the nineteenth century to contemporary authors entranced by the ghostliness of the digital image. We will be especially interested in literary texts with embedded photographs-words surrounding images, pictures challenging the descriptive power of language. Writers may include Walt Whitman, Frederick Douglass, Langston Hughes, John Dos Passos, Eudora Welty, James Agee, James Baldwin, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, W.G. Sebald, Teju Cole, Valeria Luiselli, and Claudia Rankine. Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

English Lit L98 3161

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L98-3162 section 01: Topics in Literature: American Fiction from World War II to Today

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Long Le-Khac

Description

This course surveys the explosion of voices and styles that is American fiction since World War II. This literature pours out of a period when the borders of the nation became unfixed and new voices entered American letters. The glorious mess that resulted cannot be contained within any single literary history. Our goal: to map the divergent stories of postwar American fiction. We'll examine how historical forces-the Cold War, Civil Rights movements, and media transformations-shaped this literature. We'll explore how fiction stretched to describe new vistas-the highway, the suburb, the linked globe-and gave voice to diverse groups struggling for inclusion. But we'll also attend to how American literature followed its own aesthetic, humanist, and even posthumanist concerns. What happens to the individual in a postmodern world? What are the limits of fiction? Does literature have a role in the world or is it a world unto itself? But it's not all weighty questions. We'll also delight in the playful mixing of genres from metafiction to comic books that characterize this period. Authors include Ralph Ellison, Vladimir Nabokov, Maxine Hong Kingston, Marilynne Robinson, David Foster Wallace, and Junot Díaz. Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture

Program Attributes

Same As

ENGLISH LITERATURE L98 3162

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L98-316F section 01: Rediscovering the Child: Interdisciplinary Workshops in an Urban Middle School

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

R Lorberbaum

Description

It is said that at this time in history the entire country must make a commitment to improve the positive possibilities of education. We must work to lift people who are underserved; we must expand the range of abilities for those who are caught in only one kind of training; and we must each learn to be creative thinkers contributing our abilities to many sectors of our society. In this course, we expand our views about learning by experimenting with the creative process of lateral thinking. In the first six weeks of the semester, we learn about learning by meeting with exceptional people with many scholarly, professional, and civic engagement accomplishments. We also learn by working in teams to develop an exciting set of 2-D / 3-D, hands-on, problem-solving workshops for middle-schoolers from economically disadvantaged urban families; the workshop curriculum will be based upon your knowledge and passion as well as your interests. During the last eight weeks, we deliver these workshops once a week to students at Compton-Drew Middle School (adjacent to the Science Center in the city of St. Louis). In this course we celebrate the choices of studies we each pursue, and expand our experience by learning from each other's knowledge bases and creativity. The course is open to students from all disciplines, schools, freshmen through seniors, and meets the multidisciplinary Fieldwork requirement for AMCS majors.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

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L98-317S section 01: Service Learning: Documenting the Queer Past in St. Louis

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Andrea Friedman

Description

Around the U.S. and the world, grassroots LGBTQ history projects investigate the queer past as a means of honoring the courage of those who have come before, creating a sense of community today, and understanding the exclusions and divisions that shaped their communities and continue to limit them. In this course, we participate in this national project of history-making by helping to excavate the queer past in the greater St. Louis region. Course readings will focus on the ways that sexual identities and communities in the United States have been shaped by urban settings since the late nineteenth century, with particular attention to the ways that race, class and gender have structured queer spaces and communities. In their community service project, students will work with local LGBTQ groups, including the St. Louis LGBT History Project, to research St. Louis's queer past. Each student will also conduct an oral history interview with an lLGBTQ community member. IMPORTANT NOTE: This is a service-learning class, which means it combines classroom learning with outside work at a community organization. In addition to regular class time, there is a service requirement, which necessitates an additional 3-5 hours a week. Before beginning community service students must complete required training. Prerequisite: Introduction to Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies or Introduction to Queer Studies, or permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

4

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Same As

L77 3173

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L98-3202 section 01: Civic Scholars Program Semester One: Self Awareness, Civic Life, and Citizenship

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

LuAnn Oros

Theresa Kouo

Description

This is the first semester, foundation course for students in the Civic Scholars Program of the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement. This course provides students with a context for examining civic engagement and developing civic leadership skills. Through lectures, guest speakers, readings, excursions, and class discussion, students 1) explore the history and current status of civic engagement; and 2) prepare for the implementation of a civic project the summer between their junior and senior years. Students meet in a structured class to discuss concepts, engage in critical reflection, and develop leadership skills. In addition, students will critically reflect on course content to enrich their learning. This is a two-credit course. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Civic Scholars Program. Civic Scholars courses do not count towards the AMCS Major and Minor.

Credit Hours

2

Weekly Schedule

---T--- 4:00-6:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

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L98-320A section 01: Religious Freedom in America

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

John Inazu

Mark Valeri

Description

This interdisciplinary course, co-taught by a law school professor and an American historian, concerns the intersection of religion, liberty, and law in American culture. It introduces students to the major texts and historical issues concerning religious liberty, using legal history and case law, intellectual and social history, and political philosophy. It will address issues of significant contemporary debate-from the role of religious groups on college campuses to bakers and gay weddings--along with the deep historical background, from English settlement of North America and the making of the Constitution, through the Civil War, to the Cold War and the recent political developments.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:00

Concentration Areas

Early America
Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES L98 320A

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L98-3283 section 01: Introduction to Global Health

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Peter Benson

Description

This course provides a general introduction to the field of public health. It examines the philosophy, history, organization, functions, activities, and results of public health research and practice. Case studies include infectious and chronic diseases, mental health, maternal and reproductive health, food safety and nutrition, environmental health, and global public health. Students are encouraged to look at health issues from a systemic and population level perspective, and to think critically about health systems and problems, especially health disparities and health care delivery to diverse populations. No background in anthropology or public health is required.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-F-- 9:00-10:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L48 3283

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L98-3310 section 01: The New Inequality

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Jake Rosenfeld

Description

Exploration of recent trends of economic inequality in the United States that have reached levels not seen since before the Great Depression. We examine factors that account for the decades-long increase in economic disparities, paying particular attention to patterns in educational attainment, political developments, and the role of technological change. We will also compare recent movements in economic inequality and macroeconomic performance in the U.S. with other advanced industrialized nations. This course has no specific prerequisites but completion of an introductory course in sociology is recommended before enrollment.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L40 3310

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L98-332A section 01: Getting Paid: A Sociological Investigation of Wages and Salaries

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Jake Rosenfeld

Description

A Burger King worker in the U.S. today performs the same duties and requires the same skills as a Burger King worker in Denmark. Yet the Denmark worker earns two-and-a-half times as much. Why? A full-time construction worker in the U.S. today earns $10,000 less per year, adjusted for inflation, than in 1973. Construction work cannot be shipped overseas, so why the decline?What determines our pay? Are we paid fairly? How do we know? This course seeks to answer these questions. We will draw on a range of comparative, historical, and contemporary case studies to explore changes in the ways in which American workers get paid. Key areas of focus include employer strategies to prevent workers from realizing their market value, to the role Wall St. plays in influencing pay, to ongoing efforts to measure and reward individual productivity. The ultimate goal of the course is to upend our taken-for-granted assumptions about pay-setting, and provide students with a richer, more complex understanding of the contemporary world of wage and salary determination.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L40 3320

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L98-3350 section 01: Poverty and the New American City

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

John Robinson

Description

Exploration of structural changes that are transforming the American urban landscape, especially for low-income populations. We begin with a review of classic theories of urban poverty and consider their relevance in the modern context. We then analyze key political, economic, demographic and geographic shifts in how urban poverty is organized and reproduced, including gentrification, immigration, social policy reform and the credit crisis. Special attention will be devoted to exploring the social and political implications of changing urban policy approaches, as well as the 'suburbanization' of poverty. We will conclude by discussing how urban poverty interfaces with broader social structures, including law, markets and the state. Prerequisite: An introductory course in sociology or consent of the instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L40 3350

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L98-336 section 01: Topics in American Culture Studies: Investigating the School-to-Prison Pipeline

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Olivia Marcucci

Description

How are American schools and society structured to push marginalized youth into prisons? How does labeling this phenomenon the 'school-to-prison pipeline' (STPP), as many have done, add to our understanding of it? This course interrogates these central questions. In addition, the course explores what role incarceration and schooling play in the United States, how the American incarceration and schooling systems are organized to reinforce disparate social outcomes, what ideologies and values are endemic to the incarceration and schooling systems in the United States, how the STPP is enacted on a day-to-day basis and on a structural level, what the impact is on students and families, and how stakeholders are seeking to disrupt the STPP. Race, gender, and other social identities will be featured in the course's analysis of the STPP, therefore this course will require a willingness to be self-reflective. This course will be multidisciplinary in nature and will include ethnographies, legal studies writing, sociological texts, and documentaries. This is a reading-intensive class and will require strong commitment to weekly readings. It is suitable for students interested in issues of education, law, social justice, urban studies, and more.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

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L98-3360 section 01: Topics in AMCS: Upon this Rock ('n' Roll): Evangelicals, Pop Music, & Cultural Politics Since 1960

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Kathryn Kinney

Description

Evangelical Christians hold a massive influence on American culture and politics as issue setters, voting blocs, and media producers. Despite their pervasive and powerful presence, defining evangelicals has proven to be a complex and highly contested task. In this course, our route will follow evangelical music as we learn to listen our way to better understanding the motivations, identities, and fractures of one of the most important social and cultural movements of our time. Through encounters with hippie Jesus rockers and fundamentalist anti-rock critics, world-famous gospel artists and mostly forgotten glam rock evangelists, as well as holy hip hop and retuned hymnologists, we map the constellation of evangelical identities and surrounding cultural politics. Drawing our tools from the methodologies of musicology, ethnomusicology, and religious studies, our work will equip us to critically engage with both popular and religious cultures of American society. An ability to read music is not required for participation in this course.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

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L98-337 section 01: Women's Literature: Before Thelma and Louise: American Women's Adventure Stories

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Barbara Baumgartner

Description

American literature is filled with adventurers and adventure stories. Some of the most exciting tales were written by women. Their adventures include Mary Rowlandson's autobiography of her capture by and life with the Indians, E.D.E.N. Southworth's story of a nineteenth-century heroine who rescues imprisoned maidens and fights duels, and Octavia Butler's science fiction account of a twentieth-century black woman who is transported back through time to an antebellum plantation. Until recently, American women authors and their stories were largely dismissed because they were perceived to focus on domestic concerns, which were seen as narrow and trivial. But the works of many women authors are far different from sentimental domestic fiction. In addition to looking closely at the historical and cultural conditions in which the narratives were written, we examine the ways in which these writers conform to and rebel against cultural prescriptions about femininity. Finally, we read some contemporary and current criticism about these works and American women's writing and discuss the politics of canon formation. Tentative Reading List: Mary Rowlandson, The Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682); The Journal of Madam Knight (1704); Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Hope Leslie (1827); E.D.E.N. Southworth, The Hidden Hand (1858); Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937); Octavia Butler, Kindred (1979); Paule Marshall, Praisesong for the Widow (1983). Writing intensive.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture

Program Attributes

Same As

WOMEN, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY STUDIES L98 337

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L98-341 section 01: Understanding the Evidence: Provocative Topics of Contemporary Women's Health and Reproduction

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Gil Gross

Margaret Baum

Description

Contemporary topics of women's health and reproduction are used as vehicles to introduce the student to the world of evidence-based data acquisition. Selected topics span and cross a multitude of contemporary boundaries. Issues evoke moral, ethical, religious, cultural, political and medical foundations of thought. The student is provided introductory detail to each topic and subsequently embark on an independent critical review of current data and opinion to formulate their own said notions. Examples of targeted topics for the upcoming semester include, but are not limited to: Abortion, Human Cloning, Genetics, Elective Cesarean Section, Fetal Surgery, Hormone Replacement, Refusal of Medical Care, Medical Reimbursement, Liability Crisis and Gender Bias of Medical Care.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T----- 6:00-9:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L77 343

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L98-3490 section 01: Media Cultures

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

TBA

Description

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of cultural and media studies.  Through a focus on television and new media, it analyzes current theoretical ideas and debates about culture.  Main topics include the relationship between new technologies and everyday life and popular culture; analysis of media messages and images; how media help construct new identities and mark differences between groups; analysis of the globalization of the production and circulation of media culture; the rise of multimedia cultural industries; and the role of the audience.  Required Screenings:  Mondays @ 4 pm.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

Media and Film L98 3490

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L98-3500 section 01: On Location: Exploring America: Ground Zero

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Heidi Kolk

Description

Last June, the mayor of St. Louis had the Confederate Memorial in Forest Park hauled to a nearby Civil War Museum in the middle of night––apparently to preempt conflict of the sort that has occurred in cities across the nation. What is at stake in such an action? Why do contested sites––not only war monuments, but those associated with other painful episodes in American history (the burned-out Quik-Trip in Ferguson, the Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial, the PULSE night club, the battlefield at Gettysburg, Area 51)––loom so large in the popular imagination? This course considers “ground zeros” that have garnered intense public interest, including sites of trauma, civil disobedience, racial violence, environmental disaster, and contested history. Who owns these sites? What makes them so potent, even dreadful, that rectification become necessary? And why are some “fixable,” while others are so troubling or toxic that we need to obliterate them? Does large-scale tragedy justify the public’s claim to such sites in perpetuity (as with the former World Trade Center)?  We will explore how ground zeros are defined in spatial, material cultural and political terms; how they are managed, interpreted, and represented (especially visually); and what modes of remembrance, forgetting and resistance are possible at such troubling sites. Besides several famous cases (e.g. our best-known “Ground Zero,” the 9/11 site in lower Manhattan), we will explore many others, some in St. Louis, and several that have received less popular attention because their histories are “invisible” or have been suppressed. What do these sites tell us about American culture, and ourselves? 



The course fulfills the fieldwork requirement for AMCS majors, and will include exploration of nearby sites (fieldtrips!), as well as collaborative research. The course carries a $100 materials fee to cover the costs associated with this work.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK
MD

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L98-3501 section 01: Political Economy

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Valerio Dotti

Description

The course introduces students to the field of political economy. The approach is to apply the economic theory and concepts to political actors and behavior. Students are expected to learn: how economic and political forces may shape the incentives and constraint of political actors (e.g. voters and policy makers); the role of institutions in shaping both political behavior and policy outcomes. Prerequisite: Econ 1011.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 5:30-7:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

L11 3501

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L98-3507 section 01: Legal Conflict in Modern American Society

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Michael Cannon

Description

Thousands of lawsuits are filed daily in the state and federal courts of the United States. The disputes underlying those lawsuits are as messy and complex as the human, commercial, cultural and political dynamics that trigger them, and the legal processes for resolving those disputes are expensive, time-consuming and, for most citizens, seemingly impenetrable. At the same time law and legal conflict permeate public discourse in the United States to a degree that is unique in the world, even among the community of long-established democracies. The overarching objective of the course is to prepare our undergraduate students from any academic discipline (and with any post-graduate plans) to participate constructively in that discourse by providing them with a conceptual framework for understanding the conduct, mode of analysis and resolution of legal conflict by American legal institutions, and the evolution of - - and values underlying - - the substantive law American courts apply to those conflicts. This is, at core, a course in the kind of legal or litigation "literacy" that should be expected of the graduates of first-tier American universities. Some of the legal controversies that will be used to help develop that "literacy" include those surrounding the permissible use of lethal force in self-defense, the constitutionality of affirmative action in university admissions, contracts that are unconscionably one-sided, sexual harassment in the workplace, the extent of a landlord’s (or university’s) duty to prevent criminal assaults on its tenants (students), groundwater pollution alleged to cause pediatric cancers, the use and abuse of class action lawsuits, and warrantless searches of cellphone locator data by police. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher. It is most definitely not a prerequisite to be intending or even thinking about going to law school

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W-F-- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-3512 section 01: Model Minority: The Asian American Experience

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

LinLing Gao-Miles

Description

This course explores Asian American experience revolving around the concept of 'model minority.' It investigates the historical origins of 'model minority' and reconsiders this concept in socio-political discourses as well as in everyday Asian American experience. This course employs multidisciplinary inquiries to examine the complexity and heterogeneity among Asian Americans. Through a wide range of topics, such as identity, race, and (pan-)ethnicity, culture and religion, gender and sexuality, masculinity and femininity, and notions of invisibility and marginalization, this course situates Asian American experiences in the broader American (and at times transnational) ethno-racial and socio-political context.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L97 3512

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L98-3561 section 01: Law, Gender, and Justice

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Karen Tokarz

Description

This course (formerly called 'Women and the Law') explores how social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexuality have shaped traditional legal reasoning and American legal concepts, including women's legal rights. We will begin by placing our current legal framework, and its gender, race, sexuality, and other societal assumptions, in an historical and Constitutional context. We will then examine many of the questions raised by feminist theory, feminist jurisprudence, and other critical perspectives. For example, is the legal subject gendered male, and, if so, how can advocates (for women and men) use the law to gain greater equality? What paradoxes have emerged in areas such as employment discrimination, family law, or reproductive rights, as women and others have sought liberal equality? What is the equality/difference debate about and why is it important for feminists? How do intersectionality and various schools of feminist thought affect our concepts of discrimination, equality, and justice? The course is thematic, but we will spend time on key cases that have influenced law and policy, examining how they affect the everyday lives of women. Over the years, this course has attracted WGSS students and pre-law students. This course is taught by law students under the supervision of a member of the School of Law faculty. STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN L77 3561 WOMEN AND THE LAW CAN NOT TAKE THIS CLASS.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L77 3561

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L98-358 section 01: Law, Politics, and Society

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

James Gibson

Description

This course is an introduction to the functions of law and the legal system in American society. The course material will stress the realities of the operation of the legal system (in contrast to legal mythology), as well as the continuous interaction and feedback between the legal and political systems. There are four specific objectives to the course: (1) to introduce you to legal concepts and legal theories; (2) to analyze the operation of the appellate courts, with particular emphasis on the U.S. Supreme Court; (3) to analyze the operation of American trial courts, especially juries and the criminal courts; and (4) to examine the linkages between culture and law.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

L32 358

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L98-3651 section 01: Black Women Writers

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Rafia Zafar

Description

When someone says, black woman writer, you may well think of Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison. But not long ago, to be a black woman writer meant to be considered an aberration. When Thomas Jefferson wrote that Phillis Wheatley's poems were 'beneath the dignity of criticism,' he could hardly have imagined entire Modern Language Association sessions built around her verse, but such is now the case. In this class we will survey the range of Anglophone African American women authors. Writers likely to be covered include Phillis Wheatley, Harriet Wilson, Nella Larsen, Lorraine Hansberry, Octavia Butler, and Rita Dove, among others. Be prepared to read, explore, discuss, and debate the specific impact of race and gender on American literature.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L90 3651

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L98-367H section 01: Medicine, Healing and Experimentation in the Contours of Black History

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Sowande' Mustakeem

Description

Conversations regarding the history of medicine continue to undergo considerable transformation within academia and the general public. The infamous Tuskegee syphilis experiment serves as a marker in the historical consciousness regarding African Americans and the medical profession. This course taps into this particular evolution, prompting students to broaden their gaze to explore the often delicate relationship of people of African descent within the realm of medicine and healing. Tracing the social nature of these medical interactions from the period of enslavement through the 20th century, this course examines the changing patterns of disease and illness, social responses to physical and psychological ailments, and the experimental and exploitative use of black bodies in the field of medicine. As a history course, the focus will be extended towards the underpinnings of race and gender in the medical treatment allocated across time and space--the U.S., Caribbean, and Latin America--to give further insight into the roots of contemporary practice of medicine.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L22 3672

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L98-3680 section 01: The Cold War, 1945-1991

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Krister Knapp

Description

This course presents an assessment of the Cold War from the perspective of its major participants. Topics include: the origins of the Cold War in Europe and Asia; the Korean War; the Stalin regime; McCarthyism and the Red Scare; the nuclear arms race; the conflict over Berlin; Cold War film and literature; superpower rivalry in Guatemala, Cuba, Vietnam, Africa, and the Middle East; the rise and fall of detente; the Reagan years and the impact of Gorbechev; the East European Revolutions; and the end of the Cold War.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

War & Peace

Program Attributes

Same As

L22 3680

Register via WebStac

L98-3680 section 02: The Cold War, 1945-1991

Semester

FL2018

Section

02

Instructor

Krister Knapp

Description

This course presents an assessment of the Cold War from the perspective of its major participants. Topics include: the origins of the Cold War in Europe and Asia; the Korean War; the Stalin regime; McCarthyism and the Red Scare; the nuclear arms race; the conflict over Berlin; Cold War film and literature; superpower rivalry in Guatemala, Cuba, Vietnam, Africa, and the Middle East; the rise and fall of detente; the Reagan years and the impact of Gorbechev; the East European Revolutions; and the end of the Cold War.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

L22 3680

Register via WebStac

L98-371A section 01: Sociology of Immigration

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Ariela Schachter

Description

A review of theoretical and empirical research on how and why people migrate across international borders, and the consequences of international migration for immigrants and natives in the United States. While immigration is one of the most controversial issues in the contemporary United States, these contentious debates are not new. Americans once voiced the same concerns about the economic and social impact of Southern and Eastern European immigrants that today are aimed at immigrants from Latin America, Asia, Africa and the Caribbean. In this course we will compare historical (1880-1920) and contemporary (1965-present) waves of immigration to the United States. We will explore why and how people migrate, immigrant integration, the impact of immigration on native-born Americans, and how government policies-at the national, state, and local level-shape immigrant assimilation and what it means to be considered truly 'American,' in a social as well as a legal sense. Prerequisite: completion of an introductory sociology course or consent of the instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L40 3710

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L98-3742 section 01: Social Landscapes in Global View

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Michael Frachetti

Description

From the beginning of the human campaign, societies have socialized the spaces and places where they live. This socialization comes in many forms, including the generation of sacred natural places (e.g., Mt. Fuji) to the construction of planned urban settings where culture is writ large in overt and subtle contexts. Over the past two decades or so, anthropologists, archaeologists, and geographers have developed a wide body of research concerning these socially constructed and perceived settings -- commonly known as 'landscapes'. This course takes a tour through time and across the globe to trace the formation of diverse social landscapes, starting in prehistoric times and ending in modern times. We will cover various urban landscapes, rural landscapes, nomadic landscapes (and others) and the intersection of the natural environment, the built environments, and the symbolism that weaves them together. Chronologically, we will range from 3000 BCE to 2009 CE and we will cover all the continents. This course will also trace the intellectual history of the study of landscape as a social phenomenon, and will investigate the current methods used to recover and describe social landscapes around the world and through time. Join in situating your own social map alongside the most famous and the most obscure landscapes of the world and trace the global currents of your social landscape!

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L48 374

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L98-3755 section 01: Disability, Quality of Life & Community Responsibility

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Kathleen Kniepmann

Description

The increasing prevalence of disability presents major challenges for American society. Social participation can be a challenge for people with disabilities, while resources to address these needs tend to be limited. This course will begin by critically analyzing concepts of disability, Quality of Life, health and social participation. We will construct a framework for examining social participation and community resources across the lifespan. Public health, educational and environmental theories and methods will be applied to programs and services that aim to enhance quality of life with disabilities. We will analyze ecological approaches to enhancing social participation. Upon completion of this course, students will be equipped to analyze challenges and prioritize resources for individual and population health.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L43 375

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L98-375A section 01: American Culture: Methods & Visions: American Mixtape: Narrative, Memory, & Culture

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Noah Cohan

Description

What does it mean to "do" American Culture Studies? The course will trace the methods and visions of the interdiscipline through the metaphor of the mixtape, examining the ways in which American Studies scholars have remixed the narratives, memories, and cultures of the United States in pursuit of new knowledge. Like a mixtape, the course is curated, featuring several thematic "tracks" that pertain to race, gender, and sexuality, as well as power, politics, and entertainment. Within each track we will read texts that complement, riff on, or interrogate one another, including histories, literature, social science scholarship, and work on visual and material culture. For example, in a unit on "Race, Masculinity, and the 'Sweet Science'" students might read a history of Jack Johnson, an ethnography of a modern boxing gym, and a novel about Muhammad Ali.  

Students will write a series of short essays preparing for a final independent and multidisciplinary project. As a Writing Intensive course, AMCS 375A also serves as an occasion for students to think about matters of argument and presentation, and to develop ideas and models for future research. This course is intended for AMCS Juniors but all are welcome. Students will place themselves on the waitlist and then will be enrolled manually by the registrar, with priority given to AMCS majors and minors. This course fulfills the "multidisciplinary" (MD) requirement for Minors and fulfills the "Methods Seminar" requirements for Majors.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 10:00-11:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

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L98-3843 section 01: Filming the Black Freedom Struggle in St. Louis

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Denise Ward-Brown

Margaret Garb

Description

This inter-disciplinary course introduces students to the history of the Black freedom struggle in St. Louis and to the complex and multiple ways historic narratives are constructed. We will explore the political, economic and cultural history of St. Louisans who challenged racial segregation in housing and work, fought white mobs in city streets, and battled the destruction of Black communities by federal urban renewal and public housing policies. Students, working with a historian and a filmmaker, will research and make a documentary film on a piece of St. Louis' crucial contribution to the Black Freedom Struggle in America. We bring together documentary filmmaking and history research to draw attention to the multiple narratives (many long-neglected) of African American and urban history, and to the multiple approaches to presenting history.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

---T--- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
A Sense of Place
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

I50 3843

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L98-387A section 01: In Living Color: Performing the Black 90s

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Williams

Description

From Cross Colours overalls, to oversized sweatshirts, to boom boxes, the 1990s was loud, colorful, and in your face. But along with the fun of house parties and the growing prominence of hip-hop, black people in the U.S. also contended with heightened criminalization and poverty codified through the War on Drugs, welfare reform, police brutality, and divestment from public education. In the midst of insurgency, creativity, and the quiet that undergirded both, we will study the various cultural productions of black performers and consumers as they navigated the social and political landscapes of the 1990s. Focusing primarily on urban centers, we will study major works growing out of hip-hop, R&B, comedy, television shows, films, and popular literature that attends to the regional differences throughout the nation. In this course, we will use theories from performance and cultural studies to understand the specificities of blackness, gender, sexuality, religion, and geography in the 1990s.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
Popular Culture
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

Drama L98 387A

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L98-4001 section 01: Directed Study in American Culture Studies

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Heidi Kolk

Description

Directed study with an AMCS-affiliated faculty. All proposals for study must be submitted for review and approved by the AMCS advisor. See the AMCS website for the appropriate form. By permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-4002 section 01: Directed Study in Legal Culture

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Heidi Kolk

Description

Directed study with an AMCS-affiliated faculty. All proposals for study must be submitted for review and approved by the AMCS advisor. See the AMCS website for the appropriate form. By permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-4003 section 01: Advanced Research in American Culture Studies

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Heidi Kolk

Description

Directed study with an AMCS-affiliated faculty. All proposals for study must be submitted for review and approved by the AMCS advisor. See the AMCS website for the appropriate form. By permission of instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

TBA 12:00-12:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

FIELDWORK

Register via WebStac

L98-400A section 01: AMCS Capstone Workshop I

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Noah Cohan

Description

This workshop is required for AMCS majors completing an independent capstone project, whether by means of a 3-credit capstone project, a Latin Honors (6-credit) thesis, or a two-semester (6-credit) non-honors project. In all three cases, the capstone project is intended to serve as the culmination of the major--an opportunity to build on previous work and to engage with the broader field of American Culture Studies while developing a multidisciplinary framework suited to the goals of the project. The workshop is intended to fosters intellectual community and provide support during the research and writing process. Students share aspects of their work in large- and small-group settings\; discuss methods, models, and challenges of cultural studies; participate in several peer-review workshops; and develop insights and skills directly relevant to their capstone work. Barring circumstances which prevent it, the 3-credit capstone should be completed by the end of the fall semester. Students pursuing a 6-credit project (either a Latin Honors thesis or non-honors project) will continue their work into the following semester by enrolling in L98 4XX. Enrollment by permission of Program pending approval of project proposal, which will be submitted in the Spring of Junior Year. Students seeking to earn Latin Honors in AMCS must meet the University cumulative GPA minimum (3.65) and have permission of their thesis advisor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-4123 section 01: Arguemtnation Through Ethnography

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Rebecca Lester

Description

Ethnography is the traditional mainstay of anthropological academic writing. Through ethnography, anthropologists do more than simply describe a culture or a group of people; rather, they organize and present their field materials in particular ways in order to make intellectual, theoretical, and sometimes even political arguments. This seminar will explore the different ways anthropologists have used ethnography to make intellectual claims and frame theoretical or practical arguments. The aim of the course is to help students develop critical reading skills for engaging ethnographic materials as well as to explore the ways in which ethnography, when done well, can be a persuasive and engaging means of academic argumentation. This course is intended as a sequel to Anthro 472. Prerequisite: Anthro 472 or permission of instructor. NOTE: this course does not count for AMCS Concentration Areas but with approval of your advisor might count for the Disciplinary Foundations requirement. 

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 2:00-5:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

ANTHROPOLOGY L98 4123

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L98-4134 section 01: The AIDS Epidemic: Inequalities, Ethnography, and Ethics

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Shanti Parikh

Description

In the year 2000, HIV became the world's leading infectious cause of adult death, and in the next ten years, AIDS will kill more people than all wars of the twentieth century combined. As the global epidemic rages on, our greatest enemy in combating HIV/AIDS is not knowledge or resources, but global inequalities and the conceptual frameworks with which we understand health, human interaction, and sexuality. This course emphasizes the ethnographic approach for cultural analysis of responses to HIV/AIDS. Students will explore the relationship between local communities and wider historical and economic processes, and theoretical approaches to disease, the body, ethnicity/race, gender, sexuality, risk, addiction, power, and culture. Other topics covered include the cultural construction of AIDS and risk, government responses to HIV/AIDS, origin and transmission debates, ethics and responsibilities, drug testing and marketing, the making of the AIDS industry and 'risk' categories, prevention and education strategies, interaction between bio-medicine and alternative healing systems, and medical advances and hopes.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America

Program Attributes

Same As

L48 4134

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L98-4202 section 01: Civic Scholars Program Semester Three: Application and Integration of Civic Projects and Values

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Purvi Patel

Theresa Kouo

Description

This is the third semester course for students in the Civic Scholars Program of the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement. This one-credit seminar style course provides students with the opportunity to evaluate their civic projects and explore implications of their work. Through group discussions, readings, lectures, and guest speakers, students 1) connect their civic engagement project to local, national, and international contexts; 2) understand interdependence of social issues, public policy, and culture; and 3) explore sustainability and social change. The class meets weekly for one hour during the fall semester. Students are expected to take an active role in their learning through sharing their experiences, engaging with reading material, and participating in reflection exercises. Students are required to continue their coursework through the spring of their senior year, in the Civic Scholars Program, Semester Four: Civic Engagement across a Lifespan. Prerequisite: L98 3202 AND L98 3203

Credit Hours

1

Weekly Schedule

----F-- 9:00-10:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Register via WebStac

L98-4252 section 01: Seminar in Video Games: Video Games, Gender and Sexuality

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

TBA

Description

Attention to the prevalence of sexist and racist harassment in video game culture has intensified since the events of GamerGate in 2014 which targeted women in game design with violent threats, pushing many out of the industry. And yet, this aspect of video game culture can be traced back to the overwhelmingly male spaces of defense computing where they began and the video arcades in which they were popularized in the 1980s. In this course, we will interrogate this long history by analyzing video game texts and play cultures and their relationship to gender and sexuality. The course will begin with an introduction to key concepts in video game studies such as play, games, agency, simulation, and procedural rhetoric. We will then use these concepts to analyze the way that ideas about gender and sexuality are constructed and reinforced in games and how players interact with these systems. The focus throughout will be on understanding the contributions that feminist and queer theory offer for the study of video games. We will explore how textual representation, technological hardware, and codes and algorithms of gaming are all intertwined with questions of gender and sexuality. How do we think of representations of gender, sexuality, and race differently when they are executed on cybernetic platforms in which players interact with digital machines? How do textual representations of gender, race, and sexuality intersect with the cultures within the video game industry and with fan practices? Prior experience or skills with video games is not necessary and the class welcomes all levels of gamers and non-gamers as long as students are interested in engaging with games. [Prerequisite: Graduate status or completion of a 300 or above course in FMS or equivalent level course from another department relevant to the topic, plus permission of the instructor.] REQUIRED SCREENINGS: Tuesdays @ 7pm

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 4:00-5:30

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

Film and Media Studies L98

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L98-426A section 01: Performing the Political in American Dance

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Das

Description

This course is an exploration of the politics of performance and the performance of politics through the lens of American dance in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Through readings, screenings, and discussion, we will examine the ways in which American dance developed against and alongside political movements in the United States, particularly ones concerning nationalism, race, gender, and human rights. We will also investigate how the lens of dance and choreography offers an expansive means to conceptualize political questions of citizenship and social protest, broadening our understanding of embodied performance. Guided by several key philosophical texts, our class will focus on concepts necessary to examining the convergence of performance and politics (such as representation, ritual, spectacle, body, mimesis, propaganda, etc) while also paying special attention to the politics of funding and censorship that has governed the creation and presentation of dance in the United States. No dance experience is necessary.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W-- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

Same As

Dance L98 426A

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L98-429A section 01: Mass Culture & Modern Media Fantasylands: Cinema, Spectatorship, and the Spatial Imagination

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Diane Lewis

Description

Film 429 provides an introduction to cultural theories that are pertinent to the study of cinema, mass culture, and modernity. Rotating topics will highlight different aspects of cinema's relationship to popular culture, urbanism, modern technology, capitalism, and mass media. Students will encounter key theorists for understanding modern life and subjectivity, such as Marx, Freud, Foucault, Benjamin, and Raymond Williams. In addition, the course introduces core readings in the history and cultural theory of early cinema, which may include work by Miriam Hansen, Anne Friedberg, Tom Gunning, Charles Musser, Giuliana Bruno, Jacqueline Stewart, and others. Topics may include: cinema and modernity, cinema and mass culture, cinema and leisure, cinema and urbanism, and cinema and consumer culture.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

20th Century America
A Sense of Place
Popular Culture
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

L53 429

Register via WebStac

L98-436B section 01: Seminar in Black Social Sciences

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Garrett Duncan

Description

This seminar applies a deep reading to social science texts that examine the construction and experiences of black people in the United States from the point of view of black scholars. Readings include theoretical and empirical work. The seminar focuses on the influence of the disciplines of psychology, sociology, and anthropology on the policy and social practices that characterize dominant North American institutions. Advanced class level strongly advised.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 4:00-7:00

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L90 434B

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L98-4373 section 01: Immigration, Identity, and the Internet

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Sunita Parikh

Description

This class exmines a critical issue in contemporary societies: How do changes in technology affect the process of immigration and how immigrant identity is shaped?

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life
Visual, Material & Digital Cultures in the U.S.

Program Attributes

Same As

L32 4373

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L98-4400 section 01: Advanced Social and Political Philosophy

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Christopher Wellman

Description

A selective investigation of one or two advanced topics in the philosophical understanding of society, government, and culture. Readings may include both historical and contemporary materials. Possible topics include: liberalism, socialism, communitarianism, citizenship, nationalism, cosmopolitanism, social contract theory, anarchism, and the rights of cultural minorities. Prerequisites: one course in Philosophy at the 300-level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L30 4400

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L98-444 section 01: The American Family Drama

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Henry Schvey

Description

Rotating upper level seminar. Senior seminar normally offered each semester and meant to satisfy the 400-level requirement for the drama major.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

20th Century America

Program Attributes

Same As

L15 445

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L98-453 section 01: Sociology of Education

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

TBA

Description

This class will provide an overview of the sociology of education and human social development.  The readings and class assignments will support the examination of how social institutions and individuals' experiences within these institutions affect educational processes and social development.  The literature reviewed will span various levels of analysis, ranging from the individual to the structure of relations among social and educational institutions. In an increasingly complex society, important educational issues arise throughout the life cycle. This course will provide opportunities to examine all stages and all types of education at the individual, institutional, and organizational levels.   A reoccurring theme throughout the course will be a focus on education in metropolitan regions.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W-- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

Education L98 453

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L98-454 section 01: Environmental Policy

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Robert Pollak

Description

Course will examine the relationship between environmental economics and environmental policy. The course will focus on air pollution, water pollution, and hazardous wastes, with some attention given to biodiversity and global climate change. The course will examine critically two prescriptions that economics usually endorses: (1) 'balancing' of benefits against costs (e.g., benefit-cost analysis) and the use of risk analysis in evaluating policy alternatives; (2) use of market incentives (e.g., prices, taxes, or charges) or 'property rights' instead of traditional command-and-control regulations to implement environmental policy. Prerequisite: Econ 1011.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T--- 2:30-4:00

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Same As

L11 451

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A46-457B section 01: Segregation by Design: A Historical Analysis of the Impact of Planning and Policy in St. Louis

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Freixas

Description

This transdisciplinary seminar, bridging humanities and architecture, introduces students to research, theories, and debates currently being conducted on issues of segregation, urban policy and sustainability.  By placing these debates in a historical and local context students will discover how policy and decisions are entrenched with racial, cultural physical and socio-economic segregation, and create the spatial transformation of America's divided cities.  Students will learn to evaluate and analyze policy and planning through the framework of Triple Bottom Line Sustainability to understand the physical manifestation of segregation during growth and decline.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T-T- 1:00-2:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Policy-Making in American Society
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

MD

Same As

Architecture A46 457B

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L98-4604 section 01: Taboo: Contesting Race, Sexuality, and Violence in American Cinema

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

William Paul

Description

Pushing the envelope or going too far? What is the boundary between films that challenge us and films that offend us? This is a course about films that crossed that boundary, most often by presenting images of race, sexuality and violence, images that could attract audiences as much as they offended moral guardians and courted legal sanctions. Because they were denied the First Amendment protection of free speech by a 1915 Supreme Court decision, movies more than any prior art form were repeatedly subject to various attempts at regulating content by government at federal, state, and even municipal levels. Trying to stave off government control, Hollywood instituted forms of self-regulation, first in a rigid regime of censorship and subsequently in the Ratings system still in use. Because taboo content often means commercial success, Hollywood could nonetheless produce films that pushed the envelope and occasionally crossed over into more transgressive territory. While control of content is a top-down attempt to impose moral norms and standards of behavior on a diverse audience, it also reflects changing standards of acceptable public discourse. That topics once barred from dramatic representation by the Production Code - miscegenation, homosexuality and 'lower forms of sexuality,' abortion, drug addiction - could eventually find a place in American movies speaks to changes in the culture at large. In trying to understand these cultural changes, this course will explore films that challenged taboos, defied censorship, and caused outrage, ranging from films in the early 20th Century that brought on the first attempts to control film content through to films released under the Ratings system, which has exerted subtler forms of control. REQUIRED SCREENING:

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M-W---- 11:30-1:00

Concentration Areas

Popular Culture
The Construction of Race & Ethnicity in American Life

Program Attributes

Same As

L53 460

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L98-4621 section 01: The Political Economy of Urban Education

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Odis Johnson

Description

Defining a political economy of urban education involves the examination of power and wealth and the manner in which they operate in urban settings. It requires analysis of the larger urban social and economic context and consideration of historical forces that have brought the schools to their present state. In this course, we consider various political and economic factors that have influenced and shaped urban education in the United States, drawing upon the extant literature on urban education and related social science disciplines to characterize and discuss them. A particular focus of this course will be on the dynamic interrelationships among the political economy, urban education, and social stratification.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

--W---- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

L12 4621

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L98-481W section 01: History of Education in the United States

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Michelle Purdy

Description

Examines education within the context of American social and intellectual history. Using a broad conception of education in the United States and a variety of readings in American culture and social history, the course focuses on such themes as the variety of institutions involved with education, including family, church, community, work place, and cultural agency; the ways relationships among those institutions have changed over time; the means individuals have used to acquire an education; and the values, ideas, and practices that have shaped American educational policy in different periods of our history.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

-T----- 2:30-5:30

Concentration Areas

Policy-Making in American Society
Social Thought & Social Problems

Program Attributes

Same As

EDUCATION L98 481W

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L98-490A section 01: AMCS Senior Workshop: Academic Citizenship

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Maire Murphy

Description

How can I develop a stronger sense of academic identity and purpose? How can my research translate into opportunities beyond the classroom, from service to politics? In this workshop AMCS Majors explore these questions while receiving support at a crucial milestone, the Senior Capstone. Through reflection and writing students develop a stronger intellectual identity, and consider how their research prepares them to participate in conversations and activities that transcend scholarship. We think about this participation as a kind of "academic citizenship": students leveraging their learning to engage intellectual, social, and political life in and beyond campus. Students do this primarily through consideration of their capstone research, happening concurrently in the AMCS Capstone Workshop or in an approved seminar. While encouraging Majors to consider the intersection of their academic and personal goals, the workshop supports research (e.g., guest faculty discuss methodology), gives structure to activities already required for the Major (e.g., the capstone abstract), and builds community (e.g., peer-led discussions). The workshop also provides time and space for students to curate their AMCS portfolio. The Fall Workshop is part of a new one-credit workshop series designed to help AMCS Majors develop their portfolio and provide additional training and support at particular milestones in the major. The portfolio and accompanying workshops is a response to students' feedback. Graduating seniors tell us they would have liked more structured time to reflect on their work in the major; they would have liked to document their progress in the program more fully; and they wanted more opportunities to strengthen their class cohort. The Fall Workshop will provide all of those things, while centering students' attention on their growth as scholars and engaged citizens.
Attributes:A&S IQ: HUMEN: H

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M------ 4:00-5:00

Concentration Areas

Program Attributes

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A48-530 section 01: Special topics: Anti-Development: Vacancy, Wilderness and Ruin

Semester

FL2018

Section

01

Instructor

Michael Allen

Description

What if we let the city decline, change or go wild? Is land development truly "sustainable urbanism," or are depopulating cities like St. Louis and Detroit trying to speak another path to us? This seminar examines anti-growth urban land management and preservation practices - practices that embrace systems of emergent, wild and unexpected urbanism. With some readings as guide, students will explore topics of state landbanking and autonomous land trusts, managed depletion (including St. Louis' infamous "Team Four" memorandum), wilderness conservation and "greenway" creation, watershed reintroduction, agricultural land reclamation, experimental historic preservation projects that eschew restoration or even rehabilitation and even land taxation policies. The seminar will probe the question of what makes the city whole, with field outings in St. Louis and beyond. Work in the seminar will be based on site-specific interventions developed throughout the semester, proposing ways to undevelop sites and realize latent ecological vitalities.

Credit Hours

3

Weekly Schedule

M---- 8:30-11:30

Concentration Areas

A Sense of Place
Policy-Making in American Society

Program Attributes

Fieldwork with supplement

Same As

Landscape Architecture A48 530B

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